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Journal Article

Extending the Magic Formula Tire Model for Large Inflation Pressure Changes by Using Measurement Data from a Corner Module Test Rig

2018-03-05
Abstract Since the tire inflation pressure has a significant influence on safety, comfort and environmental behavior of a vehicle, the choice of the optimal inflation pressure is always a conflict of aims. The development of a highly dynamic Tire Pressure Control System (TPCS) can reduce the conflict of minimal rolling resistance and maximal traction. To study the influence of the tire inflation pressure on longitudinal tire characteristics under laboratory conditions, an experimental sensitivity analysis is performed using a multivalent usable Corner Module Test Rig (CMTR) developed by the Automotive Engineering Group at Technische Universität Ilmenau. The test rig is designed to analyze suspension system and tire characteristics on a roller of the recently installed 4 chassis roller dynamometer. Camber angle, toe angle and wheel load can be adjusted continuously. In addition, it is possible to control the temperature of the test environment between −20 °C and +45 °C.
Journal Article

Experimental Investigation of the Near Wall Flow Downstream of a Passenger Car Wheel Arch

2018-03-01
Abstract The flow around and downstream of the front wheels of passenger cars is highly complex and characterized by flow structure interactions between the external flow, fluid exiting through the wheelhouse, flow from the engine bay and the underbody. In the present paper the near wall flow downstream of the front wheel house is analyzed, combining two traditional methods. A tuft visualization method is used to obtain the limiting streamline pattern and information about the near wall flow direction. Additionally, time resolved surface pressure measurements are used to study the pressure distribution and the standard deviation. The propagation of the occurring flow structures is investigated by cross correlations of the pressure signal and a spectral analysis provides the characteristic frequencies of the investigated flow.
Journal Article

Performance Margin for Geometric Road Design

2018-08-08
Abstract Although several methods exist for measuring the performance capability of a vehicle, many require detailed knowledge of the forces acting at each tire contact patch or do not account for both the vehicle dynamics and the road geometry. A simple vehicle model is proposed to estimate the upper limit of performance capability for a given operating condition (the Performance Envelope) based on the Effective Friction and the road geometry (slope and cross-slope). The Effective Friction accounts for both the vehicle dynamics and road surface properties and is estimated, through simulation or experimentation, using two standard vehicle dynamics tests: constant radius cornering and straight-line braking. The Performance Margin is defined as the additional performance capability available before the vehicle reaches the Performance Envelope, both represented in the intuitive units of gravity.
Journal Article

Computational-Based Aerodynamic Design for a Formula SAE Vehicle

2018-03-01
Abstract The computational analysis and design of an aerodynamics system for a Formula SAE vehicle is presented. The work utilizes a stochastic-approximation optimization (SAO) process coupled with a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) solver. The methodology is presented in a general manner, and is applicable to other complex parametrizable systems. A mix of discrete and continuous variables is established to define the airfoil profile, location, sizing and angle of all wing elements. Objectives are established to maximize downforce, minimize drag and maintain a target vehicle aerodynamic balance. A combination of successive 2D and 3D CFD evaluations have achieved vehicle aerodynamic performance targets at a minimal computational cost.
Journal Article

Passive Flow Control on a Ground-Effect Diffuser Using an Inverted Wing

2018-08-13
Abstract In this experimental and computational study a novel application of aerodynamic principles in altering the pressure recovery behavior of an automotive-type ground-effect diffuser was investigated as a means of enhancing downforce. The proposed way of augmenting diffuser downforce production is to induce in its pressure recovery action a second pressure drop and an accompanying pressure rise region close to the diffuser exit. To investigate this concept with a diffuser-equipped bluff body, an inverted wing was situated within the diffuser flow channel, close to the diffuser exit. The wing’s suction surface acts as a passive flow control device by increasing streamwise flow velocity and reducing static pressure near the diffuser exit. Therefore, a second-stage pressure recovery develops along the diffuser’s overall pressure recovery curve as the flow travels from the diffuser’s low pressure, high velocity inlet to its high pressure, low velocity exit.
Journal Article

