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Standard

Diagnostic and Prognostic Metrics for Engine Health Management Systems

2017-01-24
WIP
AIR7999
This SAE Aerospace Information Report (AIR) presents metrics for assessing the performance of diagnostic and prognostic algorithms applied to Engine Health Management (EHM) functions. This document consolidates and expands upon the metric information previously contained in AIR4985 and AIR5909. The emphasis is entirely on metrics and as such is intended to provide an extension and complement to such documents as ARP4176, which provides insight into how to create a cost benefit analysis to determine the justification for implementing an EHM system.
Standard

A Methodology for Quantifying the Performance of an Engine Monitoring System

2005-01-05
CURRENT
AIR4985
The purpose of this SAE Aerospace Information Report (AIR) is to present a quantitative approach for evaluating the performance and capabilities of an Engine Monitoring System (EMS). The value of such a methodology is in providing a systematic means to accomplish the following: 1 Determine the impact of an EMS on key engine supportability indices such as Fault Detection Rate, Fault Isolation Rate, Mean Time to Diagnose, In-flight Shutdowns (IFSD), Mission Aborts, and Unscheduled Engine Removals (UERs). 2 Facilitate trade studies during the design process in order to compare performance versus cost for various EMS design strategies, and 3 Define a “common language” for specifying EMS requirements and the design features of an EMS in order to reduce ambiguity and, therefore, enhance consistency between specification and implementation.
Standard

A Guide to Aircraft Power Train Monitoring

2002-03-06
HISTORICAL
AIR4174
The purpose of this SAE Aerospace Information Report (AIR) is to provide management, designers, and operators with information to assist them to decide what type of power train monitoring they desire. This document is to provide assistance in optimizing system complexity, performance and cost effectiveness. This document covers all power train elements from the point at which the gas generator energy is transferred to mechanical energy for propulsion purposes. The document covers engine power train components, their interfaces, transmissions, gearboxes, hanger bearings, shafting and associated rotating accessories, propellers and rotor systems as shown in Figure 1. This document addresses application for rotorcraft, turboprop, and propfan drive trains for both commercial and military aircraft.
Standard

A Guide to Aircraft Power Train Monitoring

2017-07-19
CURRENT
AIR4174A
The purpose of this SAE Aerospace Information Report (AIR) is to provide management, designers, and operators with information to assist them to decide what type of power train monitoring they desire. This document is to provide assistance in optimizing system complexity, performance and cost effectiveness. This document covers all power train elements from the point at which aircraft propulsion energy in a turbine or reciprocating engine is converted via a gear train to mechanical energy for propulsion purposes. The document covers aircraft engine driven transmission and gearbox components, their interfaces, drivetrain shafting, drive shaft hanger bearings, and associated rotating accessories, propellers, and rotor systems as shown in Figure 1. For guidance on monitoring additional engine components not addressed, herein (e.g., main shaft bearings and compressor/turbine rotors), refer to ARP1839.
Standard

Engine Monitoring System Reliability and Validity

2006-11-15
HISTORICAL
AIR5120
For Engine Monitoring Systems to meet their potential for improved safety and reduced operation and support costs, significant attention must be focused on their reliability and validity throughout the life cycle. This AIR will provide program managers, designers, developers and customers a concise reference of the activities, approaches and considerations for the development and verification of a highly reliable engine monitoring system. When applying the guidelines of this AIR it should be noted that engine monitoring systems physically or functionally integrated with the engine control system and/or performing functions that affect engine safety or are used to effect continued operation or return to service decisions shall be subject to the Type Investigation of the product in which they'll be incorporated and have to show compliance with the applicable airworthiness requirements as defined by the responsible Aviation Authority.
Standard

A GUIDE TO AIRCRAFT TURBINE ENGINE VIBRATION MONITORING SYSTEMS

1992-03-10
HISTORICAL
AIR1839A
This Aerospace Information Report (AIR) is a general overview of typical airborne vibration monitoring (AVM) systems with an emphasis on system hardware design considerations. It describes AVM systems currently in use. The purpose of this AIR is to provide information and guidance for the selection, installation, and use of AVM systems and their elements. This AIR is not intended as a legal document but only as a technical guide.
Standard

