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Standard

Lubricating Oils, Aircraft Piston Engine (Non-Dispersant Mineral Oil)

1991-06-01
HISTORICAL
J1966_199106
This SAE Standard establishes the requirements for lubricating oils containing ashless dispersant additives to be used in four-stroke cycle, reciprocating piston aircraft engines. This document covers the same lubricating oil requirements as the former military specification MIL-L-22851. Users should consult their airframe or engine manufacturers manuals for the latest listing of acceptable lubricants.
Standard

Lubricating Oils, Aircraft Piston Engine (Non-Dispersant Mineral Oil)

1989-12-01
HISTORICAL
J1966_198912
This SAE Standard establishes the requirements for lubricating oils containing ashless dispersant additives to be used in four-stroke cycle, reciprocating piston aircraft engines. This document covers the same lubricating oil requirements as the former military specification MIL-L-22851. Users should consult their airframe or engine manufacturers manuals for the latest listing of acceptable lubricants.
Standard

Lubricating Oils, Aircraft Piston Engine (Non-Dispersant Mineral Oil)

2011-08-22
CURRENT
J1966_201108
This SAE Standard establishes the requirements for nondispersant, mineral lubricating oils to be used in four-stroke cycle piston aircraft engines. This document covers the same lubricating oil requirements as the former military specification MIL-L-6082. Users should consult their airframe or engine manufacturers manuals for the latest listing of acceptable lubricants.
Standard

Lubricating Oils, Aircraft Piston Engine(Non-Dispersant Mineral Oil)

2000-06-08
HISTORICAL
J1966_200006
This SAE Standard establishes the requirements for nondispersant, mineral lubricating oils to be used in four-stroke cycle piston aircraft engines. This document covers the same lubricating oil requirements as the former military specification MIL-L-6082. Users should consult their airframe or engine manufacturers manuals for the latest listing of acceptable lubricants.
Standard

Lubricating Oils, Aircraft Piston Engine (Non-Dispersant Mineral Oil)

2005-07-31
HISTORICAL
J1966_200507
This SAE Standard establishes the requirements for nondispersant, mineral lubricating oils to be used in four-stroke cycle piston aircraft engines. This document covers the same lubricating oil requirements as the former military specification MIL-L-6082. Users should consult their airframe or engine manufacturers manuals for the latest listing of acceptable lubricants.
Book

Fuel Cell Systems Explained, Second Edition

2003-05-01
Fuel cell technology is developing at a rapid pace, thanks to the increasing awareness of the need for pollution-free power sources. Moreover, new developments in catalysts and improved reliability have made fuel cells viable candidates in a road range of applications, from small power stations, to cars, to laptop computers and mobile phones. Building on the success of the first edition, Fuel Cell Systems Explained presents a balanced introduction to this growing area. "In summary, an altogether satisfying book that puts within its covers the academic tools necessary for explaining fuel cell systems on a multidisciplinary basis." - Power Engineering Journal "An excellent book...well written and produced."- Journal of Power and Energy
Book

Energy Harvesting/Regeneration for Electric Vehicles Land, Water & Air 2015-2025

2014-12-01
The electric vehicle industry - land, water and air - is rapidly rising to become a market of over $533 billion by 2025. Some run entirely on harvested energy as with solar lake boats. Others recycle energy as with regenerative braking of cars, buses and military vehicles harvesting kinetic energy. Others use different forms of harvesting either to charge the traction batteries, or to drive autonomous device. In some cases, harvesting is making completely new forms of electric vehicle possible such as "glider" Autonomous Underwater Vehicles (AUVs) that can stay at sea for years, gaining electricity from both wave power and sunshine. Multiple forms of energy harvesting on one vehicle are becoming more common from cars to superyachts.
Book

Range Extenders for Electric Vehicles Land, Water & Air 2015-2025

2014-10-01
Half the electric vehicle market value lies in larger road vehicles, notably cars, and here the legal restrictions are weaker or non-existent, and range anxiety compels most people to buy hybrids if they go electric at all. Over eight million hybrid cars will be made in 2025, each with a range extender, the additional power source that distinguishes them from pure electric cars. Add to that significant money spent on the same devices in buses, military vehicles, boats and so on and a major new market emerges. Whereas today's range extenders usually consist of little more than off- the- shelf internal combustion engines, these are rapidly being replaced by second- generation range extenders consisting of piston engines designed from scratch for fairly constant load. However, a more radical departure is the third- generation micro turbines and fuel cells that work at constant load.
Book

Electric Motors for Hybrid and Pure Electric Vehicles 2015-2025: Land, Water, Air

2014-11-01
The electric vehicle business will approach a massive $500 billion in 2025 with the traction motors segment capturing over $25 billion. Traction motors propelling land, water and air vehicles along can consist of one inboard motor or - an increasing trend - more than one near the wheels, in the wheels, in the transmission or ganged to get extra power. Complex trends in this industry are explained with this updated report, and future winning suppliers are identified alongside market forecasts. The information is especially important as hybrid vehicles may have the electric motor near the conventional engine or its exhaust, and this may mean they need to tolerate temperatures never before encountered in pure electric vehicles. Motors for highly price-sensitive markets such as electric bikes, scooters, e-rickshaws and micro EVs avoid the price hikes of neodymium and other rare earths in the magnets.
Standard

Aircraft Turbine Engine Fuel System Component Endurance Test Procedure (Room Temperature Contaminated Fuel)

2015-08-24
CURRENT
MAP749C
This SAE Aerospace Recommended Practice describes a method for conducting room temperature, contaminated fuel, endurance testing when the applicable specification requires nonrecirculation of the contaminants. The objective of the test is to determine the resistance of engine fuel system components to wear or damage caused by contaminated fuel operation. It is not intended as a test for verification of the component's filter performance and service life. ARP1827 is recommended for filter performance evaluation.
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