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Technical Paper

Experimental Assessment of Reynolds-Averaged Dissipation Modeling in Engine Flows

2007-09-16
2007-24-0046
The influence of the constant C3, which multiplies the mean flow divergence term in the model equation for the turbulent kinetic energy dissipation, is examined in a motored diesel engine for three different swirl ratios and three different spatial locations. Predicted temporal histories of turbulence energy and its dissipation are compared with experimentally-derived estimates. A “best-fit” value of C3 = 1.75, with an approximate uncertainty of ±0.3 is found to minimize the error between the model predictions and the experiments. Using this best-fit value, model length scale behavior corresponds well with that of measured velocity-correlation integral scales during compression. During expansion, the model scale grows too rapidly. Restriction of the model assessment to the expansion stroke suggests that C3 = 0.9 is more appropriate during this period.
Technical Paper

Late-Cycle Turbulence Generation in Swirl-Supported, Direct-Injection Diesel Engines

2002-03-04
2002-01-0891
Cycle-resolved analysis of velocity data obtained in the re-entrant bowl of a fired high-;speed, direct-injection diesel engine, demonstrates an unambiguous, approximately 100% increase in late-cycle turbulence levels over the levels measured during motored operation. Model predictions of the flow field, obtained employing RNG k-ε turbulence modeling in KIVA-3V, do not capture this increased turbulence. A combined experimental and computational approach is taken to identify the source of this turbulence. The results indicate that the dominant source of the increased turbulence is associated with the formation of an unstable distribution of mean angular momentum, characterized by a negative radial gradient. The importance of this source of flow turbulence has not previously been recognized for engine flows. The enhanced late-cycle turbulence is found to be very sensitive to the flow swirl level.
Technical Paper

The Evolution of Flow Structures and Turbulence in a Fired HSDI Diesel Engine

2001-09-24
2001-01-3501
In-cylinder fluid velocity is measured in an optically accessible, fired HSDI engine at idle. The velocity field is also calculated, including the full induction stroke, using multi-dimensional fluid dynamics and combustion simulation models. A detailed comparison between the measured and calculated velocities is performed to validate the computed results and to gain a physical understanding of the flow evolution. Motored measurements are also presented, to clarify the effects of the fuel injection process and combustion on the velocity field evolution. The calculated mean in-cylinder angular momentum (swirl ratio) and mean flow structures prior to injection agree well with the measurements. Modification of the mean flow by fuel injection and combustion is also well captured.
Technical Paper

Multidimensional Simulation of PCCI Combustion Using Gasoline and Dual-Fuel Direct Injection with Detailed Chemical Kinetics

2007-04-16
2007-01-0190
Homogeneous or partially premixed charge compression ignition combustion is considered to be an attractive alternative to traditional internal combustion engine operation because of its extremely low levels of pollutant emissions. However, since it is difficult to control the start of combustion timing, direct injection of fuel into the combustion chamber is often used for combustion phasing control, as well as charge preparation. In this paper, numerical simulations of compression ignition processes using gasoline fuel directly injected using a low pressure, hollow cone injector are presented. The multi-dimensional CFD code, KIVA3V, that incorporates various advanced sub-models and is coupled with CHEMKIN for modeling detailed chemistry, was used for the study. Simulation results of the spray behavior at various injection conditions were validated with available experimental data.
Technical Paper

Investigation of Mixing and Temperature Effects on HC/CO Emissions for Highly Dilute Low Temperature Combustion in a Light Duty Diesel Engine

2007-04-16
2007-01-0193
There is a significant global effort to study low temperature combustion (LTC) as a tool to achieve stringent emission standards with future light duty diesel engines. LTC utilizes high levels of dilution (i.e., EGR > 60% with <10%O2 in the intake charge) to reduce overall combustion temperatures and to lengthen ignition delay, This increased ignition delay provides time for fuel evaporation and reduces in-homogeneities in the reactant mixture, thus reducing NOx formation from local temperature spikes and soot formation from locally rich mixtures. However, as dilution is increased to the limits, HC and CO can significantly increase. Recent research suggests that CO emissions during LTC result from the incomplete combustion of under-mixed fuel and charge gas occurring after the premixed burn period [1, 2]1. The objective of the present work was to increase understanding of the HC/CO emission mechanisms in LTC at part-load.
Technical Paper

