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Journal Article

Enhanced Low-Order Model with Radiation for Total Temperature Probe Analysis and Design

2018-05-16
Abstract Analysis and design of total temperature probes for accurate measurements in hot, high-speed flows remains a topic of great interest in aerospace propulsion and a number of other engineering areas. One can apply detailed computational methods for simultaneous convection, conduction and radiation heat transfer, but such approaches are not suitable for rapid, routine analysis and design studies. For these studies, there is still a place for low-order approximate methods, and that is the subject of this paper. Here, an enhanced, low-order model is presented that includes conduction with variable thermal conductivity, convection with varying convection coefficient, varying diameter (and thus area) along the length of the sensor and radiation, all implemented in a convenient MATLAB code.
Journal Article

Investigations on Spark and Corona Ignition of Oxymethylene Ether-1 and Dimethyl Carbonate Blends with Gasoline by High-Speed Evaluation of OH* Chemiluminescence

2018-03-01
Abstract Bio-fuels of the 2nd generation constitute a key approach to tackle both Greenhouse Gas (GHG) and air quality challenges associated with combustion emissions of the transport sector. Since these fuels are obtained of residual materials of the agricultural industry, well-to-tank CO2 emissions can be significantly lowered by a closed-cycle of formation and absorption of CO2. Furthermore, studies of bio-fuels have shown reduced formation of particulate matter on account of the fuels’ high oxygen content therefore addressing air quality issues. However, due to the high oxygen content and other physical parameters these fuels are expected to exhibit different ignition behaviour. Moreover, the question is whether there is a positive superimposition of the fuels ignition behaviour with the benefits of an alternative ignition system, such as a corona ignition.
Journal Article

Soot Observations and Exhaust Soot Comparisons from Ethanol-Blended and Methanol-Blended Gasoline Combustion in a Direct-Injected Engine

2018-05-07
Abstract Particulate formation was studied under homogeneous-intent stoichiometric operating conditions when ethanol-blended (E10) or methanol-blended (M20) gasoline fuel was injected during intake stroke of a 4-stroke direct-injected engine. The engine was tested at wide open throttle under naturally aspirated conditions for a speed-load of 1500 rev/min and 9.8 bar indicated mean effective pressure. In-cylinder soot observations and exhaust soot measurements were completed for different fuel rail pressures, injection timings, coolant and piston temperatures of the optical engine. Fuel delivery settings were tested with both single and split injections during intake stroke. The target piston temperature of the optical engine was attained using pre-determined number of methane port fuel injection firing cycles. Overall, the in-cylinder soot observations correlated well with the engine-out soot measurements. A warmer cylinder head favored soot reduction for both fuels.
Journal Article

Corrosion Behavior of Automotive Materials with Biodiesel: A Different Approach

2018-05-07
Abstract The issue of material compatibility of biodiesel has been discussed by few researchers but the reported corrosion rates were alarmingly high. This study addresses the corrosion issue of biodiesel with automotive materials with a different but systematic approach following SAE J1747 standard. In earlier studies while conducting material compatibility studies with biodiesel, mention of any specific standard/s has not been generally observed. Earlier studies were conducted by storing the samples for a long time without any change of fuel. However in actual automotive application, change of fuel is always on a periodic basis due to consumption of fuel and the SAE standard recommends for the same. This difference has a significant effect on the material compatibility as this periodic change does not result in making the fuel particularly biodiesel more acidic which is otherwise when stored for a long time during the test period.
Journal Article

Compatibility Assessment of Fuel System Thermoplastics with Bio-Blendstock Fuel Candidates Using Hansen Solubility Analysis

2018-03-01
Abstract The compatibility of key fuel system infrastructure plastics with 39 bio-blendstock fuel candidates was examined using Hansen solubility analysis. Fuel types included multiple alcohols, esters, ethers, ketones, alkenes and one alkane. These compounds were evaluated as neat molecules and as blends with the gasoline surrogate, dodecane and a mix of dodecane and 10% ethanol (E10D). The plastics included polyphenylene sulfide (PPS), polyethylene terephthalate (PET), polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE), polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF), polyoxymethylene (POM), polybutylene terephthalate (PBT), polypropylene (PP), high density polyethylene (HDPE), along with several nylon grades. These materials have been rigorously studied with other fuel types, and their volume change results were found to correspond well with their predicted solubility levels.
Journal Article

