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Technical Paper

A Madymo Model of the Foot and Leg for Local Impacts

1999-10-10
99SC12
It has been reported that lower extremity injuries represent a measurable portion of all moderate-to-severe automobile crash- related injuries. Thus, a simple tool to assist with the design of leg and foot injury countermeasures is desirable. The objective of this study is to develop a mathematical model which can predict load propagation and kinematics of the foot and leg in frontal automotive impacts. A multi-body model developed at the University of Virginia and validated for blunt impact to the whole foot has been used as basis for the current work. This model includes representations of the tibia, fibula, talus, hindfoot, midfoot and forefoot bones. Additionally, the model provides a means for tensioning the Achilles tendon. In the current study, the simulations conducted correspond to tests performed by the Transport Research Laboratory and the University of Nottingham on knee-amputated cadaver specimens.
Technical Paper

Resistance Welding for Automotive Wiring Harness Connection - Small Gauge Cables

2012-10-02
2012-36-0153
Miniaturization is an important trend in many technology segments, once it can enable innovative applications generating new markets. This trend was begun in electronics industry after World War II and has spawned changes into automotive sector also. For Automotive Wiring Harness, miniaturization is clearly presented in most of the components, mainly because of its benefits like the potential of mass reduction, cost reduction and efficiency improvement. Furthermore the main voice of customer points to cable gauge reduction that represents a considerable challenge for connection manufacturing process due to quality control limitations presented by conventional crimp process for 0,35 [mm₂] cables and smaller. According to that, the scope of this article is to present, in details, a manufacturing process optimization for an alternative and more robust technology of joining copper stranded cables to tin brass terminals used on automotive wiring harness, Resistance Welding.
Technical Paper

Automotive Miniaturization Trend: Challenges for Wiring Harness Manufacturing

2010-10-06
2010-36-0160
One of the most evident trends in automotive sector is miniaturization. It is related to considerable benefits due to the potential of mass reduction, cost reduction and efficiency improvement. It involves many different automobile components and most of them are facing challenges to achieve the targets defined by car makers and final consumers. Specifically for wiring harness, it seems to be many manufacturing and process challenges to be surpassed in order to fully perceive the benefits expected with miniaturization, internally and externally. So this article aims to present an overview of literature as well as reporting of experts on this issue mentioning some of the challenges that global automotive wiring harness manufacturers are facing. Subjects as assembly automation, terminal connection and small gauge cables are discussed in the article and also a general overview of how those problems are being addressed in order to meet customer requirements.
Technical Paper

Development of an Analytical Tool for Multilayer Stack Assemblies

2011-10-06
2011-28-0083
The development of an analytical model for multilayer stack subjected to temperature change is demonstrated here. Thin continuous layers of materials bonded together deform as a plate due to their differing coefficients of thermal expansion upon subjecting the bonded materials to the change in temperature. Applications of such structures can be found in the electronics industry (the study of warpage issues in printed circuit boards) or in the aerospace industry as (the study of laminated thin sheets used as skin structures for load bearing members such as wings and fuselage). In automotive electronics, critical high-power packages (IGBT, Power FETs) include several layers of widely differing materials (aluminum, solder, copper, ceramics) subjected to wide temperature cyclic ranges. Modeling of such structures by using three-dimensional finite element methods is usually time consuming and may not exactly predict the inter-laminar strains.
Technical Paper

Thermal Comfort Prediction and Validation in a Realistic Vehicle Thermal Environment

2012-04-16
2012-01-0645
The focus of this study is to validate the predictive capability of a recently developed physiology based thermal comfort modeling tool in a realistic thermal environment of a vehicle passenger compartment. Human subject test data for thermal sensation and comfort was obtained in a climatic wind tunnel for a cross-over vehicle in a relatively warm thermal environment including solar load. A CFD/thermal model that simulates the vehicle operating conditions in the tunnel, is used to provide the necessary inputs required by the stand-alone thermal comfort tool. Comparison of the local and the overall thermal sensation and comfort levels between the human subject test and the tool's predictions shows a reasonably good agreement. The next step is to use this modeling technique in designing and developing energy-efficient HVAC systems without compromising thermal comfort of the vehicle occupants.
Journal Article

