Refine Your Search

Topic

Author

Search Results

Technical Paper

Immediate Impacts on Particulate and Gaseous Emissions from a T56 Turbo-Prop Engine Using a Biofuel Blend

2013-09-17
2013-01-2131
Adoption of hydro-processed esters and fatty acid biojet fuels is a critical component for the sustainability of the aviation industry. Aviation biofuels reduce pollution and provide alternatives to conventional fossil fuels. A study of the impacts of biofuels on emissions from a T56 turbo-prop engine was undertaken as a joint effort among several departments of the Government of Canada. In this study, particulate (including particle number and black carbon (BC) mass) and regulated gaseous emissions (CO2, CO, NO, NO2, THC) were characterized with the engine operating on conventional F-34 jet fuel and jet fuel blended with camelina-based hydro-processed biojet fuel (C-HEFA) by 50% in volume. Emissions characterization, conducted after 20-hour ground engine durability tests, showed immediate significant reductions in particle number and BC mass when the engine was operated on the C-HEFA blend.
Technical Paper

Ice-Crystal Icing Accretion Studies at the NASA Propulsion Systems Laboratory

2019-06-10
2019-01-1921
This paper describes an ice-crystal icing experiment conducted at the NASA Propulsion System Laboratory during June 2018. This test produced ice shape data on an airfoil for different test conditions similar to those inside the compressor region of a turbo-fan jet engine. Mixed-phase icing conditions were generated by partially freezing out a water spray using the relative humidity of flow as the primary parameter to control freeze-out. The paper presents the ice shape data and associated conditions which include pressure, velocity, temperature, humidity, total water content, melt ratio, and particle size distribution. The test featured a new instrument traversing system which allowed surveys of the flow and cloud. The purpose of this work was to provide experimental ice shape data and associated conditions to help develop and validate ice-crystal icing accretion models.
Technical Paper

The Influence of SLD Drop Size Distributions on Ice Accretion in the NASA Icing Research Tunnel

2019-06-10
2019-01-2022
An ice shape database has been created to document ice accretions on a 21-inch chord NACA0012 model and a 72-inch chord NACA 23012 airfoil model resulting from an exposure to a Supercooled Large Drop (SLD) icing cloud with a bimodal drop size distribution. The ice shapes created were documented with photographs, laser scanned surface measurements over a section of the model span, and measurement of the ice mass over the same section of each accretion. The icing conditions used in the test matrix were based upon previously used conditions on the same models but with an alternate approach to evaluation of drop distribution effects. Ice shapes resulting from the bimodal distribution as well as from equivalent monomodal drop size distributions were obtained and compared.
Technical Paper

Radar Detection of High Concentrations of Ice Particles - Methodology and Preliminary Flight Test Results

2019-06-10
2019-01-2028
High Ice Water Content (HIWC) has been identified as a primary causal factor in numerous engine events over the past two decades. Previous attempts to develop a remote detection process utilizing modern commercial radars have failed to produce reliable results. This paper discusses the reasons for previous failures and describes a new technique that has shown very encouraging accuracy and range performance without the need for any modifications to industry’s current radar design(s). The performance of this new process was evaluated during the joint NASA/FAA HIWC RADAR II Flight Campaign in August of 2018. Results from that evaluation are discussed, along with the potential for commercial application, and development of minimum operational performance standards for future radar products.
Technical Paper

Measurement of Liquid Water Content for Supercooled Large Drop Conditions in the NRC’s Altitude Icing Wind Tunnel

2019-06-10
2019-01-2007
As a result of new regulations pertaining to the airworthiness of aircraft exposed to in-flight icing conditions where maximum water drop size is greater than 100 microns (referred to as Supercooled Large Droplet (SLD) conditions), updates are required to the test facilities and simulations that will enable manufactures to certify their products under these new rules. While a number of facilities report achieving some of the conditions specified in the new regulations, questions remain as to the suitability of the instrumentation used to measure the Liquid Water Content (LWC) and drop size distributions of the SLD icing cloud. This study aims to provide baseline LWC data through ice accretion measurement techniques on a NACA 0012 airfoil and rotating cylinders of varying diameters.
Technical Paper

