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Standard

Gasoline, Alcohol, and Diesel Fuel Surrogates for Materials Testing

2000-01-10
CURRENT
J1681_200001
This SAE Recommended Practice presents recommendations for test fluids that can be used to simulate real world fuels. The use of standardized test fluids is required in order to limit the variability found in commercial fuels and fluids. Commercial fuels can vary substantially between manufacturers, batches, seasons, and geographic location. Further, standardized test fluids are universally available and will promote consistent test results for materials testing. Therefore, this document Explains commercial automotive fuel components Defines standardized components of materials test fluids Defines a nomenclature for test fluids Describes preparations for test fluids and Recommends fluids for testing fuel system materials The test fluid compositions specified in Section 7 of this document are recommended solely for evaluating materials.
Standard

Gasoline, Alcohol, and Diesel Fuel Surrogates for Materials Testing

2008-05-07
WIP
J1681
This SAE Recommended Practice presents recommendations for test fluids that can be used to simulate real world fuels. The use of standardized test fluids is required in order to limit the variability found in commercial fuels and fluids. Commercial fuels can vary substantially between manufacturers, batches, seasons, and geographic location. Further, standardized test fluids are universally available and will promote consistent test results for materials testing. Therefore, this document: a. Explains commercial automotive fuel components b. Defines standardized components of materials test fluids c. Defines a nomenclature for test fluids d. Describes preparations for test fluids and e. Recommends fluids for testing fuel system materials The test fluid compositions specified in Section 7 of this document are recommended solely for evaluating materials.
Standard

Passenger Car and Light Truck Fuel Containment

2002-03-26
CURRENT
J1664_200203
The scope of this SAE Information Report is the liquid fuel containment system for gasoline or flexible fuels (up to 85% methanol in gasoline), along with their associated vapors, as designed for use on passenger cars and light trucks. For purposes of this document, fuel containment addresses the fuel tank and components that are directly attached to the fuel tank. These components may include the filler neck, tank, fill vent tube, fuel cap, pump-sender, and rollover control valve closure seals, insofar as they act as closure or containment mechanisms. Emphasis will be on fuel containment and the required system closures. Furthermore, emphasis will be placed on design recommendations as they relate to performance. Mounting and shielding of the "system" components are only included to the extent they affect the containment aspects.
Standard

Filler Pipes and Openings of Motor Vehicle Fuel Tanks

1988-02-01
HISTORICAL
J1140_198802
The purpose of this recommended practice is to ensure compatibility between new vehicle designs and refueling vapor recovery nozzles by their dimensions and specifications. This recommended practice was developed primarily for gasoline-powered passenger car and truck applications but may be used in marine, industrial, and similar applications where refueling vapor recovery is required.
Standard

Filler Pipes and Openings of Motor Vehicle Fuel Tanks

2000-04-04
HISTORICAL
J1140_200004
This SAE Recommended Practice was developed primarily for gasoline-powered passenger car and truck applications but may be used in marine, industrial, and similar applications where refueling vapor recovery is required.
Standard

Filler Pipes and Openings of Motor Vehicle Fuel Tanks

2016-05-10
WIP
J1140
This SAE Recommended Practice was developed primarily for gasoline-powered passenger car and truck applications but may be used in marine, industrial, and similar applications where refueling vapor recovery is required.
Standard

Rated (Advertised) Fuel Capacity - Passenger Car, Multi-Purpose Passenger Vehicles, and Light Duty Trucks

2012-11-01
CURRENT
J398_201211
This recommended practice provides a method for establishing the rated or advertised fuel capacity for a vehicle utilizing liquid fuel at atmospheric pressure. It applies to passenger cars, multi-purpose passenger vehicles and light duty trucks (10 000 lb (4536 kg) maximum GVW), (Ref. SAE J1100). It also includes a standardized procedure for creating a full tank when another test requires that condition as a starting point. It is intended as a guide toward standard practice and is subject to change to keep pace with experience and technical advances.
Standard

Rated (Advertised) Fuel Capacity--Passenger Car, Multi-Purpose Passenger Vehicles, and Light Duty Trucks

2005-03-24
HISTORICAL
J398_200503
This SAE Recommended Practice defines conditions for evaluating the compatibility of vehicle fuel tanks and filler pipes with fuel dispensing facilities equipped with standard (non-vapor recovery) configuration as well as vapor recovery type nozzles. It applies to passenger cars, multipurpose passenger vehicles, and light-duty trucks 4536 kg (10,000 lb) maximum GVW. It includes a technique for filling a tank full that can be used to establish a reference condition for other tests which require starting with a full tank.
Standard