Solder Void Modeling and Its Influence on Thermal Characteristics of MOSFETs in Automotive Electronics Module

2017-03-28
2017-01-0011
Current generation automobiles are controlled by electronic modules for performing various functions. These electronic modules have numerous semiconductor devices mounted on printed circuit boards. Solders are generally used as thermal interface material between surface mount devices and printed circuit boards (PCB) for efficient heat transfer. In the manufacturing stage, voids are formed in solders during reflow process due to outgassing phenomenon. The presence of these voids in solder for power packages with exposed pads impedes heat flow and can increase the device temperature. Therefore it is imperative to understand the effect of solder voids on thermal characteristics of semiconductor devices. But the solder void pattern will vary drastically during mass manufacturing. Replicating the exact solder void pattern and doing detail simulation to predict the device temperature for each manufactured module is not practical.
Journal Article

Model-Based Development of AUTOSAR-Compliant Applications: Exterior Lights Module Case Study

2008-04-14
2008-01-0221
The complexity of automotive software and the needs for shorter development time and software portability require the development of new approaches and standards for software architectures. The AUTOSAR project is one of the most comprehensive and promising solutions for defining a methodology supporting a function-driven development process. Furthermore, it manifests itself as a standard for expressing compatible software interfaces at the Application Layer. This paper discusses the implementation of AUTOSAR requirements for the component structure, as well as interfaces to the Application Layer in a model-based development environment. The paper outlines the major AUTOSAR requirements for software components, provides examples of their implementation in a Simulink/Stateflow model, and describes the modelbased implementation of an operating system for running AUTOSAR software executables (“runnables”).
Technical Paper

Thermal Electric Analysis of Bond Wires Used in Automotive Electronic Modules

2015-04-14
2015-01-0195
Bond wires are used in automotive electronic modules to carry current from external harness to components where flexibility under thermal cyclic loading is very essential between PCB (Printed Circuit Board) and connectors. They are very thin wires (few μm) made up of gold, aluminum or copper and have to undergo mechanical reliability to withstand extreme mechanical and thermal loads during different vehicle operation scenarios. Thermal reliability of bond wire is to make sure that it can withstand prescribed electric current under given boundary conditions without fusing thereby retaining electronic module's functionality. While carrying current, bond wire by virtue of its nature resists electric current flow and generates heat also called as joule heating. Joule heating is proportional to current flow and electrical resistance and if not handled properly can lead to thermal run away conditions.
Journal Article

Energy Efficient HVAC System with Spot Cooling in an Automobile - Design and CFD Analysis

2012-04-16
2012-01-0641
Spot, or distributed, cooling and heating is an energy efficient way of delivering comfort to an occupant in the car. This paper describes an approach to distributed cooling in the vehicle. A two passenger CFD model of an SUV cabin was developed to obtain the solar and convective thermal loads on the vehicle, characterize the interior thermal environment and accurately evaluate the fluid-thermal environment around the occupants. The present paper focuses on the design and CFD analysis of the energy efficient HVAC system with spot cooling. The CFD model was validated with wind tunnel data for its overall accuracy. A baseline system with conventional HVAC air was first analyzed at mid and high ambient conditions. The airflow and cooling delivered to the driver and the passenger was calculated. Subsequently, spot cooling was analyzed in conjunction with a much lower conventional HVAC airflow.
Technical Paper

Development of Electrical-Electronic Controls for a Gasoline Direct Injection Compression Ignition Engine

2016-04-05
2016-01-0614
Delphi is developing a new combustion technology called Gasoline Direct-injection Compression Ignition (GDCI), which has shown promise for substantially improving fuel economy. This new technology is able to reuse some of the controls common to traditional spark ignition (SI) engines; however, it also requires several new sensors and actuators, some of which are not common to traditional SI engines. Since this is new technology development, the required hardware set has continued to evolve over the course of the project. In order to support this development work, a highly capable and flexible electronic control system is necessary. Integrating all of the necessary functions into a single controller, or two, would require significant up-front controller hardware development, and would limit the adaptability of the electronic controls to the evolving requirements for GDCI.
Technical Paper

