Refine Your Search

Search Results

Viewing 1 to 5 of 5
Journal Article

Development of an Advanced Torque Vectoring Control System for an Electric Vehicle with In-Wheel Motors using Soft Computing Techniques

2013-04-08
2013-01-0698
A two-passenger, all-wheel-drive urban electric vehicle (AUTO21EV) with four direct-drive in-wheel motors has been designed and developed at the University of Waterloo. A 14-degree-of-freedom model of this vehicle has been used to develop a genetic fuzzy yaw moment controller. The genetic fuzzy yaw moment controller determines the corrective yaw moment that is required to stabilize the vehicle, and applies a virtual yaw moment around the vertical axis of the vehicle. In this work, an advanced torque vectoring controller is developed, the objective of which is to generate the required corrective yaw moment through the torque intervention of the individual in-wheel motors, stabilizing the vehicle during both normal and emergency driving maneuvers. Novel algorithms are developed for the left-to-right torque vectoring control on each axle and for the front-to-rear torque vectoring distribution action.
Journal Article

Development of an Integrated Control Strategy Consisting of an Advanced Torque Vectoring Controller and a Genetic Fuzzy Active Steering Controller

2013-04-08
2013-01-0681
The optimum driving dynamics can be achieved only when the tire forces on all four wheels and in all three coordinate directions are monitored and controlled precisely. This advanced level of control is possible only when a vehicle is equipped with several active chassis control systems that are networked together in an integrated fashion. To investigate such capabilities, an electric vehicle model has been developed with four direct-drive in-wheel motors and an active steering system. Using this vehicle model, an advanced slip control system, an advanced torque vectoring controller, and a genetic fuzzy active steering controller have been developed previously. This paper investigates whether the integration of these stability control systems enhances the performance of the vehicle in terms of handling, stability, path-following, and longitudinal dynamics.
Journal Article

Development of a Fuzzy Slip Control System for Electric Vehicles with In-wheel Motors

2012-04-16
2012-01-0248
A two-passenger all-wheel drive urban electric vehicle (AUTO21EV) with four direct-drive in-wheel motors and an active steering system has been designed and developed at the University of Waterloo. A novel fuzzy slip control system is developed for this vehicle using the advantage of four in-wheel motors. A conventional slip control system uses the hydraulic brake system in order to control the tire slip ratio, which is the difference between the wheel center velocity and the velocity of the tire contact patch along the wheel plane, thereby influencing the longitudinal dynamics of a vehicle. The advantage of the proposed fuzzy slip controller is that it acts as an ABS system by preventing the tires from locking up when braking, as a TCS by preventing the tires from spinning out when accelerating.
Journal Article

Development of a Path-following and a Speed Control Driver Model for an Electric Vehicle

2012-04-16
2012-01-0250
A two-passenger all-wheel-drive urban electric vehicle (AUTO21EV) with four in-wheel motors and an active steering system has been designed and developed at the University of Waterloo. In order to evaluate the handling and performance of such a vehicle in the design stage and analyze the effectiveness of different chassis control systems before implementing them in the real vehicle, the simulation of a large number of different open-loop and closed-loop test maneuvers is necessary. Thus, in the simulation environment, not only is a mathematical vehicle model needed for every test maneuver, but a driver model must also be designed to simulate the closed-loop test maneuvers. The role of the driver model is to calculate the control inputs required to successfully follow a predefined path.
Journal Article

Integrated Stability Control System for Electric Vehicles with In-wheel Motors using Soft Computing Techniques

2009-04-20
2009-01-0435
An electric vehicle model has been developed with four direct-drive in-wheel motors. A high-level vehicle stability controller is proposed, which uses the principles of fuzzy logic to determine the corrective yaw moment required to minimize the vehicle sideslip and yaw rate errors. A genetic algorithm has been used to optimize the parameters of the fuzzy controller. The performance of the controller is evaluated as the vehicle is driven through a double-lane-change maneuver. Preliminary results indicate that the proposed control system has the ability to improve the performance of the vehicle considerably.
X