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Technical Paper

Spectroscopic Measurement of OH Radical Emission Behavior Using a 2-Cycle Engine

1997-10-27
978515
The aim of this research was to investigate the mechanism causing autoignition and the effect of exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) on combustion by detecting the behavior of the OH radical and other excited molecules present in the flame in a spark ignition engine. The test equipment used was a 2-cycle engine equipped with a Schnürle scavenging system. Using emission spectroscopy, the behavior of the OH radical was measured at four locations in the end zone of the combustion chamber. The OH radical plays an important role in the elemental reactions of hydrocarbon fuels. When a certain level of EGR was applied according to the engine operating conditions, the unburned gas became active owing to heat transfer from residual gas near the measurement positions on the exhaust port side and the influence of excited species in the residual gas, and autoignition tended to occur.
Technical Paper

An Experimental Study Concerning the influence of Hot Residual Gas On Combustion

2000-01-15
2000-01-1419
This research focused on the light emission behavior of the OH radical (characteristic spectrum of 306.4 [nm]) that plays a key role in combustion reactions, in order to investigate the influence of the residual gas on autoignition. Authors also analyzed on the heat release and thermodynamic mean temperature due to research activity state of unburned gas. The test engine used was a 2-stroke, air-cooled engine fitted with an exhaust pressure control valve in the exhaust manifold. Raising the exhaust pressure forcibly recirculated more exhaust gas internally. When a certain level of internal EGR is forcibly applied, the temperature of the unburned end gas is raised on account of heat transfer from the hot residual gas and also due to compression by piston motion. As a result, the unburned end gas becomes active and autoignition tends to occur.
Technical Paper

7 Experimental Research Concerning the Effect of the Scavenging Passage Length on the Combustion State and Exhaust Gas Composition of a Small Two-stroke Engine

2002-10-29
2002-32-1776
This paper presents the results of experiments conducted with a two-stroke engine that was the world's first such engine to comply with the emissions regulations applied to small off-road engines by the U.S. state of California in 2000. This engine is fitted with a scavenging passage that runs around the crankcase before the scavenging port. The aim of this research was to investigate how changes in the quantity of heat transferred to the fresh air as a result of varying the length of the scavenging passage would affect the state of combustion and exhaust gas composition. An ion probe was fitted to the end zone of the combustion chamber in order to detect the state of combustion. A voltage of 60 V was applied to the ion probe and measurements were made of the voltage drop that occurred due to the presence of high concentrations of ions (H3O+, C3H3+, CHO+, etc.) at the flame front.
Technical Paper

Clarification of OH Radical Emission Intensity During Autoignition in a 2-Stroke Spark Ignition Engine

1998-10-19
982481
This research focused on the light emission behavior of the OH radical (characteristic spectrum of 306.4 nm) that plays a key role in combustion reactions, in order to investigate the influence of the residual gas on autoignition. The test engine used was a 2-stroke, air-cooled engine fitted with an exhaust pressure control valve in the exhaust manifold. When a certain level of internal EGR is forcibly applied, the temperature of the unburned end gas is raised on account of heat transfer from the hot residual gas and also due to compression by piston motion. As a result, the unburned end gas becomes active and autoignition tends to occur.
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