Testing of Elastomer Icephobic Coatings in the AIWT: Lessons Learned

2019-06-10
2019-01-1994
A study has been conducted into icephobic properties of some highly durable “off-the-shelf” elastomer materials using a rotating ice adhesion test rig installed in the NRC’s Altitude Icing Wind Tunnel. This enabled the formation of ice at environmental conditions similar to those experienced during in-flight icing encounters. Initially, the tests indicated some very positive results with ice adhesion shear stress as low as 8KPa. On further examination, however, it became apparent that the test preparation process, in which the samples were cleaned with an ethanol alcohol solution, influenced the results due to absorption and prolonged retention of the cleaning fluid. The uptake of the ethanol alcohol solution by the elastomer was found to be a function of the surface temperature and remained absorbed into the coating during the ice accretion process changing the characteristics of the coating in such a way that led to a reduction in the ice/surface bond strength.
Technical Paper

Measured Interfacial Residual Strains Produced by In-Flight Ice

2019-06-10
2019-01-1998
The formation of ice on aircraft is a highly dynamic process during which ice will expand and contract upon freezing and undergoing changes in temperature. Finite element analysis (FEA) simulations were performed investigating the stress/strain response of an idealized ice sample bonded to an acrylic substrate subjected to a uniform temperature change. The FEA predictions were used to guide the placement of strain gages on custom-built acrylic and aluminum specimens. Tee rosettes were placed in two configurations adjacent to thermocouple sensors. The specimens were then placed in icing conditions such that ice was grown on top of the specimen. It was hypothesized that the ice would expand on freezing and contract as the temperature of the interface returned to the equilibrium conditions.
Technical Paper

Analysis and Automated Detection of Ice Crystal Icing Conditions Using Geostationary Satellite Datasets and In Situ Ice Water Content Measurements

2019-06-10
2019-01-1953
Recent studies have found that high mass concentrations of ice particles in regions of deep convective storms can adversely impact aircraft engine and air probe (e.g. pitot tube and air temperature) performance. Radar reflectivity in these regions suggests that they are safe for aircraft penetration, yet high ice water content (HIWC) is still encountered. The aviation weather community seeks additional remote sensing methods for delineating where ice particle (or crystal) icing conditions are likely to occur, including products derived from geostationary (GEO) satellite imagery that is now available in near-real time at increasingly high spatio-temporal detail from the global GEO satellite constellation.
Technical Paper

Four Years of Testing to AS5562

2019-06-10
2019-01-1957
With the publication of SAE AS5562 in 2015, icing wind tunnel test facilities have upgraded their operating environments and instrumentation to meet the client demand to test to this new standard. Nearing four years of testing and development to this standard, numerous questions and challenges have arisen that industry has addressed on an individual basis but not in a common format for all. This paper addresses some of the known challenges in an effort to apply AS5562 consistently across industry and provide clarity to all users.
Technical Paper

Icing Test and Measurement Capabilities of the NRC’s Gas Turbine Laboratory

2019-06-10
2019-01-1943
The National Research Council’s Gas Turbine Laboratory provides industry leading icing facilities that allow manufacturers to develop, validate and certify new products for flight in adverse conditions. This paper shows how NRC measurement techniques are used across the facilities, and presents a literature-review of recently developed capabilities. The overview includes new details on some facilities, and future capabilities that are in development or planned for the near future. Methods developed at the NRC for characterizing inclement conditions are discussed and include the Isokinetic Probe, Particle Shadow Velocimetry, the Particle Detection Probe, and a size-binned real-time thermodynamic evaporation model.
Technical Paper

Validation and Instrumentation of a Small Modular Multi-Stage Axial Compressor for Ice Crystal Icing Research

2019-06-10
2019-01-1940
The National Research Council of Canada (NRC) has undergone the development of a Small Axial Compressor Rig for modelling altitude ice accretion in aircraft engines. The rig consists of two axial compressor stages measuring approximately 150mm in diameter, an extension duct to allow residence time for partial melting of ice crystals and a test piece. The axial compressor stages are intended to provide realistic engine conditioning such as fracture, pressure rise, temperature rise and centrifuging of glaciated ice crystals entering the rig. The rig was designed for use in altitude icing wind tunnels such as the NRC’s altitude icing wind tunnel (AIWT), research altitude test facility (RATFac.), and those of other organization such as NASA Glenn and Technical University of Braunshweig. Previous development work [1] provided partial validation of the aerodynamic performance of just the first compressor stage at 90% power.
Technical Paper