Application of a New Method for Comparing the Overall Energy Consumption of Different Automotive Thermal Management Systems

2018-10-03
Abstract This article applies a new method for the evaluation and estimation of real-life energy consumption of two different thermal management systems based on driving behavior in the course of the day. Recent attempts to find energy-efficient thermal management systems for electric and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles have led to using secondary loop systems as an alternative approach for meeting dynamic heating and cooling demands and reducing refrigerant charge. However, the additional layer of thermal resistance, which influences the system’s transient behavior as well as passenger compartment comfort during cool-down or heat-up, makes it difficult to estimate the annual energy consumption. In this article, the overall energy consumption of a conventional and a secondary loop system is compared using a new method for describing actual customers’ driving behavior in the course of the day.
Journal Article

Comparison of Various Drag Reduction Devices and Their Aerodynamic Effects on the DrivAer Model

2018-07-05
Abstract In this study, two types of drag reduction devices (a horizontal plate, and a vertical plate) are used to weaken the downwash of the upper flow and c-pillar vortex of the DrivAer notchback model driving at high speed (140 km/h). By analyzing and comparing 15 cases in total, the aerodynamic drag reduction mechanism can be used in the development of vehicles. First, various CFD simulation conditions of a baseline model were compared to determine the analysis condition that efficiently calculates the correct aerodynamic drag. The vertical plate and horizontal plate applied in the path of the c-pillar vortex and downwash suppressed vortex development and induced rapid dissipation. As a result, the application of a 50-mm wedge-shaped vertical plate to the trunk weakened the vortex and reduced the drag by 3.3% by preventing the side flow from entering the trunk top.
Journal Article

Parametric Study of Asymmetric Side Tapering in Constant Cross Wind Conditions

2018-06-28
Abstract Sports Utility Vehicles (SUVs) often have blunt rear end geometries for design and practicality, which is not typically aerodynamic. Drag can be reduced with a number of passive and active methods, which are generally prioritised at zero yaw, which is not entirely representative of the “on road” environment. As such, to combine a visually square geometry (at rest) with optimal drag reductions at non-zero yaw, an adaptive system that applies vertical side edge tapers independently is tested statically. A parametric study has been undertaken in Loughborough University’s Large Wind Tunnel with the ¼ scale Windsor Model. The aerodynamic effect of implementing asymmetric side tapering has been assessed for a range of yaw angles (0°, ±2.5°, ±5° and ±10°) on the force and moment coefficients.
Journal Article

Vehicle Stability Control through Optimized Coordination of Active Rear Steering and Differential Driving/Braking

2018-07-05
Abstract In this article, a hierarchical coordinated control algorithm for integrating active rear steering and driving/braking force distribution (ARS+D/BFD) was presented. The upper-level control was synthesized to generate the required rear steering angle and external yaw moment by using a sliding-mode controller. In the lower-level controller, a control allocation algorithm considering driving/braking actuators and tire forces constraints was designed to assign the desired yaw moment to the four wheels. To this end, an optimization problem including several equality and inequality constraints were defined and solved analytically. Finally, computer simulation results suggest that the proposed hierarchical control scheme was able to help to achieve substantial enhancements in handling performance and stability.
Journal Article

Steady Aeroelastic Response Prediction and Validation for Automobile Hoods

2018-07-10
Abstract The pursuit of improved fuel economy through weight reduction, reduced manufacturing costs, and improved crash safety can result in increased compliance in automobile structures. However, with compliance comes an increased susceptibility to aerodynamic and vibratory loads. The hood in particular withstands considerable aerodynamic force at highway speeds, creating the potential for significant aeroelastic response that may adversely impact customer satisfaction and perception of vehicle quality. This work seeks an improved understanding in computational and experimental study of fluid-structure interactions between automobile hoods and the surrounding internal and external flow. Computational analysis was carried out using coupled CFD-FEM solvers with detailed models of the automobile topology and structural components. The experimental work consisted of wind tunnel tests using a full-scale production vehicle.
Journal Article

