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Technical Paper

Reducing Exhaust HC Emission at SI Engine Using Continuous and Synchronized Secondary Air Injection

2000-06-12
2000-05-0296
The effect of secondary air injection (SAI) on exhaust hydrocarbon (HC) emission has been investigated in a spark-ignition (SI) single cylinder engine operating at steady-state cold condition. Both continuous SAI and synchronized SAI, which corresponds to intermittent secondary air injection to exhaust port, are tested. Oxidation characteristics of HC are monitored with a FID analyzer and exhaust gas temperatures with thermocouples. Effects of exhaust air-fuel ratio (A/F), location of SAI, and engine-A/F have been investigated. Results show that HC reduction rate increases as the location of SAI is closer to the exhaust valve for both synchronized and continuous SAIs. HC emission decreases with increasing exhaust-A/F when exhaust-A/F is rich, and is relatively insensitive when exhaust-A/F is lean. In synchronized SAI, SAI timing has significant effect on HC reduction and exhaust gas temperature. Optimum SAI timing observed is ATDC 100° and 230°.
Technical Paper

Modeling of Combustion Process of Multiple Injection in HSDI Diesel Engines using Modified Two-Dimensional Flamelet

2007-09-16
2007-24-0042
Ignition delay of the second injection of HSDI diesel engines is generally much shorter than that of the first injection because of the interaction between the radicals generated during the combustion process and the mixed gas of the second injection. Although previous Diesel combustion models could not explain this reaction, Hasse and Peters described the mass and heat transfer of the second injection and estimated the ignition delay of the second injection using two-dimensional flamelet equations. But a simulation of the two-dimensional flamelet equations requires enormous computational time. Thus, to analyze the combustion phenomena of the multiple injection mode in HSDI diesel engines effectively, the two-dimensional flamelet combustion model was modified in this study. To reduce the calculation time, two-dimensional flamelet equations were only applied near the stoichiometric region.
Technical Paper

Study on the Effects of the In-Cylinder EGR Stratification on NOx and Soot Emissions in Diesel Engines

2011-09-11
2011-24-0021
Much research has been devoted to reducing NOx and soot emissions simultaneously in diesel engines. The low temperature combustion (LTC) concept has the potential to reduce these emissions at the same time, but it has limitations to its commercialization. In-cylinder EGR stratification is another combustion concept meant to reduce both types of emissions simultaneously using non-uniform in-cylinder EGR gas distribution. The EGR stratification concept uses a locally high EGR region of the in-cylinder so that the emissions can be reduced without increasing the overall EGR rate. In this study, the EGR stratification concept was improved with a CFD-based analysis. First, a two-step piston was developed to maximize the stratified EGR effect. Then, the feasibility of combustion and emission control by stratified EGR was evaluated under cases of artificially distributed EGR stratification and conventional diesel engine conditions.
Technical Paper

Development of Engine Control Using the In-Cylinder Pressure Signal in a High Speed Direct Injection Diesel Engine

2011-04-12
2011-01-1418
Emissions regulations are becoming more severe, and they remain a principal issue for vehicle manufacturers. Many engine subsystems and control technologies have been introduced to meet the demands of these regulations. For diesel engines, combustion control is one of the most effective approaches to reducing not only engine exhaust emissions but also cylinder-by-cylinder variation. However, the high cost of the pressure sensor and the complex engine head design for the extra equipment are stressful for the manufacturers. In this paper, a cylinder-pressure-based engine control logic is introduced for a multi-cylinder high speed direct injection (HSDI) diesel engine. The time for 50% of the mass fraction to burn (MFB50) and the IMEP are valuable for identifying combustion status. These two in-cylinder quantities are measured and applied to the engine control logic.
Journal Article

Spray and Combustion Characteristics of Ethanol Blended Gasoline in a Spray Guided DISI Engine under Lean Stratified Operation

2010-10-25
2010-01-2152
An experimental study was performed to evaluate the effects of ethanol blending on to gasoline spray and combustion characteristics in a spray-guided direct-injection spark-ignition engine under lean stratified operation. The spray characteristics, including local homogeneity and phase distribution, were investigated by the planar laser-induced fluorescence and the planar Mie scattering method in a constant volume chamber. Therefore, the single cylinder engine was operated with pure gasoline, 85 %vol, 50 %vol and 25vol % ethanol blended with gasoline (E85, E50, E25) to investigate the combustion and exhaust emission characteristics. Ethanol was identified to have the potential of generating a more appropriate spray for internal combustion due to a higher vapor pressure at high temperature conditions. The planar laser-induced fluorescence image demonstrated that ethanol spray has a faster diffusion velocity and an enhanced local homogeneity.
Technical Paper

