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Journal Article

Methodology for Developing a Diesel Exhaust After Treatment Simulation Tool

2017-09-16
Abstract A methodology for the development of catalyst models is presented. Also, a methodology of the implementation of such models into a modular simulation tool, which simulates the units in succession, is presented. A case study is presented illustrating how suitable models can be found and used for simulations. Such simulations illustrate the behavior of the individual units and the overall system. It is shown how, by simulating the units in succession, the entire after treatment system can be tested and optimized, because the integration makes it possible to observe the effect of the modules on one another.
Journal Article

Design, Analysis, and Optimization of a Multi-Speed Powertrain for Class-7 Electric Trucks

2018-04-17
Abstract The development, analysis, and optimization of battery electric class-7 heavy-duty trucks equipped with multi-speed transmissions are discussed in this paper. The designs of five new traction motors-fractional-slot, concentrated winding machines-are proposed for use in heavy-duty electric trucks. The procedure for gear-ratio range selection is outlined and ranges of gear ratios for three-to six-speed transmission powertrains are calculated for each of the proposed electric traction motors. The simulation and gear-ratio optimization tasks for class-7 battery electric trucks are formulated. The energy consumption of the e-truck with the twenty possible powertrain combinations is minimized over the four driving cycles and the most efficient powertrain layouts that meet the performance criteria are recommended.
Journal Article

On WTW and TTW Specific Energy Consumption and CO2 Emissions of Conventional, Series Hybrid and Fully Electric Buses

2018-04-17
Abstract Making use of a specifically designed dynamical vehicle model, the authors here presented the results of an activity for the evaluation of energy consumption and CO2 emissions of buses for urban applications. Both conventional and innovative (series hybrid, and fully electric) vehicles were considered to obtain interesting comparative conclusions. The derived tool was used to simulate the dynamical behaviour of these vehicles on a number of kinematic profiles measured during real buses operation in different contexts, varying from really congested city centre routes to fast-lane operated services. It was so possible to evaluate the energetic performances of those buses on a Tank-to-Wheel (TTW) basis.
Journal Article

Development of a Catalytic Converter Cool-Down Model to Investigate Intermittent Engine Operation in HEVs

2018-10-29
Abstract Catalytic converters, a primary component in most automotive emissions control systems, do not function well until they are heated substantially above ambient temperature. As the primary energy for catalyst heating comes from engine exhaust gases, plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) that have the potential for short and infrequent use of their onboard engine may have limited energy available for catalytic converter heating. This article presents a comparison of multiple hybrid supervisory control strategies to determine the ability to avoid engine cold starts during a blended charge-depleting propulsion mode. Full vehicle and catalytic converter simulations are performed in parallel with engine dynamometer testing in order to examine catalyst temperature variations during the course of the US06 City drive cycle. Emissions and energy consumption (E&EC) calculations are also performed to determine the effective number of engine starts during the drive cycle.
Journal Article

Carbon Monoxide Density Pattern Mapping from Recreational Boat Testing

2018-10-04
Abstract Exposure to carbon monoxide (CO) gas can cause health risks for users of recreational boats and watercraft. Activities such as waterskiing, wakeboarding, tubing, and wakesurfing primarily utilize gasoline engine-driven vessels which produce CO as a combustion by-product. Recent watersports trends show an increase in popularity of activities which take place closer to the stern of the boat (such as wakesurfing) as compared to traditional waterskiing and wakeboarding. Advancements in gas emissions treatment in marine engine exhaust system designs have reduced risks for CO exposure in some boats. This article presents results from on-water testing of three recreational boats, reports average and maximum values of CO levels under various conditions, and exhibits mapping of the density of CO relative to the stern of the test vessels.
Journal Article

Comparison of Regulated and Unregulated Emissions and Fuel Economy of SI Engines with Three Fuels: RON95, M15, and E10

2019-10-04
Abstract This article focuses on a comparative research of the emissions discharged from four vehicles equipped with SI engines, which comply with different emission control systems (Euro 6, Euro 5, and Euro 3). The vehicles used for this work were installed with two different fuel injection technologies (direct injection and port fuel injection) and were operated with three different types of fuels (RON 95, M15, and E10). The tests were performed at the Joint Research Center (JRC) in Ispra using a state-of-the-art emissions test facility according to the European emissions legislation. The test bench included a chassis dynamometer and two different driving cycles were used: NEDC and US06.
Journal Article

