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Journal Article

Soot Observations and Exhaust Soot Comparisons from Ethanol-Blended and Methanol-Blended Gasoline Combustion in a Direct-Injected Engine

2018-05-07
Abstract Particulate formation was studied under homogeneous-intent stoichiometric operating conditions when ethanol-blended (E10) or methanol-blended (M20) gasoline fuel was injected during intake stroke of a 4-stroke direct-injected engine. The engine was tested at wide open throttle under naturally aspirated conditions for a speed-load of 1500 rev/min and 9.8 bar indicated mean effective pressure. In-cylinder soot observations and exhaust soot measurements were completed for different fuel rail pressures, injection timings, coolant and piston temperatures of the optical engine. Fuel delivery settings were tested with both single and split injections during intake stroke. The target piston temperature of the optical engine was attained using pre-determined number of methane port fuel injection firing cycles. Overall, the in-cylinder soot observations correlated well with the engine-out soot measurements. A warmer cylinder head favored soot reduction for both fuels.
Journal Article

Effect of Spray-Exhaust Gas Interactions on Ammonia Generation in SCR Mixing Sections

2018-05-22
Abstract The selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of nitrogen oxides with ammonia is a promising solution to meet upcoming emission regulations for lean-burning combustion engines. Due to the toxicity of ammonia, exclusively SCR systems with precursor substances, e.g., a urea-water solution (UWS), are available or being developed. The determining factors for the efficiency of SCR systems are sufficient ammonia generation and homogenization upstream of the catalytic converter. In the first part, this study presents an experimental investigation of the occurring mechanisms during ammonia generation from UWS droplets; including the evaporation of water, the thermal decomposition of urea, and droplet-wall interactions. In the second part, the observed physical and chemical phenomena are mathematically described and constitute the basis for the development of a simulation model. For this purpose, experiments by means of TGA were conducted to thoroughly investigate the UWS decomposition.
Journal Article

Impact of Siloxanes in Biomethane on the Performance of a CNG Vehicle

2018-03-23
Abstract In this paper, the results of experiments to determine the effects of silicon-containing compounds in biogas on the performance of spark-ignited gas engines for use in CNG vehicles are presented. Initial research was performed on micro-CHP units, which have many features common with automotive engines, to identify engine components sensitive for silica deposition prior to investigating a practical CNG engine. The experiments on the micro-CHP units revealed that the catalyst was the most sensitive part for silica fouling, with strong impact on the reduction of NOx. With the insight gained from these experiments, an 9-week endurance test was performed on a light-duty CNG vehicle.
Journal Article

The Impacts of Pd in BEA Zeolite on Decreasing Cold-Start NMOG Emission of an E85 Fuel Vehicle

2018-10-25
Abstract In the development of hydrocarbon (HC) traps for E85 fuel vehicle emission control, the addition of palladium (Pd) to BEA zeolite was studied for trapping and decreasing cold-start ethanol emissions. BEA zeolite after a laboratory aging at 750°C for 25 hours released nearly all of the trapped ethanol as unconverted ethanol at low temperature, and some ethene was released at a higher temperature by a dehydration reaction. The addition of Pd to BEA zeolite showed a decrease in the release of unconverted ethanol emissions even after the lab aging. The release of methane (CH4), acetaldehyde (CH3CHO), carbon monoxide (CO), and CO2 from Pd-BEA zeolite during desorption (temperature programmed desorption (TPD)) demonstrated that multiple ethanol reaction mechanisms were involved including dehydrogenation and decomposition reactions.
Journal Article

Measurement and Analysis of the Operations of Drayage Trucks in the Houston Area in Terms of Activities and Exhaust Emissions

2018-05-22
Abstract The effects of exhaust emissions on public welfare have prompted the US Environmental Protection Agency to take various actions toward understanding, modeling, and reducing air pollution from vehicles. This study was performed to better understand exhaust emissions of heavy-duty diesel-powered tractor-trailer trucks that operate in drayage service, which involves the moving of shipping containers to or from port terminals. The study involved the use of portable emissions measurement systems (PEMS) to measure both gaseous and particulate matter (PM) mass emission rates and record various vehicle and engine parameters from the test trucks as they performed their normal drayage service. These measurements were supplemented with port terminal gate entry/exit logs for all drayage trucks entering the two Port of Houston Authority container terminals.
Journal Article

Aging Effects of Catalytic Converters in Diesel Exhaust Gas Systems and Their Influence on Real Driving NOx Emissions for Urban Buses