Study on the Effect of Injection Strategies on Particulate Emission Characteristics under Cold Start Using In-cylinder Visualization

2016-04-05
2016-01-0822
Due to the direct injection of fuel into a combustion chamber, particulate emission is a challenge in DISI engines. Specifically, a significant amount of particulate emission is produced under the cold start condition. In this research, the main interest was to investigate particulate emission characteristics under the catalyst heating condition because it is one of the significant particulate-emissionproducing stages under the cold start condition. A single-cylinder optically accessible engine was used to investigate the effect of injection strategies on particulate emission characteristics under the catalyst heating condition. The split injection strategy was applied during intake stroke with various injection pressures and injection timings. Using luminosity analysis of the soot radiation during combustion, the particulate formation characteristics of each injection strategy were studied. Moreover, the factors that affect PM formation were analyzed via fuel injection visualization.
Technical Paper

Virtual NOx sensor for Transient Operation in Light-Duty Diesel Engine

2016-04-05
2016-01-0561
Currently, diesel engine-out exhaust NOx emission level prediction is a major challenge for complying with the stricter emission legislation and for control purpose of the after-treatment system. Most of the NOx prediction research is based on the Zeldovich thermal mechanism, which is reasonable from the physical point of view and for its simplicity. Nevertheless, there are some predictable range limitations, such as low temperature with high EGR rate operating conditions or high temperature with low EGR rates. In the present paper, 3 additional considerations, pilot burned gas mixing before the main injection; major NO formation area; concentration correction, were applied to the previously developed real-time NO estimation model based on in-cylinder pressure and data available from ECU. The model improvement was verified on a 1.6 liter EURO5 diesel engine in both steady and transient operation.
Technical Paper

Prediction of In-Cylinder Pressure for Light-Duty Diesel Engines

2019-04-02
2019-01-0943
In recent years, emission regulations have been getting increasingly strict. In the development of engines that comply with these regulations, in-cylinder pressure plays a fundamental role, as it is necessary to analyze combustion characteristics and control combustion-related parameters. The analysis of in-cylinder pressure data enables the modelling of exhaust emissions in which characteristic temperature can be derived from the in-cylinder pressure, and the pressure can be used for other investigations, such as optimizing efficiency and emissions through controlling combustion. Therefore, a piezoelectric pressure sensor to measure in-cylinder pressure is an essential element in the engine research field. However, it is difficult to practice the installation of this pressure sensor on all engines and on-road vehicles owing to cost issues.
Technical Paper

New Index for Diagnosis of Abnormal Combustion Using a Crankshaft Position Sensor in a Diesel Engine

2019-04-02
2019-01-0720
Most research of internal combustion engine focuses on improving the fuel economy and reducing exhaust emissions to satisfy regulations and marketability. Engine combustion is a key factor in determining engine performance. Generally, engine operating parameters are optimized for the best performance and less exhaust emissions. However, abnormal combustion results in engine conditions that are far from an optimized operation. Abnormal combustion, including a misfire, can happen for a variety of reasons, such as superannuated vehicles, extreme changes in the driving environment, etc. Abnormal combustion causes serious deterioration of not only noise, vibration and harshness (NVH), but also the fuel economy and exhaust emission. NVH stands for unwanted noise, vibration and harshness from the vehicle. The misfiring especially deteriorates vehicle comfortability. Abnormal combustion at one cylinder breaks the exciting force balance between cylinders and causes unexpected vibration.
Technical Paper

Effects of Bore-to-Stroke Ratio on the Efficiency and Knock Characteristics in a Single-Cylinder GDI Engine

2019-04-02
2019-01-1138
As a result of stringent global regulations on fuel economy and CO2 emissions, the development of high-efficiency SI engines is more urgent now than ever before. Along with advanced techniques in friction reduction, many researchers endeavor to decrease the B/S (bore-to-stroke) ratio from 1.0 (square) to a certain value, which is expected to reduce the heat loss and enhance the burning rate of SI engines. In this study, the effects of B/S ratios were investigated in aspects of efficiency and knock characteristics using a single-cylinder LIVC (late intake valve closing) GDI (gasoline direct injection) engine. Three B/S ratios (0.68, 0.83 and 1.00) were tested under the same mechanical compression ratio of 12:1 and the same displacement volume of 0.5 L. The head tumble ratio was maintained at the same level to solely investigate the effects of geometrical changes caused by variations in the B/S ratio.
Technical Paper