Modeling and Simulation of Refueling Emissions from Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles

2019-10-14
Abstract Vehicular evaporative emissions are an important source of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Moreover, the engines of plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) may not start for a long time, causing the activated carbon canister to not purge well in-use and to become saturated with fuel vapor. Therefore, the problems of evaporative emissions and refueling emissions of PHEVs are still severe. The objectives of this article are to model and simulate the refueling emissions from PHEVs to shorten the design and development cycle. To achieve the goals, the release of refueling emissions is divided into two stages: the depressurization stage and the refueling stage. The mathematical model has been established by means of the ideal gas law and the gas mass transfer and diffusion law. Then, the numerical model is built and the volume of fluid (VOF) model was applied in the simulation.
Journal Article

Numerical Investigation of the Characteristics of Spray/Wall Interaction with Hybrid Breakup Model by Considering Nozzle Exit Turbulence

2018-12-04
Abstract The spray/wall interaction plays a significant role on the mixture formation, combustion, and exhaust emissions. In the present study, the numerical code General Transport Equation Analysis (GTEA) is used to investigate the effect of fuel primary spray on the spray/wall interaction process. Taylor Analogy Breakup (TAB) model, Kelvin-Helmholtz-Rayleigh-Taylor (KH-RT) model, and Hybrid breakup (Hybrid) model are used to simulate the fuel spray process. By comparing the radius and height of the impinged spray, the performance of these breakup models is evaluated. Then, Bai and Gosman (BG) and Zhang and Jia (ZJ) spray/wall interaction models are implemented into GTEA code to describe the complicated spray/wall interaction process, and these interaction models are validated by the radius and height of the impinged spray and the size and velocity of the secondary droplets.
Journal Article

Finite Element Thermo-Structural Methodology for Investigating Diesel Engine Pistons with Thermal Barrier Coating

2018-12-14
Abstract Traditionally, in combustion engine applications, metallic materials have been widely employed due to their properties: castability and machinability with accurate dimensional tolerances, good mechanical strength even at high temperatures, wear resistance, and affordable price. However, the high thermal conductivity of metallic materials is responsible for consistent losses of thermal energy and has a strong influence on pollutant emission. A possible approach for reducing the thermal exchange requires the use of thermal barrier coating (TBC) made by materials with low thermal conductivity and good thermo-mechanical strength. In this work, the effects of a ceramic coating for thermal insulation of the piston crown of a car diesel engine are investigated through a numerical methodology based on finite element analysis. The study is developed by considering firstly a thermal analysis and then a thermo-structural analysis of the component.
Journal Article

The Key Role of Advanced, Flexible Fuel Injection Systems to Match the Future CO2 Targets in an Ultra-Light Mid-Size Diesel Engine

2019-01-23
Abstract The article describes the results achieved in developing a new diesel combustion system for passenger car application that, while capable of high power density, delivers excellent fuel economy through a combination of mechanical and thermodynamic efficiencies improvement. The project stemmed from the idea that, by leveraging the high fuel injection pressure of last generation common rail systems, it is possible to reduce the engine peak firing pressure (pfp) with great benefits on reciprocating and rotating components’ light-weighting and friction for high-speed light-duty engines, while keeping the power density at competitive levels. To this aim, an advanced injection system concept capable of injection pressure greater than 2500 bar was coupled to a prototype engine featuring newly developed combustion system. Then, the matching among these features has been thoroughly experimentally examined.
Journal Article

Homogeneous Charge Reactivity-Controlled Compression Ignition Strategy to Reduce Regulated Pollutants from Diesel Engines

