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Standard

Education in Configuration and Data Management

2014-10-01
CURRENT
CMB6_10
Assist CM and engineering personnel in the implementation and coordination of CM unique procedures and disciplines of Configuration Identification, Change Control, Status Accounting and Audits.
Standard

Configuration Control

2014-10-01
CURRENT
CMB6_4
This Interface Control Plan establishes a program for interface control among the major segments/equipments of a DoD program. This could be an airborne weapon system, Medium Launch Vehicle System, Space Launch Complex System, etc. The program is based on formal agreements between participating organizations, and includes (1) documentation to establish, define and control interface requirements and to detail interface design definition between system segments, (2) interface management under the purview of the Interface Management Boards (IMB) and (3) interface control, through Interface Control Working Groups (ICWGs). The plan establishes the IMB and ICWG policy and procedures. Furthermore, it sets forth the Government Agencies Program Offices, associate contractors and participating Government Agency responsibilities in support of the Interface Control Program and the conduct of interface management/control through the IMBs, and ICWGs.
Standard

Automated Data Management Guideline

2014-10-01
CURRENT
DMG2
This document provides guidance in the developing, managing, controlling and transmitting of data in the current electronic environment.
Standard

Handbook: The Program Managers' Guide to the Integrated Baseline Review Process

2014-10-01
CURRENT
GEIAHB748_1
This guide clearly defines the purpose, goals, and objectives of an IBR. It also describes the attributes of an effective IBR and discusses a baseline review process that will lead to a better understanding of program risks. It provides a common definition and framework for the IBR Process. This process harmonizes, and to the extent possible, unifies the management objectives for all PMs. The IBR Process enables managers to effectively utilize the project Performance Measurement Baseline (PMB) to assess performance, and to better understand inherent risks. The IBR Process should continue throughout the life of a project.
Standard

Configuration Management Requirements for Subcontractors/Vendors

2014-10-01
CURRENT
CMB5A
The role of CM, within any one company's organization, on the development and production of a product has been established by internal company needs or imposed by customer dictum. (As used hereinafter, in order to reduce any confusion, computer programs, components, software, hardware, firmware, etc., are included in the designation "PRODUCT".) The primary focus of this Bulletin is directed toward the Buyer and Supplier personnel who will be managing hardware products in the production phase and software products in the full-scale development phase. The trend in DoD is toward expanded use of standardized components and subassemblies, using competitive reprocurement. The DoD needs to know the full span of CM requirements which should be included in the production contract and the management tasks that will have to be accomplished.
Standard

Configuration Management Requirements For Defense Contracts

2016-03-03
WIP
EIA649_1A
This document is used for placing Configuration Management Requirements on Defense Contracts after being tailored by the Acquirer. When effectively and consistently applied, Configuration Management (CM) provides a positive impact on product quality, cost, and schedule. The planning and execution of Configuration Management (CM) is an essential part of the product development and life cycle management process. It provides control of all configuration documentation, physical parts and software representing or comprising the product. Configuration Management's overarching goal is to establish and maintain consistency of a product's functional and physical attributes with its requirements, design and operational information throughout its life cycle. When effectively and consistently applied, Configuration Management (CM) provides a positive impact on product quality, cost, and schedule.
Standard

Configuration Management Requirements For Defense Contracts

2014-11-20
CURRENT
EIA649_1
This document applies to hardware and software and provides CM requirements to be placed on contracts after being tailored by the Acquirer. The requirements have been organized by the following five CM functions: a Configuration Planning and Management b Configuration Identification c Configuration Change Management d Configuration Status Accounting e Configuration Verification and Audit
Standard

Configuration Management Standard Implementation Guide

2016-03-01
CURRENT
GEIAHB649A
This handbook is intended to assist the user to understand the ANSI/EIA-649B standard principles and functions for Configuration Management (CM) and how to plan and implement effective CM. It provides CM implementation guidance for all users (CM professionals and practitioners within the commercial and industry communities, DoD, military service commands, and government activities (e.g., National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO)) with a variety of techniques and examples. Information about interfacing with other management systems and processes are included to ensure the principles and functions are applied in each phase of the life cycle for all product categories.
Standard

Configuration Management Standard

2019-02-07
CURRENT
EIA649C
This standard defines five CM functions and their underlying principles. The functions are detailed in Section 5. The principles, highlighted in text boxes, are designed to individually identify the essence of the related CM function and can be used to collectively create a checklist of “best practice” criteria to evaluate a CM program. The CM principles defined in this standard apply equally to internally focused enterprise information, processes, and supporting systems (i.e., Enterprise CM - policy driven, supporting the internal goals needed to achieve an efficient, effective and lean enterprise), as well as to the working relationships supported by the enterprise (i.e., Acquirer/Supplier CM - contracted relationship to support external trusted interaction with suppliers).
Standard

Implementation Guide for Configuration Management

2005-10-01
HISTORICAL
GEIAHB649
This handbook provides guidance about the use of CM and about CM's interface with other management systems and procedures. The paragraph numbers in this handbook map directly to the paragraph numbers in ANSI/EIA-649. It is applicable to the support of projects throughout all phases of a product's life cycle. Generic CM examples are included which may be tailored, taking into account the complexity and nature of the work and the product. It is applicable to the support of projects throughout all phases of a products life cycle. Generic CM examples are included and may be tailored to suit the complexity and nature of the work and the product. This handbook establishes a common framework for generic product life cycle CM. It addresses tailored implementation based on differences that may exist in organization policies and procedures, in the phase of the product life cycle, in the acquisition method, in the project size and complexity, and in the system requirements and development.
Standard

Configuration Management Standard

2011-04-01
HISTORICAL
EIA649B
This standard defines five CM functions and their underlying principles. The functions are detailed in Section 5. The principles, highlighted in text boxes, are designed to individually identify the essence of the related CM function, and can be used to collectively create a checklist of criteria to evaluate a CM program. In describing each CM function and its principles, this standard utilizes neutral Configuration Management terminology, while also providing equivalent terms, that have historically been used in various product environments (see Table 2). There is no intent to express preference for any particular set of terminology. Similarly, this standard uses a neutral set of names for the phases of a product’s life cycle, which are generic enough to be easily mapped to the myriad of different life cycle models in use. Table 1 illustrates some of the aliases for each phase name and identifies characteristics that apply in each one.
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