Rated (Advertised) Fuel Capacity-Passenger Car, Multi-Purpose Passenger Vehicles, and Light Duty Trucks

1995-07-01
HISTORICAL
J398_199507
This SAE Recommended Practice defines conditions for evaluating the compatibility of vehicle fuel tanks and filler pipes with fuel dispensing facilities equipped with standard (non-vapor recovery) configuration as well as vapor recovery type nozzles. It applies to passenger cars, multipurpose passenger vehicles, and light-duty trucks 4536 kg (10,000 lb) maximum GVW. It includes a technique for filling a tank full that can be used to establish a reference condition for other tests which require starting with a full tank.
Standard

Performance Requirements for Fuel System Tubing Assemblies

2017-12-01
WIP
J2045
This SAE Standard encompasses the recommended minimum requirements for non-metallic tubing and/or combinations of metallic tubing to non-metallic tubing assemblies manufactured as liquid- and/or vapor-carrying systems designed for use in gasoline, alcohol blends with gasoline, or diesel fuel systems. This SAE Standard is intended to cover tubing assemblies for any portion of a fuel system which operates above –40 °C (–40 °F) and below 115 °C (239 °F), and up to a maximum working gage pressure of 690 kPa (100 psig). The peak intermittent temperature is 115 °C (239 °F). For long-term continuous usage, the temperature shall not exceed 90 °C (194 °F). It should be noted that temperature extremes can affect assemblies in various manners and every effort must be made to determine the operating temperature to which a specific fuel line assembly will be exposed, and design accordingly.
Standard

Performance Requirements for Fuel System Tubing Assemblies

1992-10-01
HISTORICAL
J2045_199210
This SAE Standard encompasses the minimum functional requirements for fuel tubing and nonmetallic and nonrubber hose assemblies to be used in gasoline fuel injection systems. It utilizes information from the tubing standard SAE J2043, fittings and connectors SAE J2044, and protective covers SAE J2027. It is not intended to cover assemblies that operate below 30 °C (-22 °F) or above 115 °C (239 °F). In addition, this document is applicable for gasoline F.I. systems up to 5 bar (approximately 75 psig) operating pressure. It should be noted that temperatures can affect assemblies in various manners and every effort must be made to determine the operating temperature to which a specific assembly will be exposed, and design accordingly. This document does not make recommendations as to which assemblies are appropriate for different ranges of operating temperatures.
Standard

Performance Requirements for Fuel System Tubing Assemblies

2012-11-01
CURRENT
J2045_201211
This SAE Standard encompasses the recommended minimum requirements for non-metallic tubing and/or combinations of metallic tubing to non-metallic tubing assemblies manufactured as liquid- and/or vapor-carrying systems designed for use in gasoline, alcohol blends with gasoline, or diesel fuel systems. This SAE Standard is intended to cover tubing assemblies for any portion of a fuel system which operates above −40 °C (−40 °F) and below 115 °C (239 °F), and up to a maximum working gage pressure of 690 kPa (100 psig). The peak intermittent temperature is 115 °C (239 °F). For long-term continuous usage, the temperature shall not exceed 90 °C (194 °F). It should be noted that temperature extremes can affect assemblies in various manners and every effort must be made to determine the operating temperature to which a specific fuel line assembly will be exposed, and design accordingly.
Standard

Performance Requirements for Fuel System Tubing Assemblies

1998-02-01
HISTORICAL
J2045_199802
This SAE Standard encompasses the recommended minimum requirements for non-metallic tubing and/or combinations of metallic tubing to non-metallic tubing assemblies manufactured as a liquid- and/or vapor-carrying systems designed for use in gasoline, alcohol blends with gasoline, or diesel fuel systems. This SAE Standard is intended to cover tubing assemblies for any portion of a fuel system which operates above –40 °C (–40 °F) and below 115 °C (239 °F), and up to a maximum working gage pressure of 690 kPa (100 psi). The peak intermittent temperature is 115 °C (239 °F). For long-term continuous usage, the temperature shall not exceed 90 °C (194 °F). It should be noted that temperature extremes can affect assemblies in various manners and every effort must be made to determine the operating temperature to which a specific fuel line assembly will be exposed, and design accordingly.
Standard