The Impacts of Pd in BEA Zeolite on Decreasing Cold-Start NMOG Emission of an E85 Fuel Vehicle

2018-10-25
Abstract In the development of hydrocarbon (HC) traps for E85 fuel vehicle emission control, the addition of palladium (Pd) to BEA zeolite was studied for trapping and decreasing cold-start ethanol emissions. BEA zeolite after a laboratory aging at 750°C for 25 hours released nearly all of the trapped ethanol as unconverted ethanol at low temperature, and some ethene was released at a higher temperature by a dehydration reaction. The addition of Pd to BEA zeolite showed a decrease in the release of unconverted ethanol emissions even after the lab aging. The release of methane (CH4), acetaldehyde (CH3CHO), carbon monoxide (CO), and CO2 from Pd-BEA zeolite during desorption (temperature programmed desorption (TPD)) demonstrated that multiple ethanol reaction mechanisms were involved including dehydrogenation and decomposition reactions.
Journal Article

Limitations of Monoolein in Simulating Water-in-Fuel Characteristics of EN590 Diesel Containing Biodiesel in Water Separation Testing

2018-10-18
Abstract In modern diesel fuel a proportion of biodiesel is blended with petro-diesel to reduce environmental impacts. However, it can adversely affect the operation of nonwoven coalescing filter media when separating emulsified water from diesel fuel. This can be due to factors such as increasing water content in the fuel, a reduction in interfacial tension (IFT) between the water and diesel, the formation of more stable emulsions, and the generation of smaller water droplets. Standard water/diesel separation test methods such as SAE J1488 and ISO 16332 use monoolein, a universal surface-active agent, to simulate the effects of biodiesel on the fuel properties as part of water separation efficiency studies. However, the extent to which diesel/monoolein and diesel/biodiesel blends are comparable needs to be elucidated if the underlying mechanisms affecting coalescence of very small water droplets in diesel fuel with a low IFT are to be understood.
Journal Article

Improvement in DCT Shaft Lubrication through CFD Method

2018-10-25
Abstract Dual-clutch transmission (DCT) output shaft 1 (OS1) mount position is higher than the transmission lubricant level. Needle bearings and idler gears on OS1-insufficient lubrication issues and the transmission lubrication system were investigated. In the design model, the transmission housing lubrication channel and oil guide component design were studied. For numerical analysis, the STAR-CCM+ software was used to simulate transmission internal complex oil-gas multiphase transient flow morphology that monitored the four bore oil churning volumes of OS1. Finally, lubrication test results affirm simulation predictions that idler gears, needle bearings, and synchronizer rings on OS1 obtain sufficient lubrication provided that a reliable method to inspect lubrication design functions is available.
Journal Article

Determination of Influence of Parameters on Undercarriage Shock Absorber

2018-12-31
Abstract The simple oleo pneumatic (shock absorber) model was developed using the available computational fluid dynamics (CFD) program to understand how various parameters influence the performance of the undercarriage shock absorber. The study is divided into two parts: first part is focused on the influence of orifice geometry and the second part of the study is focused on the other parameters including chamber geometry. Both the studies are carried out using design of experiments (DOE) for the same output characteristics (response). In this study, the impacts on the flow behavior due to the orifice shapes are also studied. The results and the other outcomes are shown in the form of DOE parameters such as main effect plots and interaction plots.
Journal Article

Design of High-Lift Airfoil for Formula Student Race Car

2018-12-05
Abstract A two-dimensional model of three elements, high-lift airfoil, was designed at a Reynolds number of ?????? using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) to generate downforce with good lift-to-drag efficiency for a formula student open-wheel race car basing on the nominal track speeds. The numerical solver uses the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equation model coupled with the Langtry-Menter four-equation transition shear stress transport (SST) turbulence model. Such model adds two further equations to the ?? − ?? SST model resulting in an accurate prediction for the amount of flow separation due to adverse pressure gradient in low Reynolds number flow. The ?? − ?? SST model includes the transport effects into the eddy-viscosity formulation, whereas the two equations of transition momentum thickness Reynolds number and intermittency should further consider transition effects at low Reynolds number.
Journal Article

