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Technical Paper

Engine Friction Model for Transient Operation of Turbocharged, Common Rail Diesel Engines

2007-04-16
2007-01-1460
The simulation of I.C. Engines operation, especially during transients, requires a fairly accurate estimation of the internal mechanical losses of the engine. The paper presents generic friction models for the main friction components of the engine (piston-ring-liner assembly, bearings and valve train), considering geometry of the engine parts and peculiarities of the corresponding lubrication processes. Separate models for the mechanical losses introduced by the injection system, oil and water pumps are also developed. All models are implemented as SIMULINK modules in a complex engine simulation code developed in SIMULINK and capable to simulate both steady state and transient operating conditions. Validation is achieved by comparison with measurements made on a four cylinder, common rail diesel engine, on a test bench capable to run controlled transients.
Technical Paper

Modeling and Measurement of Tribological Parameters between Piston Rings and Liner in Turbocharged Diesel Engine

2007-04-16
2007-01-1440
This paper presents tribological modeling, experimental work, and validation of tribology parameters of a single cylinder turbocharged diesel engine run at various loads, speeds, intake boost pressures, and cylinder liner temperatures. Analysis were made on piston rings and liner materials, rings mechanical and thermal loads, contact pressure between rings and liner, and lubricant conditions. The engine tribology parameters were measured, and used to validate the engine tribology models. These tribology parameters are: oil film thickness, coefficient of friction between rings and liner, friction force, friction power, friction torque, shear rate, shear stress and wear of the sliding surfaces. In order to measure the oil film thickness between rings and liner, a single cylinder AVL turbocharged diesel engine was instrumented to accept the difference in voltage drop method between rings, oil film, and liner.
Technical Paper

Thermal Barrier Coatings for High Output Turbocharged Diesel Engine

2007-04-16
2007-01-1442
Thermal barrier coatings (TBC) are perceived as enabling technology to increase low heat rejection (LHR) diesel engine performance and improve its longevity. The state of the art of thermal barrier coating is the plasma spray zirconia. In addition, other material systems have been investigated for the next generation of thermal barrier coatings. The purpose of this TBC program is to focus on developing binder systems with low thermal conductivity materials to improve the coating durability under high load and temperature cyclical conditions encountered in the real engine. Research and development (R&D) and analysis were conducted on aluminum alloy piston for high output turbocharged diesel engine coated with TBC.
Technical Paper

Lower Temperature Limits for Cold Starting of Diesel Engine with a Common Rail Fuel Injection System

2007-04-16
2007-01-0934
One of the most challenging problems in diesel engines is to reduce unburned HC emissions that appear as (white smoke) during cold starting. In this paper the research is carried out on a 4-cylinder diesel engine with a common rail fuel injection system, which is able to deliver multiple injections during cold start. The causes of combustion failure at lower temperature limits are investigated theoretically by considering the rate of heat release. The results of this clearly indicate that in addition to low cranking engine speed, heat transfer and blow-by losses at lower ambient temperatures, fuel injection events would contribute to the failure of combustion. Also, combustion failure takes place when the compression temperature is lower than some critical value. Based on these results, split-main injection strategy was applied during engine cold starting and validated by experiments in a cold room at lower ambient temperatures.
Technical Paper

Simulation-Based Cold-Start Control Strategy for a Diesel Engine with Common Rail Fuel System at Different Ambient Temperatures

2007-04-16
2007-01-0933
A new tool has been used to arrive at appropriate split injection strategy for reducing the cranking period during the cold start of a multi-cylinder engine at decreasing ambient temperatures. The concept behind this tool is that the combination of different injection parameters that produce the highest IMEP should be able to improve the cold startability of the diesel engine. In this work the following injection parameters were considered: 1) injection timing, 2) split injection fraction, 3) dwell time and 4) total fuel mass injected per cycle. A commercial engine cyclic simulation code has been modified for diesel engine cycle simulation at lower ambient temperatures. The code was used to develop IMEP control maps. The maps were used to identify the parameters that would give the best IMEP. The strategies that have been identified have been validated experimentally in a multi-cylinder diesel engine equipped with a common rail fuel injection system.
Technical Paper

Advanced Low Temperature Combustion (ALTC): Diesel Engine Performance, Fuel Economy and Emissions

2008-04-14
2008-01-0652
The objective of this work is to develop a strategy to reduce the penalties in the diesel engine performance, fuel economy and HC and CO emissions, associated with the operation in the low temperature combustion regime. Experiments were conducted on a research high speed, single cylinder, 4-valve, small-bore direct injection diesel engine equipped with a common rail injection system under simulated turbocharged conditions, at IMEP = 3 bar and engine speed = 1500 rpm. EGR rates were varied over a wide range to cover engine operation from the conventional to the LTC regime, up to the misfiring point. The injection pressure was varied from 600 bar to 1200 bar. Injection timing was adjusted to cover three different LPPCs (Location of the Peak rate of heat release due to the Premixed Combustion fraction) at 10.5° aTDC, 5 aTDC and 2 aTDC. The swirl ratio was varied from 1.44 to 7.12. Four steps are taken to move from LTC to ALTC.
Journal Article