NRC Particle Detection Probe: Results and Analysis from Ground and Flight Tests

2019-06-10
2019-01-1933
High altitude ice crystals are causing in-service events in excess of one per month for commercial aircraft. The effects include air data probes malfunctioning (pitot pressure and total air temperature in particular), and uncommanded engine power loss or flameout events. The National Research Council Canada (NRC) has developed a particle detection probe (PDP) that mounts on the fuselage of aircraft to sense and quantify the ice crystals in the environment. The probe is low-power and non-intrusive. This paper presents the results of ground and flight testing of this probe. Results are presented for ground testing in a sea level ice crystal wind tunnel and an altitude icing tunnel capable of generating both ice crystal and super-cooled liquid. The PDP was operated on several flight campaigns and the results of two will be presented.
Technical Paper

Ice Crystal Icing Test Design and Execution for the ALF502 Vane Segment in the NRC RATFac Cascade Rig

2019-06-10
2019-01-1925
Understanding the behaviour of ice crystal ice (ICI) accretion and shedding inside an aircraft engine is important for safe and reliable engine operation in flight and to meet new airworthiness regulations. A significant advancement in this understanding came from two engine test campaigns carried out on a Honeywell ALF502 turbofan, led by the Ice Crystal Consortium (ICC) and NASA. However, it is often desirable to conduct smaller scale component level tests to both decrease costs and increase the amount of data obtainable, given a component is more accessible when removed from an engine and therefore easier to instrument and observe. That was the purpose of the work discussed in this paper where a segment of an ALF502 low pressure exit guide vane ring was installed in the NRC RATFac ICI cascade rig. The existing cascade rig was modified to accommodate the vane segment which allowed for the instrumentation already available on the rig to be used to characterize the ICI environment.
Technical Paper

Experimental Aerodynamic Simulation of Glaze Ice Accretion on a Swept Wing

2019-06-10
2019-01-1987
Aerodynamic assessment of icing effects on swept wings is an important component of a larger effort to improve three-dimensional icing simulation capabilities. An understanding of ice-shape geometric fidelity and Reynolds and Mach number effects on iced-wing aerodynamics is needed to guide the development and validation of ice-accretion simulation tools. To this end, wind-tunnel testing was carried out for 8.9% and 13.3% scale semispan wing models based upon the Common Research Model airplane configuration. Various levels of geometric fidelity of an artificial ice shape representing a realistic glaze-ice accretion on a swept wing were investigated. The highest fidelity artificial ice shape reproduced all of the three-dimensional features associated with the glaze ice accretion. The lowest fidelity artificial ice shapes were simple, spanwise-varying horn ice geometries intended to represent the maximum ice thickness on the wing upper surface.
Technical Paper

Evaluation of Visual Failure versus Aerodynamic Limit for a Snow Contaminated Anti-Iced Wing Section during Simulated Takeoff

2019-06-10
2019-01-1972
Under contract to Airlines for America (A4A), APS Aviation Inc. (APS), in collaboration with the National Research Council of Canada (NRC), completed an aircraft ground icing exploratory research project at the NRC 3 m × 6 m Wind Tunnel in Ottawa in January 2019. The purpose of this project was to investigate the feasibility of using aerodynamic data to evaluate the performance of contaminated anti-icing fluid, rather than the traditional visual fluid failure indicators that are used to develop Holdover Times (HOTs). The aerodynamic performance of a supercritical airfoil model with anti-icing fluids and snow contamination was evaluated against the clean, dry performance of the airfoil in order to calculate the associated aerodynamic penalty. The visual failure of the fluid was also evaluated for each run, and the visual and aerodynamic results were compared against each other for each contamination exposure time.
Technical Paper