2018-06-18
Abstract The selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of nitrogen oxides seems to be the most promising technique to meet prospective emission regulations of diesel-driven commercial vehicles. In the case of developing cost-effective catalytic converters with comparably high activity, selectivity, and resistance against aging, ion-exchanged zeolites play a major role. This study presents, firstly, a brief literature review and subsequently a discussion of an extensive conversion analysis of exemplary Cu/ and Fe/zeolites, as well as a homogeneous admixture of both. The aging stages of SCR catalysts deserve particular attention in this study. In addition, the aging condition of the diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC) was analyzed, which influences the nitrogen dioxide (NO2) formation, because the NO2/nitrogen oxides (NOx) ratio upstream from the SCR converter could be identified as a key factor for low temperature NOx conversion.
Journal Article

Carbon Monoxide Density Pattern Mapping from Recreational Boat Testing

2018-10-04
Abstract Exposure to carbon monoxide (CO) gas can cause health risks for users of recreational boats and watercraft. Activities such as waterskiing, wakeboarding, tubing, and wakesurfing primarily utilize gasoline engine-driven vessels which produce CO as a combustion by-product. Recent watersports trends show an increase in popularity of activities which take place closer to the stern of the boat (such as wakesurfing) as compared to traditional waterskiing and wakeboarding. Advancements in gas emissions treatment in marine engine exhaust system designs have reduced risks for CO exposure in some boats. This article presents results from on-water testing of three recreational boats, reports average and maximum values of CO levels under various conditions, and exhibits mapping of the density of CO relative to the stern of the test vessels.
Journal Article

Analysis of Evaporative and Exhaust-Related On-Board Diagnostic (OBD) Readiness Monitors and DTCs Using I/M and Roadside Data

2018-03-01
Abstract Under contract to the EPA, Eastern Research Group analyzed light-duty vehicle OBD monitor readiness and diagnostic trouble codes (DTCs) using inspection and maintenance (I/M) data from four states. Results from roadside pullover emissions and OBD tests were also compared with same-vehicle I/M OBD results from one of the states. Analysis focused on the evaporative emissions control (evap) system, the catalytic converter (catalyst), the exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) system and the oxygen sensor and oxygen sensor heater (O2 system). Evap and catalyst monitors had similar overall readiness rates (90% to 95%), while the EGR and O2 systems had higher readiness rates (95% to 98%). Approximately 0.7% to 2.5% of inspection cycles with a “ready” evap monitor had at least one stored evap DTC, but DTC rates were under 1% for the catalyst and EGR systems, and under 1.1% for the O2 system, in the states with enforced OBD programs.
Journal Article

Analysis of Regulated Pollutant Emissions and Aftertreatment Efficiency in a GTDi Engine Using Different SOI Strategies

2018-06-25
Abstract In order to improve performance and minimize pollutant emissions in gasoline turbocharged direct-injection (GTDi) engines, different injection strategies and technologies are being investigated. The inclusion of exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) and the variation of the start of injection (SOI) are some of these strategies that can influence the air-to-fuel (AF) mixture formation and consequently in the combustion process and pollutant emissions. This paper presents a complete study of the engine performance, pollutant emissions and aftertreatment efficiency that produces the SOI variation with a fixed EGR rate in a 4-cylinder, turbocharged, gasoline direct-injection engine with 2.0 L displacement. The equipment used in this study are TSI-EEPS for particle measurement and HORIBA MEXA 1230-PM for soot measurement being HORIBA MEXA 7100-DEGR with a heated line selector the system employed for regulated gaseous emission measurement and aftertreatment evaluation.
Journal Article

Uncertainty in Gravimetric Analysis Required for LEV III Light-Duty Vehicle PM Emission Measurements

2018-06-20
Abstract With the reduction in PM emission standards for light duty vehicles to 3 mg/mi for current Federal and California standards and subsequently to 1 mg/mi in 2025 for California, the required PM measurements are approaching the detection limits of the gravimetric method. A “filter survey” was conducted with 11 laboratories, representing industry, agencies, research institutes, and academic institutions to analyze the accuracy of the current gravimetric filter measurement method under controlled conditions. The reference filter variability, measured within a given day over periods as short as an hour, ranged from 0.61 μg to 2 μg to 5.0 μg for the 5th, 50th, 95th percentiles (n > 40,000 weights, 317 reference objects), with a laboratory average of 2.5 μg.
Journal Article