A Kinematic Modeling Framework for Prediction of Instantaneous Status of Towing Vehicle Systems

2018-04-18
Abstract A kinematic modeling framework was established to predict status (position, displacement, velocity, acceleration, and shape) of a towing vehicle system with different driver inputs. This framework consists of three components: (1) a state space model to decide position and velocity for the vehicle system based on Newton’s second law; (2) an angular acceleration transferring model, which leads to a hypothesis that the each towed unit follows the same path as the towing vehicle; and (3) a polygon model to draw instantaneous polygons to envelop the entire system at any time point.
Journal Article

Robust Design for Steering Mechanism Based on Preference Function

2018-03-01
Abstract In order to improve robustness of vehicle dynamic performance, a steering mechanism model is proposed with alignment parameters of front wheel based on preference function method. In the steering mechanism model controllable variables include the trapezoid connection length, the base angle of steering trapezoid, the kingpin inclination angle, caster, camber and uncontrollable variables include load and initial braking velocity. Optimization objective is some vehicle dynamic performance. In the preference function method the individual performance preference and preference aggregation in designing variable space and performance variable space are analyzed. The individual performance preference includes the controllable variable preference, noise factor preference and optimization objective preference. The aggregation function is developed by aggregating all the individual performance preferences.
Journal Article

Evaluation of the Energy Consumption of a Thermal Management System of a Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicle Using the Example of the Audi Q7 e-tron

2018-06-18
Abstract The transition of vehicle propulsion technologies away from conventional internal combustion engines toward more electrically dominant systems such as plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEV) poses new challenges for vehicle thermal management systems. Especially at low ambient temperatures, consumer demand for cabin comfort as well as legislatively imposed safety considerations significantly reduce the electric driving range because only electric energy can be used for heating during emissions-free driving modes. Recent developments to find energy efficient thermal management systems for electric and plug-in electric vehicles have led to the implementation of automotive heat pump systems. As an alternative approach to meet dynamic heating demands and safety regulations, these systems use heat at a low temperature level, for example the waste heat of electric drivetrain components, to heat the passenger compartment efficiently and therefore increase the electric driving range.
Journal Article

Design, Analysis, Simulation and Validation of Automobile Suspension System Using Drive-Shaft as a Suspension Link

2018-04-18
Abstract With increasing demands for higher performance along with lower vehicle emissions, lightweight vehicle system construction is key to meet such demands. Suspension and transmission assemblies being the key areas for weight-reduction, we have designed a revolutionary new type of suspension system which combines the suspension links with the powertrain assembly and thus completely eliminates one suspension member. Less weight means lower fuel-consumption with improved passenger-comfort and road-holding due to reduction in unsprung mass. Elimination of a suspension link reduces the overall cost of material, machining & fabrication making our design cost-effective than existing setups. This paper deals with the design and implementation of of our concept. A working prototype is also constructed and tested which completely validates our design.
Journal Article

Reduced-Order Modeling of Vehicle Aerodynamics via Proper Orthogonal Decomposition

2019-10-21
Abstract Aerodynamic optimization of the exterior vehicle shape is a highly multidisciplinary task involving, among others, styling and aerodynamics. The often differing priorities of these two disciplines give rise to iterative loops between stylists and aerodynamicists. Reduced-order modeling (ROM) has the potential to shortcut these loops by enabling aerodynamic evaluations in real time. In this study, we aim to assess the performance of ROM via proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) for a real-life industrial test case, with focus on the achievable accuracy for the prediction of fields and aerodynamic coefficients. To that end, we create a training data set based on a six-dimensional parameterization of a Volkswagen passenger production car by computing 100 variants with Detached-Eddy simulations (DES).
Journal Article

Overset Mesh-Based Computational Investigations on the Aerodynamics of a Generic Car Model in Proximity to a Side-Wall