Ice Particle Analysis of the Honeywell ALF502 Engine Booster

2015-06-15
2015-01-2131
A flow and ice particle trajectory analysis was performed for the booster of the Honeywell ALF502 engine. The analysis focused on two closely related conditions one of which produced an icing event and another which did not during testing of the ALF502 engine in the Propulsion Systems Lab (PSL) at NASA Glenn Research Center. The flow analysis was generated using the NASA Glenn GlennHT flow solver and the particle analysis was generated using the NASA Glenn LEWICE3D v3.63 ice accretion software. The inflow conditions for the two conditions were similar with the main differences being that the condition that produced the icing event was 6.8 K colder than the non-icing event case and the inflow ice water content (IWC) for the non-icing event case was 50% less than for the icing event case.
Technical Paper

Performance Modeling of Honeywell Turbofan Engine Tested with Ice Crystal Ingestion in the NASA Propulsion System Laboratory

2015-06-15
2015-01-2133
The Propulsion Systems Laboratory (PSL) altitude test facility at NASA Glenn Research Center, has been used to test a full scale Honeywell turbofan engine at simulated altitude operating conditions. The PSL has spray bars to create a continuous cloud of fully glaciated ice crystals. The tests successfully duplicated the icing events that were experienced by the Honeywell engine (ALF502R-5) during flight through ice crystal clouds. After the ice cloud was turned on key engine performance parameters such as the fan speed, air flow rate, fuel flow rate, and compressor exit pressure and temperature responded immediately to the ingestion of the ice crystals. For some of the test points, these performance parameters remained unchanged from the initial response to the ice crystals, while during other test points the engine performance began to deteriorate to the point where an uncommanded loss of thrust control (engine rollback) was judged by the test engineers to have been imminent.
Technical Paper

Three Dimensional Simulation of Flow in an Axial Low Pressure Compressor at Engine Icing Operating Points

2015-06-15
2015-01-2132
Three-dimensional simulations of the Honeywell ALF502 low pressure compressor (sometimes called a booster) using the NASA Glenn code GlennHT have been carried out. A total of eight operating points were investigated. These operating points are at, or near, points where engine icing has been determined to be likely. The results of this study were used, in a companion paper, for further analysis such as predicting collection efficiency of ice particles and ice growth rates at various locations in the compressor. In an effort to minimize computational effort, inviscid solutions with slip walls are produced. A mixing plane boundary condition is used between each blade row, resulting in convergence to steady state within each blade row. Comparisons of the results are made to other simplified analysis. An additional modification to the simulation process is also presented.
Technical Paper

Technique for Ice Crystal Particle Size Measurements and Results for the National Research Council of Canada Altitude Ice Crystal Test System

2015-06-15
2015-01-2125
This paper describes the equipment, analysis methods and results obtained for particle size measurements based on a particle imaging velocimetry (PIV) system in which a short duration laser pulse is used to backlight airborne particles. This produces high quality and high resolution images of fast moving airborne particles in a non-intrusive manner. This imaging technique is also used to examine particle morphology and 2D particle trajectory and velocity. The image analysis methods are outlined and validation test results discussed which show the measurement of reference glass beads between 20 and 400 microns were generally to within their stated size. As well, validation testing using known icing wind tunnel droplet distributions were compared with Spraytek 2000 Malvern droplet size measurements and showed agreement of the MVD's to be within ±5% for distributions having nominally 20, 40 and 80 micron MVD's.
Technical Paper

Development and Application of an Impedance-Based Instrument for Measuring the Liquid Fraction and Thickness of Ice Crystal Accretions

2015-06-15
2015-01-2134
Ice crystals ingested by a jet engine at high altitude can partially melt and then accrete within the forward stages of the compressor, potentially causing performance loss, damage and/or flameout. Recent research into this ice crystal icing (ICI) phenomenon conducted at the National Research Council of Canada suggests that the liquid water content vliq of an accretion significantly affects the accretion's susceptibility to erosion by ice crystals, and therefore accretion growth. This paper describes the development and application of an instrument for measuring vliq, potentially providing a method for correlating erosion behavior (e.g. as ductile or brittle) and properties. The instrument measures the complex admittance Y* of a mixed-phase deposit bridging a pair of electrodes, which is modeled as a resistor and capacitor in parallel, and calculates the deposit's relative permittivity εr from the capacitance.
X