Numerical Analysis on the Effect of Piston Bowl Geometry in Gasoline-Diesel Dual-Fuel Combustion

2019-04-02
2019-01-1164
As emissions regulations become stricter, a variety of advanced combustion concepts that can reduce emissions with a higher thermal efficiency have been suggested. Dual-fuel combustion is one of the alternatives that has both premixed and non-premixed combustion characteristics. Knowing the effects of the mixture formation in dual-fuel combustion is important because it determines the ignition location and the following combustion phase. Hence, a thorough investigation on the related factors, such as the engine hardware or fuel spray, is required. Meanwhile, Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) is a good technique to visualize the in-cylinder phenomena and enables quantitative investigations into the detailed combustion characteristics. In this paper, a 3-dimensional CFD simulation was used to investigate the effects of the mixture formation in dual-fuel combustion. The combustion model consists of two parts.
Technical Paper

Development of a Reduced Chemical Kinetic Mechanism and Ignition Delay Measurement in a Rapid Compression Machine for CAI Combustion

2007-04-16
2007-01-0218
A reduced chemical kinetic mechanism for a gasoline surrogate was developed and validated in this study for CAI (Controlled Auto Ignition) combustion. The gasoline surrogate was modeled as a blend of iso-octane, n-heptane, and toluene. This reduced mechanism consisted of 44 species and 59 reactions, including main reaction paths of iso-octane, n-heptane, and toluene. The ignition delay times calculated from this mechanism showed a good agreement with previous experimental data from shock tube measurement. A rapid compression machine (RCM) was developed and used to measure the ignition delay times of gasoline and surrogate fuels in the temperature range of 890K ∼ 1000K. The RCM experimental results were also compared with the RCM simulation using the reduced mechanism. It was found that the chemical reaction started before the end of the compression process in the RCM experiment. And the ignition delay time of the suggested gasoline surrogate was similar to that of gasoline.
Technical Paper

Modeling of Unburned Hydrocarbon Oxidation in Engine Conditions using Modified One-step Reaction Model

2007-08-05
2007-01-3536
Modeling of unburned hydrocarbon oxidation in an SI engine was performed in engine condition using modified one-step oxidation model. The new one-step equation was developed by modifying the Arrhenius reaction rate coefficients of the conventional one-step model. The modified model was well matched with the results of detailed chemical reaction mechanism in terms of 90 % oxidation time of the fuel. In this modification, the effect of pressure and intermediate species in the burnt gas on the oxidation rate investigated and included in developed one-step model. The effect of pressure was also investigated and included as an additional multiplying factor in the reaction equation. To simulate the oxidation process of piston crevice hydrocarbons, a computational mesh was constructed with fine mesh density at the piston crevice region and the number of cell layers in cylinder was controlled according to the motion of piston.
Technical Paper

Study of a Stratification Effect on Engine Performance in Gasoline HCCI Combustion by Using the Multi-zone Method and Reduced Kinetic Mechanism

2009-06-15
2009-01-1784
A gasoline homogeneous charged compression ignition (HCCI) called the controlled auto ignition (CAI) engine is an alternative to conventional gasoline engines with higher efficiency and lower emission levels. However, noise and vibration are currently major problems in the CAI engine. The problems result from fast burning speeds during combustion, because in the CAI engine combustion is controlled by auto-ignition rather than the flame. Thus, the ignition delay of the local mixture has to vary according to the location in the combustion chamber to avoid noise and vibration. For making different ignition delays, stratification of temperature or mixing ratio was tested in this study. In charge stratification, which determines the difference between the start of combustion among charges with different properties, two kinds of mixtures with different properties flow into two intake ports.
Technical Paper

Laminar Flame Speed Characteristics and Combustion Simulation of Synthetic Gas Fueled SI Engine

2008-04-14
2008-01-0965
As the real-time supplying of hydrogen-rich gas becomes possible by the advances in the on-board fuel reforming technologies, utilizations of synthetic gas in IC engines are actively studied. However, due to the lack of fundamental studies on the combustion characteristics of synthetic gas, there is no precedent for the simulation of combustion process in synthetic gas fueled SI engine. In this study, the laminar flame speeds of synthetic gas and its mixture with iso-octane were calculated under extensive initial conditions of 3,575 points derived by combinations of temperature, pressure, fraction of lower heating value of synthetic gas and air-excess ratio variations.
Technical Paper