2019-03-14
Abstract Reactivity-controlled compression ignition (RCCI) is a dual fuel low temperature combustion (LTC) strategy which results in a wider operating load range, near-zero oxides of nitrogen (NOx) and particulate matter (PM) emissions, and higher thermal efficiency. One of the major shortcomings in RCCI is a higher unburned hydrocarbon (HC) and carbon monoxide (CO) emissions. Unlike conventional combustion, aftertreatment control of HC and CO emissions is difficult to achieve in RCCI owing to lower exhaust gas temperatures. In conventional RCCI, an early direct injection (DI) of low volatile diesel fuel into the premixed gasoline-air mixture in the combustion chamber results in charge stratification and fuel spray wall wetting leading to higher HC and CO emissions. To address this limitation, a homogeneous charge reactivity-controlled compression ignition (HCRCCI) strategy is proposed in the present work, wherein the DI of diesel fuel is eliminated.
Journal Article

Extending the Range of Data-Based Empirical Models Used for Diesel Engine Calibration by Using Physics to Transform Feature Space

2019-03-14
Abstract A new method that allows data-enabled (empirical) models, commonly used for automotive engine calibration, to extrapolate beyond the range of training data has been developed. This method used a physics-based system-level one-dimensional model to improve interpolation and allow extrapolation for three data-based algorithms, by modifying the model input (feature) space. Neural network, regression, and k-nearest neighbor predictions of engine emissions and volumetric efficiency were greatly improved by generating 736,281 artificial feature spaces and then performing feature selection to choose feature spaces (feature selection) so that extrapolations in the original feature space were interpolations in the new feature space. A novel feature selection method was developed that used a two-stage search process to uniquely select the best feature spaces for every prediction.
Journal Article

A Comparison of EGR Correction Factor Models Based on SI Engine Data

2019-03-27
Abstract The article compares the accuracy of different exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) correction factor models under engine conditions. The effect of EGR on the laminar burning velocity of a EURO VI E10 specification gasoline (10% Ethanol content by volume) has been back calculated from engine pressure trace data, using the Leeds University Spark Ignition Engine Data Analysis (LUSIEDA) reverse thermodynamic code. The engine pressure data ranges from 5% to 25% EGR (by mass) with the running conditions, such as spark advance and pressure at intake valve closure, changed to maintain a constant engine load of 0.79 MPa gross mean effective pressure (GMEP). Based on the experimental data, a correlation is suggested on how the laminar burning velocity reduces with increasing EGR mass fraction.
Journal Article

Role of Piston Bowl Shape to Enhance Late-Cycle Soot Oxidation in Low-Swirl Diesel Combustion

2019-04-25
Abstract Late-cycle soot oxidation in heavy-duty (HD) diesel engine low-swirl combustion was investigated using single-cylinder engine and spray chamber experiments together with engine combustion simulations. The in-cylinder flow during interactions between adjacent flames (flame-flame events) was shown to have a large impact on late-cycle combustion. To modify the flame-flame flow, a new piston bowl shape with a protrusion (wave) was designed to guide the near-wall flow. This design significantly reduced soot emissions and increased engine thermodynamic efficiency. The wave’s main effect was to enhance late-cycle mixing, as demonstrated by an increase in the apparent rate of heat release after the termination of fuel injection. Combustion simulations showed that the increased mixing is driven by enhanced flow re-circulation, which produces a radial mixing zone (RMZ).
Journal Article

Performance, Fuel Economy, and Economic Assessment of a Combustion Concept Employing In-Cylinder Gasoline/Natural Gas Blending for Light-Duty Vehicle Applications

2019-04-25
Abstract In current production natural gas/gasoline bi-fuel vehicles, fuels are supplied via port fuel injection (PFI). Injecting a gaseous fuel in the intake port significantly reduces the volumetric efficiency and consequently torque as compared to gasoline. In addition to eliminating the volumetric efficiency challenge, direct injection (DI) of natural gas (NG) can enhance the in-cylinder flow, mixing, and combustion process resulting in improved efficiency and performance. A computational fluid dynamics (CFD) approach to model high-pressure gaseous injection was developed and validated against X-ray data from Argonne’s Advanced Photon Source. NG side and central DI of various designs and injection strategies were assessed experimentally along with CFD correlation. Significant effects on combustion metrics were quantified and explained via improved understanding of the in-cylinder flow effects due to NG injection.
Journal Article

Experimental Studies on Liquid Phase LPG Direct Injection on a Two-Stroke SI Engine