In-Use Efficiency of Oxidation and Three-Way Catalysts Used in High-Horsepower Dual Fuel and Dedicated Natural Gas Engines

2018-07-01
Abstract Directional drilling rigs and hydraulic stimulation equipment typically use diesel fueled compression ignition (CI) engines. The majority of these engines are compliant with US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Tier 2 standards. To reduce fuel costs, industry is investing in dual fuel (DF) and dedicated natural gas (DNG) engines. DF engines use diesel oxidation catalysts (DOCs) to reduce CO and NMHC emissions. DNG engines may be either lean-burn or rich-burn and the latter uses three-way catalysts (TWC) to reduce CO, NMHC, and NOx emissions. This research presents in-use catalyst efficiency data collected pre- and post-catalyst for three DF engines and two DNG engines. One DF engine was converted earlier and did not include a DOC. Data were collected from six Tier 2 engines, two CI drilling engines converted to operate as DF, two CI hydraulic fracturing engines converted to operate as DF, and two SI DNG drilling engines.
Journal Article

CFD Modeling of Tailpipe NOx Sensor Accuracy

2018-08-08
Abstract In a modern diesel aftertreatment system, a sensor for nitrogen oxides (NOx) placed downstream of the selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalyst is necessary to determine if the tailpipe NOx concentration remains below the applicable On-board diagnostic (OBD) threshold. Typically the same NOx sensor also provides feedback to the dosing control module to adjust diesel exhaust fluid (DEF) dosing rate thereby controlling tailpipe NOx and ammonia emissions. However, feedback signal sent by the tailpipe NOx sensor may not always be accurate due to reasons including non-uniformity in NOx and ammonia distributions at SCR outlet. Flow based metrics from computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analyses, that are typically used to qualitatively assess NOx sensor accuracy in different designs are often inadequate. In this work, an improved CFD analysis procedure has been developed for assessing NOx sensor accuracy.
Journal Article

Active Control of Cylinder Charge Motion Using Vortex Generating Jets (VGJs) on Generic Intake Port Geometries

2018-08-08
Abstract Swirl is known to have impact on the combustion process and the engine emission performance. Generally the swirl flows are generated on engines by e.g. helical or tangential intake ports. However, such features of intake ports constrict the airflow, resulting in raising pumping losses and thus higher fuel consumption. This article introduces a further possibility to generate and regulate the swirl flow by injecting air directly into the intake ports using Vortex Generating Jets (VGJs). The effect of air injection was studied by means of experimental investigations regarding swirl generation and flow rate improvement. The optimization of VGJ diameters, positions as well as injection airflow rate was carried out with respect to energy efficiency of swirl generation.
Journal Article

Experimental Investigation of the Influence of Engine Operating Parameters on a Rankine Based Waste Heat Recovery System in a SI Engine

2018-04-18
Abstract One of the most promising techniques to reduce carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions of future combustion engines is the use of waste heat from exhaust gas with a Rankine cycle. The target of this study was to investigate the influence of engine operating parameters such as ignition timing, coolant temperature and injection parameters on the efficiency and performance of Rankine based waste heat recovery systems (WHR). This was done to gain basic knowledge about the influences of the engine operating parameters which helps to explain the system behavior under different operating conditions and second to identify the operating parameters with the highest overall system efficiency which can be used to highlight the impact of changes in engine application on the car. These first of a kind tests were performed on a state-of-the-art gasoline engine equipped with a prototype Rankine-system.
Journal Article

A Novel Approach towards Stable and Low Emission Stratified Lean Combustion Employing Two Solenoid Multi-Hole Direct Injectors

2018-04-18
Abstract Stratified lean combustion has proven to be a promising approach for further increasing the thermal efficiency of gasoline direct injection engines in low load conditions. In this work, a new injection strategy for stratified operation mode is introduced. A side and a central-mounted solenoid multi-hole injector are simultaneously operated in a single-cylinder engine. Thermodynamic investigations show that this concept leads to improved stability, faster combustion, reduced particle number emissions, and lower fuel consumption levels compared to using only one injector. Experiments at an optical engine and three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations explain the improvements by a more compact mixture and reduced piston wetting with two injectors. Finally, the application of external EGR in combination with the above concept allows NOx emissions to be effectively kept at a low level while maintaining a stable operation.
Journal Article

Comparative Analysis of Performance of Neural Estimators for Diagnostics in Engine Emission System