2019-10-21
Abstract This article discusses an approach to simulating a generic idealized car model (Ahmed body) moving in close proximity to a side-wall, using a transient Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) method. This phenomenon is very important in motorsports, where racing close to the safety barrier is common. Driving in close proximity to a side-wall alters the aerodynamic characteristics of the vehicle significantly; however, only a handful of published works exist in this area. Additionally, the experimental studies conducted in the past suffer from certain inadequacies, especially in terms of simulating the side-wall. This casts some uncertainty as to the relevance of these studies to the real-world problem. The present study attempts to imitate the real-world flow phenomenon by taking a nontraditional CFD approach of translating the body relative to the stationary surrounding fluid and side-wall instead of the classical method of flowing air over a stationary vehicle model.
Journal Article

Vehicle Aerodynamic Optimization: On a Combination of Adjoint Method and Efficient Global Optimization Algorithm

2019-04-26
Abstract This article presents a workflow for aerodynamic optimization of vehicles that for the first time combines the adjoint method and the efficient global optimization (EGO) algorithm in order to take advantage of both the gradient-based and gradient-free methods for aerodynamic optimization problems. In the workflow, the adjoint method is first applied to locate the sensitive surface regions of the baseline vehicle with respect to the objective functions and define a proper design space with reasonable design variables. Then the EGO algorithm is applied to search for the optimal site in the design space based on the expected improvement (EI) function. Such workflow has been applied to minimize the aerodynamic drag for a mass-produced electric vehicle. With the help of STAR-CCM+ and its adjoint solver, sensitive surface regions with respect to the aerodynamic drag are first located on the vehicle.
Journal Article

A Combination of Intelligent Tire and Vehicle Dynamic Based Algorithm to Estimate the Tire-Road Friction

2019-04-08
Abstract One of the most important factors affecting the performance of vehicle active chassis control systems is the tire-road friction coefficient. Accurate estimation of the friction coefficient can lead to better performance of these controllers. In this study, a new three-step friction estimation algorithm, based on intelligent tire concept, is proposed, which is a combination of experiment-based and vehicle dynamic based approaches. In the first step of the proposed algorithm, the normal load is estimated using a trained Artificial Neural Network (ANN). The network was trained using the experimental data collected using a portable tire testing trailer. In the second step of the algorithm, the tire forces and the wheel longitudinal velocity are estimated through a two-step Kalman filter. Then, in the last step, using the estimated tire normal load and longitudinal and lateral forces, the friction coefficient can be estimated.
Journal Article

A Probabilistic Approach to Hydroplaning Potential and Risk

2019-01-30
Abstract A major contributor to fatal vehicle crashes is hydroplaning, which has traditionally been reported at a specific vehicle speed for a given operating condition. However, hydroplaning is a complex phenomenon requiring a holistic, probabilistic, and multidisciplinary approach. The objective of this article is to develop a probabilistic approach to predict Hydroplaning Potential and Risk that integrates fundamental understanding of the interdependent factors: hydrology, fluid-solid interactions, tire mechanics, and vehicle dynamics. A novel theoretical treatment of Hydroplaning Potential and Risk is developed, and simulation results for the prediction of water film thickness and Hydroplaning Potential are presented. The results show the advantages of the current approach which could enable the improvement of road, vehicle, and tire design, resulting in greater safety of the traveling public.
Journal Article

Improving Vehicle Rollover Resistance Using Fuzzy PID Controller of Active Anti-Roll Bar System

2018-12-20
Abstract The active anti-roll bar (AARB) system in vehicles has recently become one of the research hotspots in the field of vehicle technology to improve the vehicle’s active safety. In most off-road vehicles, high ground clearance is required while keeping all wheels in contact with the ground in order to improve traction and maintain load distribution among the wheels. A problem however arises in some types of the off-road vehicles when the vehicle is operated at high speeds on smooth roads. In such condition, the combination of the vehicle’s center of gravity position, large suspension stroke, and soft spring construction creates a stability problem, which could make the vehicle liable to rollover. This article analyzes a comparison of stability performance between passive and active anti-roll bar systems to improve rolling resistance. For active systems, two control strategies will be investigated. The conventional PID controller is firstly investigated and taken as a reference.
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