A Guide to Aircraft Turbine Engine Vibration Monitoring Systems

2001-07-01
HISTORICAL
AIR1839B
This SAE Aerospace Information Report (AIR) is a general overview of typical airborne engine vibration monitoring (EVM) systems with an emphasis on system design considerations. It describes EVM systems currently in use and future trends in EVM development.
Standard

A Guide to Aircraft Turbine Engine Vibration Monitoring Systems

2008-02-16
HISTORICAL
AIR1839C
This Aerospace Information Report (AIR) is a general overview of typical airborne engine vibration monitoring (EVM) systems applicable to fixed or rotary wing aircraft applications, with an emphasis on system design considerations. It describes EVM systems currently in use and future trends in EVM development. The broader scope of Health and Usage Monitoring Systems, (HUMS ) is covered in SAE documents AS5391, AS5392, AS5393, AS5394, AS5395, AIR4174.
Standard

Guide to Life Usage Monitoring and Parts Management for Aircraft Gas Turbine Engines

1998-05-01
HISTORICAL
AIR1872A
The effectiveness of Engine Life Usage Monitoring and Parts Management systems is largely determined by the aircraft-specific requirements. This document addresses the following areas: a Safety b Life-limiting criteria c Life usage algorithm development d Data acquisition and management e Parts life tracking f Design feedback g Cost effectiveness It primarily examines the requirements and techniques currently in use, and considers the potential impact of new technology to the following areas: a Parts classification and control requirements b Failure causes of life-limited parts c Engine life prediction and usage measurement techniques d Method validation e Parts life usage data management f Lessons learned g Life usage tracking benefits
Standard

GUIDE TO LIFE USAGE MONITORING AND PARTS MANAGEMENT FOR AIRCRAFT GAS TURBINE ENGINES

1988-02-29
HISTORICAL
AIR1872
The effectiveness of Engine Life Usage Monitoring and Parts Management systems is largely determined by the aircraft-specific requirements. This AIR addresses the following areas: a Safety. b Life-limiting criteria. c Life usage algorithm development. d Data acquisition and management. e Parts life tracking. f Design feedback. g Cost effectiveness. This AIR primarily examines the requirements and techniques currently in use, including: a Parts classification and control requirements. b Failure causes of life-limited parts. c Engine life prediction and usage measurement techniques. d Method validation. e Parts life usage data management. f Lessons learned. g Life usage tracking benefits.
Standard

A Guide to Aircraft Turbine Engine Vibration Monitoring Systems

2015-12-20
CURRENT
ARP1839
This Aerospace Recommended Practice (ARP) is a general overview of typical airborne engine vibration monitoring (EVM) systems applicable to fixed or rotary wing aircraft applications, with an emphasis on system design considerations. It describes EVM systems currently in use and future trends in EVM development. The broader scope of Health and Usage Monitoring Systems, (HUMS) is covered in SAE documents AS5391, AS5392, AS5393, AS5394, AS5395, AIR4174. This ARP also contains the essential elements of AS8054 which remain relevant and which have not been incorporated into Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEM) specifications.
Standard

A Process for Utilizing Aerospace Propulsion Health Management Systems for Maintenance Credit

2018-12-06
CURRENT
ARP5987
The process detailed within this document is generic and can be applied to commercial and military applications. It applies to the entire end-to-end health management system throughout its lifecycle, covering on-board and on-ground elements. The practical application of this standardized process is detailed in the form of a checklist. The on-board element described here are the source of the data acquisition used for off-board analysis. The on-board aspects relating to safety of flight, pilot notification, etc., are addressed by the other SAE Committees standards and documents. This document does not prescribe hardware or software assurance levels, nor does it answer the question “how much mitigation and evidence are enough”. The criticality level and mitigation method will be determined between the ‘Applicant’ and the regulator.
Standard

A Guide to APU Health Management

2018-04-09
CURRENT
AIR5317A
AIR5317 establishes the foundation for developing a successful APU health management capability for any commercial or military operator, flying fixed wing aircraft or rotorcraft. This AIR provides guidance for demonstrating business value through improved dispatch reliability, fewer service interruptions, and lower maintenance costs and for satisfying Extended Operations (ETOPS) availability and compliance requirements.
Standard