Assessing Road Load Coefficients of a Semi-Trailer Combination Using a Mechanical Simulation Software with Calibration Corrections

2019-01-07
Abstract The study of road loads on trucks plays a major role in assessing the effect of heavy-vehicle design on fuel conservation measures. Coastdown testing with full-scale vehicles in the field offers a good avenue to extract drag components, provided that random instrumentation faults and biased environmental conditions do not introduce errors into the results. However, full-scale coastdown testing is expensive, and environmental biases which are ever-present are difficult to control in the results reduction. Procedures introduced to overcome the shortcomings of full-scale field testing, such as wind tunnels and computational fluid dynamics (CFD), though very reliable, mainly focus on estimating the effects of aerodynamic drag forces to the neglect of other road loads which should be considered.
Journal Article

Computational-Based Aerodynamic Design for a Formula SAE Vehicle

2018-03-01
Abstract The computational analysis and design of an aerodynamics system for a Formula SAE vehicle is presented. The work utilizes a stochastic-approximation optimization (SAO) process coupled with a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) solver. The methodology is presented in a general manner, and is applicable to other complex parametrizable systems. A mix of discrete and continuous variables is established to define the airfoil profile, location, sizing and angle of all wing elements. Objectives are established to maximize downforce, minimize drag and maintain a target vehicle aerodynamic balance. A combination of successive 2D and 3D CFD evaluations have achieved vehicle aerodynamic performance targets at a minimal computational cost.
Journal Article

Comparison of Various Drag Reduction Devices and Their Aerodynamic Effects on the DrivAer Model

2018-07-05
Abstract In this study, two types of drag reduction devices (a horizontal plate, and a vertical plate) are used to weaken the downwash of the upper flow and c-pillar vortex of the DrivAer notchback model driving at high speed (140 km/h). By analyzing and comparing 15 cases in total, the aerodynamic drag reduction mechanism can be used in the development of vehicles. First, various CFD simulation conditions of a baseline model were compared to determine the analysis condition that efficiently calculates the correct aerodynamic drag. The vertical plate and horizontal plate applied in the path of the c-pillar vortex and downwash suppressed vortex development and induced rapid dissipation. As a result, the application of a 50-mm wedge-shaped vertical plate to the trunk weakened the vortex and reduced the drag by 3.3% by preventing the side flow from entering the trunk top.
Journal Article

Passive Flow Control on a Ground-Effect Diffuser Using an Inverted Wing

2018-08-13
Abstract In this experimental and computational study a novel application of aerodynamic principles in altering the pressure recovery behavior of an automotive-type ground-effect diffuser was investigated as a means of enhancing downforce. The proposed way of augmenting diffuser downforce production is to induce in its pressure recovery action a second pressure drop and an accompanying pressure rise region close to the diffuser exit. To investigate this concept with a diffuser-equipped bluff body, an inverted wing was situated within the diffuser flow channel, close to the diffuser exit. The wing’s suction surface acts as a passive flow control device by increasing streamwise flow velocity and reducing static pressure near the diffuser exit. Therefore, a second-stage pressure recovery develops along the diffuser’s overall pressure recovery curve as the flow travels from the diffuser’s low pressure, high velocity inlet to its high pressure, low velocity exit.
Journal Article

Steady Aeroelastic Response Prediction and Validation for Automobile Hoods

2018-07-10
Abstract The pursuit of improved fuel economy through weight reduction, reduced manufacturing costs, and improved crash safety can result in increased compliance in automobile structures. However, with compliance comes an increased susceptibility to aerodynamic and vibratory loads. The hood in particular withstands considerable aerodynamic force at highway speeds, creating the potential for significant aeroelastic response that may adversely impact customer satisfaction and perception of vehicle quality. This work seeks an improved understanding in computational and experimental study of fluid-structure interactions between automobile hoods and the surrounding internal and external flow. Computational analysis was carried out using coupled CFD-FEM solvers with detailed models of the automobile topology and structural components. The experimental work consisted of wind tunnel tests using a full-scale production vehicle.
Journal Article

Flow Analysis between Two Bluff Bodies in a Close Distance Platooning Configuration