Development of a Hybrid, Auto-Ignition/Flame-Propagation Model and Validation Against Engine Experiments and Flame Liftoff

2007-04-16
2007-01-0171
In previous publications, Singh et al. [1, 2] have shown that direct integration of CFD with a detailed chemistry auto-ignition model (KIVA-CHEMKIN) performs reasonably well for predicting combustion, emissions, and flame structure for stratified diesel engine operation. In this publication, it is shown that the same model fails to predict combustion for partially premixed dual-fuel engines. In general, models that account for chemistry alone, greatly under-predict cylinder pressure. This is shown to be due to the inability of such models to simulate a propagating flame, which is the major source of heat release in partially premixed dual-fuel engines, under certain operating conditions. To extend the range of the existing model, a level-set-based, hybrid, auto-ignition/flame-propagation (KIVA-CHEMKIN-G) model is proposed, validated and applied for both stratified diesel engine and partially premixed dual-fuel engine operation.
Technical Paper

Development and Application of a Non-Gradient Step-Controlled Search Algorithm for Engine Combustion Optimization

2006-04-03
2006-01-0239
A new search technique, called Non-Gradient Step-Controlled algorithm (NGSC), is presented. The NGSC was applied independently from pre-selected starting points and as a supplement to a Genetic Algorithm (GA) to optimize a HSDI diesel engine using split injection strategies. It is shown that the NGSC handles well the challenges of a complex response surface and factor high-dimensionality, which demonstrates its capability as an efficient and accurate tool to seek “local” convergence on complex surfaces. By directly tracking the change of a merit function, the NGSC places no requirement on response surface continuity / differentiability, and hence is more robust than gradient-dependent search techniques. The directional search mechanism takes factor interactions into consideration, and search step size control is adopted to facilitate search efficiency.
Technical Paper

Modeling Diesel Engine NOx and Soot Reduction with Optimized Two-Stage Combustion

2006-04-03
2006-01-0027
A multi-dimensional Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) code with detailed chemistry, the KIVA-CHEMKIN-GA code, was employed in this study, where Genetic Algorithms (GA) were used to optimize heavy-duty diesel engine operating parameters. A two-stage combustion (TSC) concept was explored to optimize the combustion process at high speed (1737 rev/min) and medium load (57% load). Two combustion modes were combined in this concept. The first stage is ideally Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) combustion and the second stage is diffusion combustion under high temperature and low oxygen concentration conditions. This can be achieved for example by optimization of two-stage combustion using multiple injection or sprays from two different injectors.
Technical Paper

Multidimensional Modeling of Transient Gas Jet Injection Using Coarse Computational Grids

2005-04-11
2005-01-0208
In spite of the efficiency of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) as a design tool, numerical simulations of gaseous fuel injection have not been widely adopted because of the difficulty in modeling the complicated physical phenomena associated with high speed gas flows. In the present study, a new model for simulating transient direct injection of gaseous phase fuel, including hydrogen, into a combustion chamber using a practical computational grid was developed. The model was implemented into KIVA3V, a multi-dimensional CFD code. The new model employs several sub-models to describe the physical phenomena of high speed gas injection. The underexpanded jet issuing from the nozzle was modeled using the conditions at the Mach disk as inflow boundary conditions. The effect of turbulence is shown to lead to non-unique flow solutions.
Technical Paper

Numerical Predictions of Diesel Flame Lift-off Length and Soot Distributions under Low Temperature Combustion Conditions

2008-04-14
2008-01-1331
The lift-off length plays a significant role in spray combustion as it influences the air entrainment upstream of the lift-off location and hence the soot formation. Accurate prediction of lift-off length thus becomes a prerequisite for accurate soot prediction in lifted flames. In the present study, KIVA-3v coupled with CHEMKIN, as developed at the Engine Research Center (ERC), is used as the CFD model. Experimental data from the Sandia National Labs. is used for validating the model predictions of n-heptane lift-off lengths and soot formation details in a constant volume combustion chamber. It is seen that the model predictions, in terms of lift-off length and soot mass, agree well with the experimental results for low ambient density (14.8 kg/m3) cases with different EGR rates (21% O2 - 8% O2). However, for high density cases (30 kg/m3) with different EGR rates (15% O2 - 8% O2) disagreements were found.
Technical Paper

