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Standard

Disposition of Landing Gear Components Involved in Accidents/Incidents

2011-10-20
CURRENT
ARP4915B
This document establishes a procedure for disposition of landing gear components that have been involved in accidents/incidents. The recommendations in this document apply to components made of ferrous and non-ferrous alloys. The recommendations in this document do not apply to components made of non metallic composite materials.
Standard

Recommended Actions When Disinfectants, De-icers, and Cleaners Come in Contact with Landing Gear Structure

2006-04-20
HISTORICAL
AIR5541
This SAE Aerospace Information Report (AIR) advises that some of the chemicals being used to disinfect, de-ice, and clean airplanes can cause corrosion and/or degradation of landing gear components. Landing gear equipment includes shock struts, braces, actuators, wheels, brakes, tires, and electrical components. Some of the chemicals that have been recognized as potentially injurious are identified and recommendations for mitigating damage are presented.
Standard

Recommended Actions When Disinfectants, De-icers, and Cleaners Come in Contact with Landing Gear Structure

2012-10-03
CURRENT
AIR5541A
This SAE Aerospace Information Report (AIR) advises that some of the chemicals being used to disinfect, de-ice, and clean airplanes can cause corrosion and/or degradation of landing gear components. Landing gear equipment includes shock struts, braces, actuators, wheels, brakes, tires, and electrical components. Some of the chemicals that have been recognized as potentially injurious are identified and recommendations for mitigating damage are presented.
Standard

Development and Qualification of Composite Landing Gears

2010-10-07
CURRENT
AIR5552
This information report provides general guidance for the design considerations, qualification in endurance, strength and fatigue of landing gear using composite components as principle structural elements. The information discussed herein includes the development and evaluation of design data considering: the potential for imbedded manufacturing defects, manufacturing process variations, the component operating environment, potential damage threats in service, rework and overhaul, and inspection processes. This AIR mainly discusses the use of thick composites for landing gear structural components. Considerations and recommendations provided in this AIR may therefore differ greatly from considerations and recommendations found in widely accepted composite design references such as CMH-17 and Advisory Circulars such as AC 20-107(B).
Standard

Plain Bearing Selection for Landing Gear Applications

2018-04-18
CURRENT
AIR1594D
This document is intended to give advisory information for the selection of plain bearings and bearing materials most suitable for aircraft landing gear applications. Information included herein was derived from bearing tests and service experience/reports. Airframe/landing gear manufacturers, commercial airlines, the U.S. Air Force and Naval Air Systems Command provided input for the document. Information is given on bearing installation methods and fits that have given satisfactory performance and service life. Base metal corrosion is a major cause of problems in bearing installations for landing gears. Therefore, methods of corrosion prevention are discussed. Effort is directed toward minimizing maintenance and maximizing life expectancy of landing gear bearings. Lubricated and self-lubricating bearings are also discussed. There are wide ranges of bearing load and motion requirements for applications in aircraft landing gears.
Standard

CRACK INITIATION AND GROWTH CONSIDERATIONS FOR LANDING GEAR STEEL WITH EMPHASIS ON AERMET 100

1997-06-01
HISTORICAL
AIR5052
Steel alloys, such as AF1410 (AMS 6527, UNS K92571) and AerMet 100 (AMS 6532), have been developed which have improved Fracture Toughness characteristics compared to the current landing gear steel alloy, 300M (AMS 6419 and AMS 6257, MIL-S-8844, UNS K44220). The 300M steel is the most widely used material in current landing gear designs. It has been successfully used in thousands of applications. The use of the 300M material necessitates a safe life design criterion where components are retired after one-fourth to one-sixth the laboratory test life. This criterion was established in part due to the relatively low fracture toughness of low-alloy steel in the 260 to 300 ksi strength range. The high fracture tough alloys give comparable strength levels with an increase in fracture toughness and better resistance to stress corrosion cracking. These alloys may make possible the consideration of new procedures for operation, maintenance, and inspection.
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