Nonmetallic Fuel System Tubing

1996-11-01
CURRENT
J2043_199611
This SAE Standard covers the minimum requirements for nonmetallic tubing as manufactured for use in gasoline or diesel fuel systems. It is not intended to cover tubing for any portion of the system which operates below -40 degrees C, above 115 degrees C, or above a maximum working gage pressure of 690 kPa.
Standard

Nonmetallic Fuel System Tubing

1994-05-01
HISTORICAL
J2043_199405
This SAE Standard covers the minimum requirements for nonmetallic tubing as manufactured for use in gasoline or diesel fuel systems. It is not intended to cover tubing for any portion of the system which operates below -40 degrees C, above 115 degrees C, or above a maximum working gage pressure of 690 kPa.
Standard

Methods for Determining Physical Properties of Polymeric Materials Exposed to Hydrocarbon Fuels or Their Surrogates and Their Blends with Oxygenated Additives

2015-04-10
WIP
J1748
This SAE Recommended Practice applies to determining worst-case fuel, conditioning test specimens in worst-case fuel(s) prior to testing, individual tests for properties of polymers exposed to methanol-gasoline fuel mixtures. The determination of equilibrium, as well as typical calculations are also covered. Polymers are used in applications which require exposure to a variety of fluid environments. Tests to determine the effects of such exposure on material properties are well established. However, the determination of the effects on polymers exposed to fuels of variable alcohol and ether content poses new problems. This document seeks to address those concerns by detailing changes to standard tests that make them suitable for that purpose.
Standard

Methods for Determining Physical Properties of Polymeric Materials Exposed to Gasoline/Oxygenate Fuel Mixtures

1998-01-01
HISTORICAL
J1748_199801
This SAE Recommended Practice applies to determining worst-case fuel, conditioning test specimens in worst-case fuel(s) prior to testing, individual tests for properties of polymers exposed to methanol-gasoline fuel mixtures. The determination of equilibrium, as well as typical calculations are also covered. Polymers are used in applications which require exposure to a variety of fluid environments. Tests to determine the effects of such exposure on material properties are well established. However, the determination of the effects on polymers exposed to fuels of variable alcohol and ether content poses new problems. This document seeks to address those concerns by detailing changes to standard tests that make them suitable for that purpose.
Standard

Methods for Determining Physical Properties of Polymeric Materials Exposed to Hydrocarbon Fuels or Their Surrogates and Their Blends with Oxygenated Additives

2007-09-27
CURRENT
J1748_200709
This SAE Recommended Practice applies to determining worst-case fuel or test fluid surrogate, conditioning test specimens in worst-case fuel(s)/surrogate(s) prior to testing, individual tests for properties of polymeric materials exposed to oxygenate fuel/surrogate mixtures with additives. The determination of equilibrium, as well as typical calculations are also covered.
Standard

Recommended Methods for Conducting Corrosion Tests in Gasoline/Methanol Fuel Mixtures

1994-12-01
HISTORICAL
J1747_199412
This SAE Information Report is intended to convey the test methods developed for use in testing with methanol and gasoline blends. Corrosion testing of metals has a long and varied history. In spite of the problems inherent in extrapolating results of accelerated tests on standard specimens to actual field durability, engineers have been able, to a large extent, to rely on these results in making materials selection decisions. However, these tests have generally employed aqueous media and are not strictly applicable to the use of organic chemical media. With methanol-gasoline fuel blends and their high electrical conductivity relative to gasoline, the relevance of the historical database is lost. Therefore, to allow rapid build-up of a new database, several corrosion test procedures have been reviewed and amended where appropriate.
Standard

Recommended Methods for Conducting Corrosion Tests in Hydrocarbon Fuels or Their Surrogates and Their Mixtures with Oxygenated Additives

2007-07-20
HISTORICAL
J1747_200707
This SAE Information Report is intended to convey the test methods developed for use in testing with methanol and gasoline blends. Corrosion testing of metals has a long and varied history. In spite of the problems inherent in extrapolating results of accelerated tests on standard specimens to actual field durability, engineers have been able, to a large extent, to rely on these results in making materials selection decisions. However, these tests have generally employed aqueous media and are not strictly applicable to the use of organic chemical media. With methanol-gasoline fuel blends and their high electrical conductivity relative to gasoline, the relevance of the historical database is lost. Therefore, to allow rapid build-up of a new database, several corrosion test procedures have been reviewed and amended where appropriate.
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