Refine Your Search

Search Results

Viewing 1 to 4 of 4
Technical Paper

Fog Lamps: Frequency of Installation and Nature of Use

1997-02-24
970657
The goal of this study was to provide information about the frequency of installation and use of fog lamps. Two surveys were performed. In the first one, installation of fog lamps was estimated by a survey of parked vehicles in two iarge shopping centers. The second survey studied the usage of fog lamps during daytime and nighttime, under clear, rainy, or foggy conditions. In this survey, an observer in a moving vehicle noted the types of lamps that were energized on the fronts of oncoming vehicles, and whether fog lamps were installed at all. The main findings are: (1) The best estimate of the current frequency of installation of fog lamps in southeast Michigan is about 13%. (2) During daytime, the usage of fog lamps increased with deterioration in atmospheric conditions, with the usage reaching 50% of all installed fog lamps during moderate-to-heavy fog.
Technical Paper

Quantifying the Benefits of Variable Reflectance Rearview Mirrors

1994-03-01
940641
We collected photometric data, concerning the simultaneous levels of rearview mirror glare and luminance of the forward scene, in order to characterize the night driving environment for rearview mirrors. An instrumented vehicle was used to collect photometric data for each combination of three road types (urban, expressway, and rural) with two pavement conditions (dry and wet). We then used these data to quantify the benefits of variable-reflectance rearview mirrors relative to (1) fixed-reflectance mirrors, and (2) two-level prism mirrors. The performance of the various types of mirrors was quantified in terms of a figure of merit. The figure of merit is simply the percentage of the time that all of three mirror-performance measures are met: (1) discomfort glare, (2) forward visibility, and (3) rearward visibility.
Technical Paper

The Role of Binocular Information for Distance Perception in Rear-Vision Systems

2001-03-05
2001-01-0322
New developments in the use of two-dimensional displays to supplement driver vision have made it more important to understand the roles that various distance cues play in driver perception of distance in more conventional ways of viewing the road, including direct vision and viewing through rearview mirrors. The current study was designed to investigate the role of binocular distance cues for perception of distance in rearview mirrors. In a field experiment, we obtained data to estimate the importance of binocular cues for distance judgments under conditions representative of real-world traffic. The results indicate that, although binocular cues are potentially available to drivers, these cues probably play little or no role in distance judgments in rearview mirrors in normal driving situations.
Technical Paper

Benefits of Applying Adaptive Headlighting to the Current U.S. and European Low-Beam Patterns

2002-03-04
2002-01-0524
This analytical study examined the potential benefits of applying two embodiments of adaptive lighting to the U.S. and European low-beam patterns: curve lighting that involves shifting the beam horizontally into the curve, and motorway lighting that involves shifting the beam vertically upward. The curve lighting simulations paired 240-m radius left and right curves with a horizontal shift of 10°, and 80-m radius curves with a horizontal beam shift of 15°. The motorway lighting simulations involved upward aim shifts of 0.25° and 0.5°. For both curve and motorway lighting, changes in both seeing and glare illuminance were considered. Market-weighted model year 2000 U.S. and European beam patterns were used. We conclude that curve lighting, as simulated here, would substantially improve seeing performance on curves for both types of beams. On right curves (but not on left curves) there would be an increase in disability glare for oncoming traffic.
X