2018-06-14
Abstract This article describes the results of a comparative performance analysis on the use of neural estimators to accurately estimate the Differential Pressure (DP) signal from diesel engine systems equipped with a Diesel Particulate Filter (DPF) aftertreatment system. For most systems, there are known and modeled relationships between system inputs and outputs; however, in the case of nonlinear, time-varying systems a detailed modeling of the system might not be readily available. Therefore, Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs) have been used for developing critical relationship between system inputs (engine and aftertreatment parameters) and system output (DP signal). Both batch (offline) and online learning ANN estimators have been proposed. A control-oriented engine out DPF-DP model is desirable for on-board applications as a virtual DPF-DP sensor which could be used in parallel as an alternate analytical redundancy-based sensor.
Journal Article

Onboard Natural Gas Reforming for Heavy Duty Vehicles

2019-01-07
Abstract Powertrain simulations and catalyst studies showed the efficiency credits and feasibility of onboard reforming as a way to recover waste heat from heavy duty vehicles (HDVs) fueled by natural gas (NG). Onboard reforming involves 1) injecting NG into the exhaust gas recycle (EGR) loop of the HDV, 2) reforming NG on a catalyst in the EGR loop to hydrogen and carbon monoxide, and 3) combusting the reformed fuel in the engine. The reformed fuel has increased heating value (4-10% higher LHV) and flame speed over NG, allowing stable flames in spark ignition (SI) engines at EGR levels up to 25-30%. A sulfur-tolerant reforming catalyst was shown to reform a significant amount of NG (15-30% conversion) using amounts of precious metal near the current practice for HDV emissions control (10 g rhodium). Engine simulations showed that the high EGR levels enabled by onboard reforming are used most effectively to control engine load instead of waste-gating or throttling.
Journal Article

U.S. Light-Duty Vehicle Air Conditioning Fuel Use and Impact of Solar/Thermal Control Technologies

2018-12-11
Abstract To reduce fuel consumption and carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from mobile air conditioning (A/C) systems, “U.S. Light-Duty Vehicle Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Corporate Average Fuel Economy Standards” identified solar/thermal technologies such as solar control glazings, solar reflective paint, and active and passive cabin ventilation in an off-cycle credit menu. National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) researchers developed a sophisticated analysis process to calculate U.S. light-duty A/C fuel use that was used to assess the impact of these technologies, leveraging thermal and vehicle simulation analysis tools developed under previous U.S. Department of Energy projects. Representative U.S. light-duty driving behaviors and weighting factors including time-of-day of travel, trip duration, and time between trips were characterized and integrated into the analysis.
Journal Article

Numerical Investigation of the Characteristics of Spray/Wall Interaction with Hybrid Breakup Model by Considering Nozzle Exit Turbulence

2018-12-04
Abstract The spray/wall interaction plays a significant role on the mixture formation, combustion, and exhaust emissions. In the present study, the numerical code General Transport Equation Analysis (GTEA) is used to investigate the effect of fuel primary spray on the spray/wall interaction process. Taylor Analogy Breakup (TAB) model, Kelvin-Helmholtz-Rayleigh-Taylor (KH-RT) model, and Hybrid breakup (Hybrid) model are used to simulate the fuel spray process. By comparing the radius and height of the impinged spray, the performance of these breakup models is evaluated. Then, Bai and Gosman (BG) and Zhang and Jia (ZJ) spray/wall interaction models are implemented into GTEA code to describe the complicated spray/wall interaction process, and these interaction models are validated by the radius and height of the impinged spray and the size and velocity of the secondary droplets.
Journal Article

Finite Element Thermo-Structural Methodology for Investigating Diesel Engine Pistons with Thermal Barrier Coating

2018-12-14
Abstract Traditionally, in combustion engine applications, metallic materials have been widely employed due to their properties: castability and machinability with accurate dimensional tolerances, good mechanical strength even at high temperatures, wear resistance, and affordable price. However, the high thermal conductivity of metallic materials is responsible for consistent losses of thermal energy and has a strong influence on pollutant emission. A possible approach for reducing the thermal exchange requires the use of thermal barrier coating (TBC) made by materials with low thermal conductivity and good thermo-mechanical strength. In this work, the effects of a ceramic coating for thermal insulation of the piston crown of a car diesel engine are investigated through a numerical methodology based on finite element analysis. The study is developed by considering firstly a thermal analysis and then a thermo-structural analysis of the component.
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