Prognostics for Aerospace Propulsion Systems

2018-09-11
WIP
AIR5871A
1.1 Purpose This document applies to prognostics of aerospace propulsion systems. Its purpose is to define the meaning of prognostics in this context, explain their potential and limitations, and to provide guidelines for potential approaches for use in existing condition monitoring environments. It also includes some examples. 1.2 Field of Application This document seeks to meet the increasing interest in prognostics for aerospace propulsion systems. Specifically, the document tries to provide a timely guideline for applying prognostic technologies to enhance the capability of current monitoring and diagnostic systems. Some examples are provided that are intended to illustrate different approaches and methodologies.
Standard

A Guide to APU Health Management

2006-03-24
HISTORICAL
AIR5317
The SAE Guide to APU health management establishes the foundation for developing a successful APU health management program at any aircraft or APU operator, such as an airline, an OEM, an equipment supplier, or a military transport unit. This guide identifies the best practices for using an APU health management program to improve dispatch reliability and to satisfy Extended Operations (ETOPS) availability requirements.
Standard

Prognostics for Gas Turbine Engines

2008-06-09
CURRENT
AIR5871
This document applies to prognostics of gas turbine engines and its related auxiliary and subsystems. Its purpose is to define the meaning of prognostics with regard to gas turbine engines and related subsystems, explain its potential and limitations, and to provide guidelines for potential approaches for use in existing condition monitoring environments. It also includes some examples.
Standard

AIRCRAFT GAS TURBINE ENGINE MONITORING SYSTEM GUIDE

1981-04-30
HISTORICAL
ARP1587
This ARP is a system guide for Engine Monitoring System (EMS) definition and implementation. This keystone document addresses EMS benefits, capabilities and requirements. It includes EMS in-flight and ground applications of people and equipment, and recommends EMS requirements that are a balance of selected benefits and available capabilities. This ARP purposely addresses a comprehensive EMS. The intent is to provide an extensive list of possible EMS design options. NOTE: - Section 3 describes an EMS. - Sections 4 and 5 outline benefits and capabilities that should be considered for study purposes to define EMS baselines for how much or how little engine monitoring might be required. - Section 6 provides implementation requirements that should be considered for an EMS after study baseline levels of EMS complexity are selected.
Standard

AIRCRAFT GAS TURBINE ENGINE MONITORING SYSTEM GUIDE

1993-04-01
HISTORICAL
ARP1587A
This SAE Aerospace Recommended Practice (ARP) is a system guide for Engine Monitoring System (EMS) definition and implementation. This keystone document addresses EMS benefits, capabilities, and requirements. It includes EMS in-flight and ground applications consisting of people, equipment, and software. It recommends EMS requirements that are a balance of selected benefits and available capabilities. This ARP purposely addresses a wide range of EMS architecture. The intent is to provide an extensive list of possible EMS design options. NOTE: a Section 3 describes an EMS. b Sections 4 and 5 outline benefits and capabilities that should be considered for study purposes to define EMS baselines for how much engine monitoring is required. c Section 6 provides implementation requirements that should be considered for an EMS after study baseline levels of EMS complexity are selected.
Standard

Aircraft Gas Turbine Engine Health Management System Guide

2007-05-21
CURRENT
ARP1587B
This SAE Aerospace Recommended Practice (ARP) examines the whole construct of an Engine Health Management (EHM) system. This keystone document gives a top-level view and addresses EHM description, benefits, and capabilities, and provides examples. This ARP purposely addresses a wide range of EHM architectures to demonstrate possible EHM design options. This ARP is not intended as a legal document and does not provide detailed implementation steps, but does address general implementation concerns and potential benefits. Other SAE documents (Aerospace Standards, Aerospace Recommended Practices, and Aerospace Information Reports) address specific component specifications, procedures and "lessons learned".
Standard

GUIDE TO OIL SYSTEM MONITORING IN AIRCRAFT GAS TURBINE ENGINES

1984-03-01
HISTORICAL
AIR1828
The purpose of this Aerospace Information Report (AIR) is to provide information and guidance for the selection and use of oil system monitoring devices and methods. This AIR is intended to be used as a technical guide. It is not intended to be used as a legal document or standard. The scope of this document is limited to those inspection and analysis methods and devices which can be considered appropriate for routine maintenance. In agreement with industry usage, wear particle size ranges are given in μm (1 μm = 10-3 millimeter = 10-6 meter). Other dimensions are given in millimeters, with inches in parenthesis.
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