Characteristics of Ion Current Signals in Compression Ignition and Spark Ignition Engines

2010-04-12
2010-01-0567
Ion current sensors have been considered for the feedback electronic control of gasoline and diesel engines and for onboard vehicles powered by both engines, while operating on their conventional cycles or on the HCCI mode. The characteristics of the ion current signal depend on the progression of the combustion process and the properties of the combustion products in each engine. There are large differences in the properties of the combustible mixture, ignition process and combustion in both engines, when they operate on their conventional cycles. In SI engines, the charge is homogeneous with an equivalence ratio close to unity, ignition is initiated by an electric spark and combustion is through a flame propagating from the spark plug into the rest of the charge.
Technical Paper

Adiabatic Turbocompound Engine Performance Prediction

1978-02-01
780068
The contemporary turbocharged aftercooled diesel engine is providing the world with one of the most efficient and dependable powerplants known to mankind. An adiabatic turbocompound diesel engine is analyzed in this paper to demonstrate that the contemporary diesel cycle without a cooling system could be the beginning of a new era in continued diesel engine efficiency, reliability and durability. The problems with the diesel cooling system encountered in service are presented. The consequence of an adiabatic turbocompound engine without any cooling system is treated for engine performance.
Technical Paper

TACOM/Cummins Adiabatic Engine Program

1983-02-01
830314
This paper discusses the goals, progress, and future plans of the TACOM/Cummins Adiabatic Engine Program. The Adiabatic Engine concept insulates the diesel combustion chamber with high temperature materials to allow hot operation near an adiabatic operation condition. Additional power and improved efficiency derived from this concept occur because thermal energy, normally lost to the cooling and exhaust systems, is converted to useful power through the use of turbomachinery and high-temperature materials. Engine testing has repeatedly demonstrated the Adiabatic Engine to be the most fuel efficient engine in the world with multi-cylinder engine performance levels of 0.285 LB/BHP-HR (48% thermal efficiency) at 450 HP representative. Installation of an early version of the Adiabatic Engine within a military 5 ton truck has been completed, with initial vehicle evaluation successfully accomplished.
Technical Paper

Ceramics in Heat Engines

1979-02-01
790645
Recent developments of high performance ceramics have given a new impetus for the advancement of heat engines. The thermal efficiencies of the Otto, Diesel, Brayton and the Stirling cycle can now be improved by higher operating temperatures, reduced heat loss, and exhaust energy recovery. Although physical and chemical properties of the high performance ceramics have been improved significantly, they still fall short of meeting the requirements necessary for application and commercialization of advanced heat engine concepts. Aside from the need for greater strength, the problems of consistency, quality, design, material inspection, insulative properties, oxidation and other important features must be solved before high performance ceramics can be considered a viable material for advanced heat engines. Several approaches in developing an adiabatic engine design in the laboratory are shown.
Technical Paper

High Temperature Engine Component Exploratory Design Development

1989-02-01
890296
Significant progress has been achieved in the development of advanced high-temperature, insulated, in-cylinder components for high-power-output miliraty diesel engines. Computer aided modeling and small-bore engine component testing have both been utilized extensively during the exploratory development process. Specific insulated optimal designs for the piston, cylinder headface, and cylinder liner have been identified. The designs all utilize thermal barrier coatings, titanium alloy, and interfacial air-gaps to provide thermal resistance. Finite element modeling including diesel cycle simulation has been utilized to screen and optimize material and design concepts relative to program objectives, while small-bore engine testing has been utilized to demonstrate component integrity. An improved slurry densified thermal barrier coating has been demonstrated by testing on a high temperature small-bore engine.
Technical Paper

“OPERAS” In Advanced Diesel Engines for Commercial and Military Applications

2006-04-03
2006-01-0927
Advanced diesel engines developed for the commercial market need to be adapted to the military requirements by OPERAS (Optimizing the injection pressure P, the Exhaust gas recirculation E, injection events Retard and/or Advance and the swirl ratio S). The different after treatment devices, already used or expected to be applied to diesel engines, require feed gases of appropriate properties for their efficient operation. To produce these gases some OPERAS are needed to control the diesel combustion process. Since military vehicles do not need the after treatment devices, the OPERAS of the commercial engines should be modified to meet the military requirements for high power density, better fuel economy, reduction of parasitic losses caused by the cooled EGR system, and reduction of invisible black and white smoke in the field.
Technical Paper

