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Standard

Oil Systems for Helicopter Powerplants

1998-11-01
CURRENT
AIR4281
Turbine engines installed in helicopters require a highly sophisticated oil system to fulfill two tasks: a Cooling/oil supply b Lubrication While lubrication is an engine internal procedure, cooling and oil supply require more or less design activity on the aircraft side of the engine/airframe interface for proper engine function, depending on the engine type. The necessity for engine cooling and oil supply provisions on the airframe can lead to interface problems because the helicopter manufacturer can influence engine related functions due to the design of corresponding oil system components. This SAE Aerospace Information Report (AIR) deals with integration of engine oil systems with the airframe and gives information for both helicopter and engine manufacturers for a better understanding of interface requirements.
Standard

Helicopter Engine/Airframe Interface Document and Checklist

1997-06-01
CURRENT
ARP1507A
This SAE Aerospace Recommended Practice (ARP) provides a guide for the preparation of a Helicopter Engine/Airframe Interface Document and Checklist. This document and checklist is intended to provide complete relevant information on the characteristics, performance, and engine interfaces. Of most importance is the identification of the data and the location of data to assure that the engine manufacturer and the airframe manufacturer supply information that can be easily located by either manufacturer.
Standard

COOLING OF TURBINE ENGINES IN HELICOPTERS

1967-08-31
HISTORICAL
ARP996
A tested method of data presentation and use is described herein. The method shown is a useful guide, to be used with care and to be improved with use.
Standard

Performance of Low Pressure Ratio Ejectors for Engine Nacelle Cooling

1999-03-01
CURRENT
AIR1191A
A general method for the preliminary design of a single, straight-sided, low subsonic ejector is presented. The method is based on the information presented in References 1, 2, 3, and 4, and utilizes analytical and empirical data for the sizing of the ejector mixing duct diameter and flow length. The low subsonic restriction applies because compressibility effects were not included in the development of the basic design equations. The equations are restricted to applications where Mach numbers within the ejector primary or secondary flow paths are equal to or less than 0.3.
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