The Assembly Deformation and Pressure of Stuffed Catalytic Converter Accounting for the Hysteresis Behavior of Pressure vs Density Curve of the Intumescent Mat

2000-03-06
2000-01-0223
Accurately predicting converter assembly deformation and mat pressure is essential in converter packaging design and manufacturing. In stuffing packaging, the annulus between the deformed shell and the catalyst is larger than that between the stuffing cone and the catalyst. As a result, the mat expands and undergoes unloading process. Tests show that the mat exhibits different loading and unloading characteristics. Using such a hysteresis mat pressure vs density curve in finite element analysis, the computed converter deformations closely agree with test data. Conversly, neglecting the mat hysteresis behavior may overestimate the deformation and pressure by a factor of three to four.
Technical Paper

Barometric Pressure Estimator for Production Engine Control and Diagnostics

1999-03-01
1999-01-0206
A Barometric Pressure Estimator (BPE) algorithm was implemented in a production speed-density Engine Management System (EMS). The BPE is a model-based, easily calibrated algorithm for estimating barometric pressure using a standard set of production sensors, thereby avoiding the need for a barometric pressure sensor. An accurate barometric pressure value is necessary for a variety of engine control functions. By starting with the physics describing the flow through the induction system, an algorithm was developed which is simple to understand and implement. When used in conjunction with the Pneumatic and Thermal State Estimator (PSE and TSE) algorithms [2], the BPE requires only a single additional calibration table, generated with an automated processing routine, directly from measured engine data collected at an arbitrary elevation, in-vehicle or on a dynamometer. The algorithm has been implemented on several different engines.
Technical Paper

Sensory Evaluation of Commercial Truck Interiors

1999-03-01
1999-01-1267
Vehicle interior harmony is related to human factors but it deals with human emotional attachment to the product. Kansei, or sensory engineering provides an effective approach to address harmony issues. This paper reports a preliminary investigation of human sensory evaluation of commercial truck interiors, especially the door interiors. To investigate the end users' needs and preference, a questionnaire survey was administered to twenty-six commercial truck drivers. Responses on usability, styling, harmony, and ergonomics issues of each driver's own truck were recorded. Furthermore, a set of 12 semantic differential scales, together with a preference ranking scale, was served to evaluate six truck door interiors. Results show that commercial truck drivers are more concerned with functionality and usability than styling and visual harmony.
Technical Paper

Numerical Prediction of Brake Fluid Temperature Rise During Braking and Heat Soaking

1999-03-01
1999-01-0483
Long repetitive braking, such as one which occurs during a mountain descent, will result in a brake fluid temperature rise and may cause brake fluid vaporization. This may be a concern particularly for passenger cars equipped with aluminum calipers and with a limited air flow to the wheel brake systems. This paper describes the computer modeling techniques to predict the brake fluid temperature rise as well as other brake component temperatures during braking and heat soaking. Numerical results are compared to the measured vehicle data and the effects of relevant brake system parameters on the fluid temperature are investigated. The techniques developed in this study will help brake engineers to build a safer brake system and reduce the extensive vehicle tests currently required.
Technical Paper

Non-Linear Dynamic Analysis of a SuperPlug™ Door Module Response to a Door Slam Event

1999-03-01
1999-01-0406
The SuperPlug™ door module is a new Delphi innovation. It is a one-piece composite structure, which integrates several door components into one assembly. This reduces the total part count, simplifies the vehicle level assembly process, and reduces labor cost (see the Appendix). The door slam durability test is an important factor in door module design. As more hardware is integrated into the SuperPlug, this subsystem performance in a door slam test becomes important. Therefore, the correct placement of components and the supporting structure is critical. Currently, the evaluation of door slam durability for the SuperPlug is a process of build then test. This is time consuming and costly due to a long testing lead-time and the expense of tooling a new mold. It was realized that a numerical process for assessing the effect of door slam would be required. This process would compute the dynamic response using finite element analysis (FEA).
Technical Paper