2019-05-31
Abstract Directly injecting fuel in two-stroke spark-ignition (2S-SI) engines will significantly reduce fuel short-circuiting losses. The liquid phase liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) DI (LLDI) mode has not been studied on 2S-SI engines even though this fuel is widely used for transportation. In this experimental work a 2S-SI gasoline-powered engine used on three-wheelers was modified to operate in LLDI mode with an electronic engine controller. The influences of injection pressure (IP), end of injection (EOI) timing, location of the spark plug, and type of injector on performance, combustion, and emissions were studied at different operating conditions. EOI close to bottom dead center with the spark plug located near the exhaust port was the most suitable for the LLDI mode which significantly enhanced the fuel trapping efficiency and improved the thermal efficiency.
Journal Article

Throat Unit Collector Modeling of Gasoline Particulate Filter Performance

2019-07-26
Abstract The wide application of Gasoline Direct Injection (GDI) engines and the increasingly stringent Particulate Matter (PM) and Particulate Number (PN) regulations make Gasoline Particulate Filters (GPFs) with high filtration efficiency and low pressure drop highly desirable. However, due to the specifics of GDI operation and GDI PM, the design of these filters is even more challenging as compared to their diesel counterparts. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) studies have been shown to be an effective way to investigate filter performance. In particular, our previous two-dimensional (2D) CFD study explicated the pore size and pore-size distribution effects on GPF filtration efficiency and pressure drop. The “throat unit collector” model developed in this study furthers this work in order to characterize the GPF wall microstructure more precisely.
Journal Article

Numerical Study of Pore Size and Distribution Effects on Gasoline Particulate Filter Performance

2019-08-22
Abstract The improved brake thermal efficiency of Gasoline Direct Injection (GDI) engines is accompanied by a significant increase in Particulate Matter (PM) mass and higher Particulate Number (PN) emissions as compared to (multi)Port Fuel Injected (PFI) engines. Gasoline particulate filters (GPFs) with high filtration efficiency and low backpressure will be required to meet the future, stringent PM/PN regulations. A two-dimensional (2D) CFD study was performed to determine the effects of pore size and distribution on the interdependent performance parameters of filtration efficiency and backpressure for clean GPFs. Simulation results show an on linear change infiltration efficiency as the pore size distribution tightens and determine a recommended distribution range, controlling the quantity of small-sized pores. Pore size distributions beyond this recommended range can cause a filtration performance loss or intolerable backpressure penalty for the GPF.
Journal Article

Response Surface Methodology (RSM) in Optimization of Performance and Exhaust Emissions of RON 97, RON 98, and RON 100 (Motor Gasoline) and AVGAS 100LL (Aviation Gasoline) in Lycoming O-320 Engine

2019-08-19
Abstract Federal Aviation Administration (FAA)’s 20 years of research and development with 200 unleaded blends and full-scale engine tests on 45 high-octane unleaded blends has not found a “drop-in” unleaded replacement for aviation gasoline (AVGAS) 100 low lead (100LL) fuel. In this study, analysis of compatibility via optimization of Lycoming O-320 engine fuelled with RON 97, RON 98, RON 100, and AVGAS was conducted using the Response Surface Methodology (RSM). Test fuels were compositionally characterized based on Gas Chromatography (GC) analysis and were categorized based on types of Hydrocarbon (HC). Basic fuel properties of fuels in this research were analyzed and recorded. For optimization analysis, engine speed and fuel were considered as the input parameters.
Journal Article

Low- to High-Temperature Reaction Transition in a Small-Bore Optical Gasoline Compression Ignition (GCI) Engine

2019-08-19
Abstract This study shows the development of low-temperature and high-temperature reactions in a gasoline-fuelled compression ignition (GCI) engine realizing partially premixed combustion for high efficiency and low emissions. The focus is how the ignition occurs during the low- to high-temperature reaction transition and how it varies due to single- and double-injection strategies. In an optically accessible, single-cylinder small-bore diesel engine equipped with a common-rail fuel injection system, planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) imaging of formaldehyde (HCHO-PLIF), hydroxyl (OH-PLIF), and fuel (fuel-PLIF) has been performed. This was complemented with high-speed imaging of combustion luminosity and chemiluminescence imaging of cool flame and OH*.
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