Study of Diesel Engine Size-Scaling Relationships Based on Turbulence and Chemistry Scales

2008-04-14
2008-01-0955
Engine design is a time consuming process in which many costly experimental tests are usually conducted. With increasing prediction ability of engine simulation tools, engine design aided by CFD software is being given more attention by both industry and academia. It is also of much interest to be able to use design information gained from an existing engine design of one size in the design of engines of other sizes to reduce design time and costs. Therefore it is important to study size-scaling relationships for engines over wide range of operating conditions. This paper presents CFD studies conducted for two production diesel engines - a light-duty GM-Fiat engine (0.5L displacement) and a heavy-duty Caterpillar engine (2.5L displacement). Previously developed scaling arguments, including an equal spray penetration scaling model and an extended, equal flame lift-off length scaling model were employed to explore the parametric scaling connections between the two engines.
Technical Paper

An Improved Spray Model for Reducing Numerical Parameter Dependencies in Diesel Engine CFD Simulations

2008-04-14
2008-01-0970
Lagrangian-Droplet and Eulerian-Fluid (LDEF) based spray models are widely used in engine and combustion system computations. Numerical grid and time-step-dependencies of Discrete Droplet Lagrangian spray models have been identified by previous researchers [1, 2]. The two main sources of grid-dependency are due to errors in predicting the droplet-gas relative velocity, and errors in describing droplet-droplet collision and coalescence processes. For reducing grid-dependency due to the relative velocity effects, results from gas jet theory are introduced along with a Lagrangian collision model [1, 3] and applied to model diesel sprays. The improved spray model is implemented in the engine simulation code KIVA-3V [4] and is tested under various conditions, including constant volume chambers and various engine geometries with vaporizing and combusting sprays with detailed chemistry.
Technical Paper

Adaptive Injection Strategies (AIS) for Ultra-Low Emissions Diesel Engines

2008-04-14
2008-01-0058
Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) combustion is being considered as a practical solution for diesel engines due to its high efficiency and low NOx and PM emissions. However, for diesel HCCI operation, there are still several problems that need to be solved. One is the spay-wall impingement issue associated with early injection, and a further problem is the extension of HCCI operation from low load to higher engine loads. In this study, a combination of Adaptive Injection Strategies (AIS) and a Two-Stage Combustion (TSC) strategy are proposed to solve the aforementioned problems. A multi-dimensional Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) code with detailed chemistry, the KIVA-CHEMKIN-GA code, was employed in this study, where Genetic Algorithms (GA) were used to optimize heavy-duty diesel engine operating parameters. The TSC concept was applied to optimize the combustion process at high speed (1737 rev/min) and medium load (57% load).
Technical Paper

A Numerical Investigation of Nozzle Geometry and Injection Condition Effects on Diesel Fuel Injector Flow Physics

2008-04-14
2008-01-0936
A three-dimensional homogeneous equilibrium model (HEM) has been developed and implemented into an engine computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code KIVA-3V. The model was applied to simulate cavitating flow within injector nozzle passages. The effects of nozzle passage geometry and injection conditions on the development of cavitation zones and the nozzle discharge coefficient were investigated. Specifically, the effects of nozzle length (L/D ratio), nozzle inlet radius (R/D ratio) and K or KS factor (nozzle passage convergence) were simulated, and the effects of injection and chamber pressures, and time-varying injection pressure were also investigated. These effects are well captured by the nozzle flow model, and the predicted trends are consistent with those from experimental observations and theoretical analyses.
Technical Paper

Modeling and Experiments of HCCI Engine Combustion Using Detailed Chemical Kinetics with Multidimensional CFD

2001-03-05
2001-01-1026
Detailed chemical kinetics was implemented in the KIVA-3V multidimensional CFD code to study the combustion process in Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) engines. The CHEMKIN code was implemented such that the chemistry and flow solutions were coupled. Detailed reaction mechanisms were used to simulate the fuel chemistry of ignition and combustion. Effects of turbulent mixing on the reaction rates were also considered. The model was validated using the experimental data from two modified heavy-duty diesel engines, including a Volvo engine and a Caterpillar engine operated at the HCCI mode. The results show that good levels of agreement were obtained using the present KIVA/CHEMKIN model for a wide range of engine conditions, including various fuels, injection systems, engine speeds, and EGR levels. Ignition timings were predicted well without the need to adjust any kinetic constants.
Technical Paper