Advances in High Temperature Components for the Adiabatic Engine

1991-02-01
910457
An advanced low heat rejection engine concept has been selected based on a trade-off between thermal insulating performance and available technology. The engine concept heat rejection performance is limited by available ring-liner tribology and requires cylinder liner cooling to control the piston top ring reversal temperature. This engine concept is composed of a titanium piston, headface plate and cylinder liner insert with thermal barrier coatings. Monolithic zirconia valve seat inserts, and thermal barrier coated valves and intake-exhaust ports complete the insulation package. The tribological system is composed of chrome oxide coated cylinder, M2 steel top piston ring, M2 steel valve guides, and an advanced polyol ester class lubricant.
Technical Paper

Improvement of High-Temperature Diesel Engine Lubricants

1990-02-01
900687
Polyol ester-based diesel engine lubricants which achieve maximum theoretical high-temperature performance have been developed in our laboratories during the past three years. New lubricant basestocks and additives are currently being developed to perform under more severe thermal conditions, anticipated in low heat rejection diesel engines at the turn of the century. In this paper, the status of our current laboratory development and evaluation of new diesel engine lubricants, with high-temperature applicability beyond polyol esters, is summarized. Our final work in the polyol ester class of lubricants, through single-cylinder engine tests, is also presented.
Technical Paper

Effect of Load and Other Parameters on Instantaneous Friction Torque in Reciprocating Engines

1991-02-01
910752
The effect of many operating parameters on the instantaneous frictional (IFT) torque was determined experimentally in a single cylinder diesel engine. The method used was the (P - ω)method developed earlier at Wayne State University. The operating parameters were load, lubricating oil grade, oil, temperature and engine speed. Also IFT was determined under simulated motoring conditions, commonly used in engine friction measurements. The results showed that the motoring frictional torque does not represent that under firing conditions even under no load. The error reached 31.4% at full load. The integrated frictional torque over the whole cycle and the average frictional torque were determined. A comparison of the average frictional torque under load was compared with the average motoring torque.
Technical Paper

Diesel Engine Cold Starting: Combustion Instability

1992-02-01
920005
Combustion instability is investigated during the cold starting of a single cylinder, direct injection, 4-stroke-cycle, air-cooled diesel engine. The experiments covered fuels of different properties at different ambient air temperatures and injection timings. The analysis showed that the pattern of misfiring (skipping) is not random but repeatable. The engine may skip once (8-stroke-cycle operation) or twice (12-stroke-cycle operation) or more times. The engine may shift from one mode of operation to another and finally run steadily on the 4-stroke cycle. All the fuels tested produced this type of operation at different degrees. The reasons for the combustion instability were analyzed and found to be related to speed, residual gas temperature and composition, accumulated fuel and ambient air temperature.
Technical Paper

Thermomechanical Analysis of a Low Heat Rejection Cylinder Head

1992-02-01
920544
A large scale, high resolution, finite element methodology for analysis of generic thermomechanical behavior of complex, low heat rejection engine components has been developed. This paper describes this process and presents an example evaluation of a low heat rejection cylinder head. Because of symmetry considerations, a one cylinder section of the head was modeled. However, the geometric nature of this cylinder head section required very precise three-dimensional analysis techniques. The completed three-dimensional model contains 40,696 elements and 48,536 nodes. The results of this example model show high stresses at the valve bridge and injector bore. These stresses result from a constrained thermal expansion of the head, and are generally compressive and radial in nature. A comparison of three different material types indicated that two of the three exceeded, and one was below the elastic limit.
Technical Paper

Effect of Biodiesel (B-20) on Performance and Emissions in a Single Cylinder HSDI Diesel Engine

2008-04-14
2008-01-1401
The focus of this study is to determine the effect of using B-20 (a blend of 20% soybean methyl ester biodiesel and 80% ultra low sulfur diesel fuel) on the combustion process, performance and exhaust emissions in a High Speed Direct Injection (HSDI) diesel engine equipped with a common rail injection system. The engine was operated under simulated turbocharged conditions with 3-bar indicated mean effective pressure and 1500 rpm engine speed. The experiments covered a wide range of injection pressures and EGR rates. The rate of heat release trace has been analyzed in details to determine the effect of the properties of biodiesel on auto ignition and combustion processes and their impact on engine out emissions. The results and the conclusions are supported by a statistical analysis of data that provides a quantitative significance of the effects of the two fuels on engine out emissions.
Technical Paper

Experimental Investigation of Single and Two-Stage Ignition in a Diesel Engine

2008-04-14
2008-01-1071
This paper presents an experimental investigation conducted to determine the parameters that control the behavior of autoignition in a small-bore, single-cylinder, optically-accessible diesel engine. Depending on operating conditions, three types of autoignition are observed: a single ignition, a two-stage process where a low temperature heat release (LTHR) or cool flame precedes the main premixed combustion, and a two-stage process where the LTHR or cool flame is separated from the main heat release by an apparent negative temperature coefficient (NTC) region. Experiments were conducted using commercial grade low-sulfur diesel fuel with a common-rail injection system. An intensified CCD camera was used for ultraviolet imaging and spectroscopy of chemiluminescent autoignition reactions under various operating conditions including fuel injection pressures, engine temperatures and equivalence ratios.
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