2019-07-08
Abstract This article analyses the flow field between two 1/8-scale Generalized European Transport System (GETS) models which are placed in a two-vehicle platoon at close distances. Numerical simulations using the lattice Boltzmann method together with a wind tunnel experiment (open jet facility, OJF) were executed. Next, to balance measurements, coaxial volumetric velocimetry (CVV) measurements were performed to obtain information about the flow field. Three intervehicle distances, 0.10, 0.45 and 0.91 times the vehicle length, were tested for various platoon configurations where the vehicles in the platoon varied in terms of front-edge radius and the addition of tails. At the smallest intervehicle distance, the greatest reductions in drag were found for both the leading and trailing vehicles. The flow in the gap between the two vehicles follows an S-shaped path with small variations between the configurations.
Journal Article

Design and Experiment on Aircraft Electromechanical Actuator Fan at Different Altitudes and Rotational Speeds

2019-06-07
Abstract For electromechanical actuators (EMAs) and electronic devices cooling on aircraft, there is a need to study cooling fan performance at various altitudes from sea level to 12,000 m where the ambient pressure varies from 1 to 0.2 atm. As fan static pressure head is proportional to air density, the fan’s rotational speed has to be increased significantly to compensate for the low ambient pressure of 0.2 atm at the altitude of 12,000 m. To evaluate fan performance for EMA cooling, a high-rotational-speed, commercially available fan made by Ametek with a diameter of ~82 mm and ~3 m3/min zero-load open cooling flow rate when operating at 20,000 rpm was chosen as the baseline. According to fan scaling laws, this fan was expected to meet the cooling needs for an EMA when operating at 0.2 atm. Using a closed flow loop, the performance of the fan operating in the above ambient pressure range and at a rotational speed between 15,000 and 30,000 rpm was evaluated.
Journal Article

Systematic CFD Parameter Approach to Improve Torque Converter Simulation

2019-04-08
Abstract A systematic parametrization approach was employed to simulate a torque converter operating over a wide range of speed ratios. Results of the simulation yielded torque converter impeller and turbine torques prediction errors below 11% when compared to manufacturer data. Further improvements in the computational fluids dynamic (CFD) model reduced such errors down to 3% for the impeller and 6% for the turbine torque predictions. Convergence was reached well under 300 iterations for the most optimal variable setting, but each speed ratio was let to run for 300 iterations. Solution time for the 300 iterations was 40 minutes per speed ratio. The systematic parametrization provides a very competitive procedure for torque converter simulation with reduced computational error and fast solution time.
Journal Article

Investigation on Underhood Thermal Analysis of Truck Platooning

2018-03-22
Abstract This paper presents a combined aero-thermal computational fluid dynamic (CFD) evaluation of platooning medium duty commercial vehicles in two highway configurations. Thermal analysis comparison is made between an approach that includes vehicle drag reduction on engine heat rejection and one that does not by assuming a constant heat rejection based on open road conditions. The paper concludes that accounting for aerodynamic drag reduction on engine heat load provides a more real world evaluation than assuming a constant heat load based on open road conditions. A 3D CFD underhood thermal simulations are performed in two different vehicle platooning configurations; (i) single-lane and (ii) two-lane traffic conditions. The vehicle platooning consists of two identical vehicles, i.e. leading and trailing vehicle. In this work, heat exchangers are modeled by two different heat rejection rate models.
Journal Article

CFD Windshield Deicing Simulations for Commercial Vehicle Applications

2018-04-06
Abstract Windshield deicing performance is a key metric for HVAC system development and optimization within the sphere of commercial vehicle design. The primary physical parameters that drive this metric are pressure drops in the HVAC ducting, flow rate of the air through the system, and the transient vent temperature rise affected by engine coolant warm-up. However, many design engineers also have to take underhood and instrument panel (IP) space constraints into consideration while trying to optimize a new HVAC system design. This study leverages historical deicing simulation methodologies in conjunction with modern computational horsepower so as to optimize the HVAC ductwork in the studied commercial truck at the beginning of the design phase. By iterating on a design in the computational domain under steady-state and transient flow and thermal conditions, a robust HVAC system design can be created even prior to the prototyping stage of development.
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