An Overview of Hydrocarbon Emissions Mechanisms in Spark-Ignition Engines

1993-10-01
932708
This paper provides an overview of spark-ignition engine unburned hydrocarbon emissions mechanisms, and then uses this framework to relate measured engine-out hydrocarbon emission levels to the processes within the engine from which they result. Typically, spark-ignition engine-out HC levels are 1.5 to 2 percent of the gasoline fuel flow into the engine; about half this amount is unburned fuel and half is partially reacted fuel components. The different mechanisms by which hydrocarbons in the gasoline escape burning during the normal engine combustion process are described and approximately quantified. The in-cylinder oxidation of these HC during the expansion and exhaust processes, the fraction which exit the cylinder, and the fraction oxidized in the exhaust port and manifold are also estimated.
Technical Paper

The Effects of Spray Angle and Piston Bowl Shape on Diesel Engine Soot Emissions Using 3-D CFD Simulation

2005-05-11
2005-01-2117
In an HSDI Diesel engine, fuel can be injected to the combustion chamber earlier as a strategy to reduce NOx and soot emissions. However, in the case of early injection the in-cylinder pressure and temperature during injection are much lower than those of normal injection conditions. As a result, wall impingement can occur if the conventional spray angle and piston bowl shape are maintained. In this study, 3-D CFD simulation was used to modify the spray angle of the injector and the piston bowl shape so that wall impingement was minimized, and soot emissions were reduced. The wall impingement model was used to simulate the behavior of impinged droplets. In order to predict the performance and emissions of the engine, a flamelet combustion model with the kinetic chemical mechanism for NOx and soot was used. A reduction in soot emissions was achieved with the modification of the spray angle and piston bowl shape.
Technical Paper

Premixed Combustion Modeling in an SI Engine Considering the Burned Gas Composition

2005-05-11
2005-01-2108
Conventional combustion models are suitable for predicting flame propagation for a wrinkled flamelet configuration. But they cannot predict the burned gas composition. This causes the overestimation of burned gas temperature and pressure. A modified method of combustion simulation was established to calculate the chemical composition and to investigate their ultimate fate in the burned gas region. In this work, the secondary products of combustion process, like CO and H2, were considered as well as the primary products like CO2 and H2O. A 3-dimensional CFD program was used to simulate the turbulent combustion and a zero dimensional equilibrium code was used to predict the chemical composition of burned gas. With this simple connection, more reasonable temperature and pressure approaching the real phenomena were predicted without additional time costs.
Technical Paper

The Efficiency and Emission Characteristics of Dual Fuel Combustion Using Gasoline Direct Injection and Ethanol Port Injection in an SI Engine

2014-04-01
2014-01-1208
Ethanol, one of the most widely used biofuels, has the potential to increase the knock resistance of gasoline and decrease harmful emissions when blended with gasoline. However, due to the characteristics of ethanol, a trade-off relationship between knock tolerance and BSFC exists which is balanced by the blending ratio of gasoline and ethanol. Furthermore, in a spark-ignited engine, it is reported that the blending ratio that maximizes thermal efficiency varies based on the engine operating conditions. Therefore, an injection system that can deliver gasoline and ethanol separately is needed to fully exploit the benefit of ethanol. In this study, PFI injectors and a DI injector are used to deliver ethanol and gasoline, respectively. Using the dual fuel injection system, the compression ratio was increased from 9.5 to 13.3, and the knock mitigation characteristics at the full load condition were examined.
Technical Paper

Measurements and Modeling of Residual Gas Fraction in SI Engines

2001-05-07
2001-01-1910
The residual gas in SI engines is one of important factors on emission and performance such as combustion stability. With high residual gas fractions, flame speed and maximum combustion temperature are decreased and there are deeply related with combustion stability, especially at Idle and NOx emission at relatively high engine load. Therefore, there is a need to characterize the residual gas fraction as a function of the engine operating parameters. A model for predicting the residual gas fraction has been formulated in this paper. The model accounts for the contribution due to the back flow of exhaust gas to the cylinder during valve overlap and it includes in-cylinder pressure prediction model during valve overlap. The model is derived from the one dimension flow process during overlap period and a simple ideal cycle model.
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