Refine Your Search

Topic

Author

Affiliation

Search Results

Standard

xEV Labels to Assist First and Second Responders, and Others

2017-03-02
CURRENT
J3108_201703
This recommended practice prescribes clear and consistent labeling methodology for communicating important xEV high voltage safety information. Examples of such information include identifying key high voltage system component locations and high voltage disabling points. These recommendations are based on current industry best practices identified by the responder community. Although this recommended practice is written for xEVs with high voltage systems, these recommendations can be applied to any vehicle type.
Standard

Selection of Transmission Media

2000-02-23
CURRENT
J2056/3_200002
This SAE Information Report studies the present transmission media axioms and takes a fresh look at the Class C transmission medium requirements and also the possibilities and limitations of using a twisted pair as the transmission medium. The choice of transmission medium is a large determining factor in choosing a Class C scheme.
Standard

Jump Start Connections for 42 Volt Electrical Systems

2011-02-18
CURRENT
J2651_201102
This SAE Recommended Practice defines test methods and general requirements at all phases of development, production, and field analysis of electrical terminals (including sense pins), connectors, and components that constitute the jump-start connection for road vehicles having 42 V (nominal) electrical systems. The 42 V jump start connector is always remote from the vehicle battery and may take the form of an in-line or Header Connection, either of which is in an accessible location for attachment of a jumper cable from an assist vehicle or battery charger. WARNING—The Jump Start Connector requires environmental protection. This specification assumes that such protection is in place and remains effective for the life of the vehicle. The level of protection depends on the vehicle packaging environment and duty cycle. Appendix B of this document contains the physical specification for the Jump Start Connector.
Standard

Jump Start Connections for 42 Volt Electrical Systems

2005-03-16
HISTORICAL
J2651_200503
This SAE Standard defines test methods and general requirements at all phases of development, production, and field analysis of electrical terminals (including sense pins), connectors, and components that constitute the jump-start connection for road vehicles having 42 V (nominal) electrical systems. The 42 V jump start connector is always remote from the vehicle battery and may take the form of an in-line or Header Connection, either of which is in an accessible location for attachment of a jumper cable from an assist vehicle or battery charger. WARNING--The Jump Start Connector requires environmental protection. This specification assumes that such protection is in place and remains effective for the life of the vehicle. The level of protection depends on the vehicle packaging environment and duty cycle. Appendix B of this document contains the physical specification for the Jump Start Connector.
Standard

Vehicle System Voltage—Initial Recommendations

1999-06-04
CURRENT
J2232_199906
This SAE Information Report is a summary of the initial recommendations of the SAE committee on Dual/Higher Voltage Vehicle Electrical Systems regarding the application of higher voltages in vehicle systems. This document does not attempt to address the technical merits of specific voltages or electrical system architectures.
Standard

Distributed Lighting Systems (DLS)

2011-02-24
CURRENT
J2282_201102
This SAE Recommended Practice applies to motor vehicle Distributed Lighting Systems (DLS) which use light generated by remote sources. It provides test methods, requirements, and guidelines applicable to these systems. This document is intended to be a guide to standard practice and is subject to change dependent upon additional experience and technical advances. This document covers Headlamp, Fog lamp, Auxiliary lamp, plus Signal and Marking lamp functions.
Standard

Discharge Signal Lighting System

2012-10-15
CURRENT
J2320_201210
This SAE Recommended Practice applies to motor vehicle signaling and marking devices which use light generated by a discharge source. This document provides test methods, requirements, and guidelines applicable to the unique characteristics of discharge lighting systems and their components. These are in addition to those required for signal and marking devices. This document is intended to be a guide to standard practice and is subject to change to reflect additional experience and technical advances.
Standard

Auxiliary Power Unit Electrical Interface Requirements for Class Eight Trucks

2010-07-06
HISTORICAL
J2891_201007
This SAE Recommended Practice covers the design and application of a 120 VAC single phase engine based auxiliary power unit or GENSET. This document is intended to provide design direction for the single phase nominal 120 VAC as it interfaces within the truck architecture providing power to truck sleeper cab hotel loads so that they may operate with the main propulsion engine turned off.
Standard