Efficient Simulation of Diesel Engine Combustion Using Realistic Chemical Kinetics in CFD

2010-04-12
2010-01-0178
Detailed knowledge of hydrocarbon fuel combustion chemistry has grown tremendously in recent years. However, the gap between detailed chemistry and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) remains, because of the high cost of solving detailed chemistry in a large number of computational cells. This paper presents the results of applying a suite of techniques aimed at closing this gap. The techniques include use of a surrogate blend optimizer and a guided mechanism reduction methodology, as well as advanced methods for efficiently and accurately coupling the pre-reduced kinetic models with the multidimensional transport equations. The advanced methods include dynamic adaptive chemistry (DAC) and dynamic cell clustering (DCC) algorithms.
Technical Paper

The Impact of Engine Design Constraints on Diesel Combustion System Size Scaling

2010-04-12
2010-01-0180
A set of scaling laws were previously developed to guide the transfer of combustion system designs between diesel engines of different sizes [ 1 , 2 , 3 , 4 ]. The intent of these scaling laws was to maintain geometric similarity of key parameters influencing diesel combustion such as in-cylinder spray penetration and flame lift-off length. The current study explores the impact of design constraints or limitations on the application of the scaling laws and the effect this has on the ability to replicate combustion and emissions. Multi dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) calculations were used to evaluate the relative impact of engine design parameters on engine performance under full load operating conditions. The base engine was first scaled using the scaling laws. Design constraints were then applied to assess how such constraints deviate from the established scaling laws and how these alter the effectiveness of the scaling effort.
Technical Paper

Engine Development Using Multi-dimensional CFD and Computer Optimization

2010-04-12
2010-01-0360
The present work proposes a methodology for diesel engine development using multi-dimensional CFD and computer optimization. A multi-objective genetic algorithm coupled with the KIVA3V Release 2 code was used to optimize a high speed direct injection (HSDI) diesel engine for passenger car applications. The simulations were conducted using high-throughput computing with the CONDOR system. An automated grid generator was used for efficient mesh generation with 11 variable piston bowl geometry parameters. The first step in the procedure was to search for an optimal nozzle and piston bowl design. In this case, spray targeting, swirl ratio, and piston bowl shape were optimized separately for two full-load cases using simpler efficient combustion models (the characteristic time scale model and the shell ignition model). The optimal designs from the two optimizations were then validated using a combustion model with detailed chemistry (KIVA-CHEMKIN model and ERC n-heptane mechanism).
Technical Paper

Numerical Simulation of Diesel Sprays Using an Eulerian-Lagrangian Spray and Atomization (ELSA) Model Coupled with Nozzle Flow

2011-04-12
2011-01-0386
High-pressure diesel sprays were simulated with an Eulerian-Lagrangian Spray and Atomization (ELSA) model, based on a multidimensional engine computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code KIVA-3V. The atomization of the dense liquid core in the near-nozzle region was modeled with turbulent mixing of the diesel fuel with the ambient gas. Under the continuum assumption of a fuel-air mixture in this region, two transport equations were solved for the liquid mass fraction and liquid surface area density. At a certain downstream location where the spray became dilute, a switch from the Eulerian to the Lagrangian approach was made to benefit from the advantages of the conventional Lagrangian droplet models, such as droplet collision and turbulent dispersion modeling. The droplet size and velocity to be initialized at this switch were determined by the local CFD cell properties.
Technical Paper

Comparison of Diesel Combustion CFD Models and Evaluation of the Effects of Model Constants

2012-04-16
2012-01-0134
This paper describes numerical simulations that compare the performance of two combustion CFD models against experimental data, and evaluates the effects of combustion and spray model constants on the predicted combustion and emissions under various operating conditions. The combustion models include a Characteristic Time Combustion (CTC) model and CHEMKIN with reduced chemistry models integrated in the KIVA-3Vr2 CFD code. The diesel spray process was modeled using an updated version of the KH-RT spray model that features a gas jet submodel to help reduce numerical grid dependencies, and the effects of both the spray and combustion model constants on combustion and emissions were evaluated. In addition, the performance of two soot models was compared, namely a two-step soot model, and a more detailed model that considers soot formation from PAH precursors.
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