Individual Cylinder Fuel Control with a Switching Oxygen Sensor

1999-03-01
1999-01-0546
In this paper we discuss in detail an algorithm that addresses cylinder-to-cylinder imbalance issues. Maintaining even equivalence-ratio (ϕ) control across all the cylinders of an engine is confounded by imbalances which include fuel-injector flow variations, fresh-air intake maldistribution and uneven distribution of Exhaust Gas Re-circulation (EGR). Moreover, in markets that are growing increasingly cost conscious, with ever tightening emissions regulations, correcting for such mismatches must not only be done, but done at little or no additional cost. To address this challenge, we developed an Individual Cylinder Fuel Control (ICFC) algorithm that estimates each cylinder's individual ϕ and then compensates to correct for any imbalance using only existing production hardware. Prior work in this area exists1,2, yet all disclosed production-intent work was performed using wide-range oxygen sensors, representing cost increases.
Technical Paper

Driver Injuries in US Single-Event Rollovers

2000-03-06
2000-01-0633
The purpose of this paper is to investigate occupant injuries which may be sustained during a single-event crash with known roll mechanism. The data was obtained from the weighted National Automotive Sampling System/ Crashworthiness Data System (NASS-CDS) for calendar years 1992 to 1996. The effect of number of rollover turns, roll direction, ejection and belt usage on driver injury responses was analyzed in single-event trip-overs. Trip-overs were chosen for the analysis because they account for over 50% of rollover crashes. The number of rollovers was divided in 3 categories: ¼ to ½ turn, ¾ to 1 turn and above 1 turn. Roll direction was either roll-left or a rollright along the longitudinal axis of the vehicle. Roll-left represents a roll with the driver side leading, while a roll right is with the right front passenger side leading. In the database used in this study, there were three times more belted drivers than unbelted.
Technical Paper

Diagnostic Development for an Electric Power Steering System

2000-03-06
2000-01-0819
Electric power steering (EPS) is an advanced steering system that uses an electric motor to provide steering assist. Being a new technology it lacks the extensive operational history of conventional steering systems. Also conventional systems cannot be used to command an output independent of the driver input. In contrast EPS, by means of an electric motor, could be used to do so. As a result EPS systems may have additional failure modes, which need to be studied. In this paper we will consider the requirements for successful EPS operation. The steps required to develop diagnostics based on the requirements are also discussed. The results of this paper have been implemented in various EPS-based programs.
Technical Paper

Estimation of Vehicle Side Slip Angle and Yaw Rate

2000-03-06
2000-01-0696
An algorithm for estimation of vehicle yaw rate and side slip angle using steering wheel angle, wheel speed, and lateral acceleration sensors is proposed. It is intended for application in vehicle stability enhancement systems, which use controlled brakes or steering. The algorithm first generates two initial estimates of yaw rate from wheel speeds and from lateral acceleration. A new estimate is subsequently calculated as a weighted average of the two initial ones, with the weights proportional to confidence levels in each estimate. This preliminary estimate is fed into a closed loop nonlinear observer, which generates the final estimate of yaw rate along with estimates of lateral velocity and side slip angle. Parameters of the observer depend on the estimated surface coefficient of adhesion, thus providing adaptation to changes in road surface coefficient of adhesion.
Technical Paper

System Modeling of A Damper Module

2000-03-06
2000-01-0727
A recent trend within the automotive industry has been an emphasis on the development of modular assemblies for future vehicle applications. This trend has created a need for the development of methods to predict the performance of modules within the vehicle environment. In particular, the development of system models that account for the interactions between components within a modular assembly is necessary to insure that a module is properly designed. This paper describes a finite element system model of a damper module as installed in a McPherson strut front suspension. The modeling techniques used to construct the components within the modular assembly are discussed. The results of a study of the structural behavior of a damper module model subjected to quasi-static loading conditions are presented. Additionally, the effects of changes in individual component specifications on the overall system response are considered and the results are displayed.
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