Auxiliary Power Unit Electrical Interface Requirements for Class Eight Trucks

2015-12-18
CURRENT
J2891_201512
This SAE Recommended Practice covers the design and application of a 120 VAC single phase engine based auxiliary power unit or GENSET. This document is intended to provide design direction for the single phase nominal 120 VAC as it interfaces within the truck architecture providing power to truck sleeper cab hotel loads so that they may operate with the main propulsion engine turned off.
Video

Development of a Hybrid Control Strategy for an Advanced Parallel HEV Powertrain with Two Electrical Axles

2012-05-29
This paper proposes a current limits distribution control strategy for a parallel hybrid electric vehicle (parallel HEV) which includes an advanced powertrain concept with two electrical driving axles. One of the difficulties of an HEV powertrain with two electrical driving axles is the ability to distribute the electrical current of one high voltage battery appropriately to the two independent electrical motors. Depending on the vehicle driving condition (i.e., car maneuver) or the maximization of the entire efficiency chain of the system, a suitable control strategy is necessary. We propose an input-output feedback linearization strategy to cope with the nonlinear system subject to input constraints. This approach needs an external, state dependent saturation element, which translates the state dependent control input saturation to the new feedback linearizing input and therefore preserves the properties of the differential geometric framework.
Technical Paper

Thermal Management Evolution and Controlled Coolant Flow

2001-05-14
2001-01-1732
A tremendous amount of research has been done on the coolant system of engines, however, the configuration remains virtually the same since the early 1900's. Recent testing has shown that by controlling components such as thermostats and water pumps, efficiency and emission improvements can be realized. With the nearing of higher voltage and hybrid systems, along with the availability of high efficiency electric pumps and valves, we are fast approaching the implementation of controlled coolant flow technology. This paper will discuss the problems with the current cooling systems, some of the work that has been done recently and what an ideal controlled coolant system may look like in the future.
Technical Paper

Development of Discharge Headlamp Ballast by Applying Hybrid IC Technology

2001-03-05
2001-01-0856
The popularity of discharge headlamps is increasing due to their higher luminous output and lower power consumption as compared with halogen headlamps. Discharge headlamps require a control unit called a “ballast” which ignites the lamp through high voltage discharge and controls power for the lamp during normal operation. Because there is limited space around the headlamp area and the total headlamp mass must be kept to a minimum, size and mass reduction were the key considerations in our ballast development efforts. Applying our in-house hybrid IC (integrated circuit) technology, we have developed a new, smaller ballast. As a result, we have achieved a ballast size and weight that is half that of the current design. This paper summarizes our technology and approach to the development of this new ballast.
Technical Paper

Maximum Electrical Energy Availability With Reasonable Components

2000-11-01
2000-01-C071
The electric power required in automotive systems is quickly reaching a level that significantly impacts costs and fuel consumption. This drives the need to reconsider an electric energy management function. Fast evolving factors such as increasing power usage, and stricter engine management and reliability requirements necessitate a global vehicle approach to energy management. Innovations such as new powernet concepts (42 volt or dual voltage systems), new component technologies (high-performance energy storage, high efficiency and controllable generators), and global electronic and software architecture concepts will enable this new energy management concept. This paper describes key issues to maximize energy availability with reasonable components.
Technical Paper

Development of a More Efficient and Higher Power Generation Technology for Future Electrical Systems

2000-11-01
2000-01-C081
Segment conductor technology can reduce the resistance of the stator winding by 50%, and noise sources can be cancelled through the dual winding and dual rectifier arrangement. This technology provides the generator with not only high power and efficiency but also low acoustic noise and electrical noise. This technology, combined with the switching rectifier technology, will be adopted into all charging systems including the conventional type, the high voltage type, and starting/engine-assist type.
X