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Standard

Vision Factors Considerations in Rearview Mirror Design

2009-02-13
HISTORICAL
J985_200902
The design and location of rear-viewing mirrors or systems, and the presentation of the rear view to the driver can best be achieved if the designer and the engineer have adequate references available on the physiological functions of head and eye movements and on the perceptual capabilities of the human visual system. The following information and charts are provided for this purpose. For more complete information of the relationship of vision to forward vision, see SAE SP-279.
Standard

Vision Factors Considerations in Rearview Mirror Design

2016-11-07
CURRENT
J985_201611
The design and location of rear-viewing mirrors or systems, and the presentation of the rear view to the driver can best be achieved if the designer and the engineer have adequate references available on the physiological functions of head and eye movements and on the perceptual capabilities of the human visual system. The following information and charts are provided for this purpose. For more complete information of the relationship of vision to forward vision, see SAE SP-279.
Standard

Crane and Cable Excavator Basic Operating Control Arrangements

1998-10-01
CURRENT
J983_199810
This SAE Recommended Practice applies to mobile, construction type, crane and cable excavator hand and foot controls. It should not be construed to limit the use of, or to apply to combination controls, automatic controls, or any other special operating control requirements.
Standard

Guidelines for Evaluating Child Restraint System Interactions with Deploying Airbags

2011-02-24
CURRENT
J2189_201102
This SAE Information Report prescribes dummies, procedures, and configurations that can be used for investigating the interactions that might occur between a deploying airbag and a child restrained by a child restraint system (CRS). During the inflation process, airbags generate a considerable amount of kinetic energy which can result in substantial forces being applied to a child who is restrained in a CRS in the front seat of a vehicle. Field data collected by the special crash investigation team of the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) indicate that fatal forces can be developed. In response to these field data, NHTSA added a series of airbag/child interaction tests and limits to the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR 571.208) that deal with occupant protection, commonly known as Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards (FMVSS 208).
Standard

Truck and Bus Lane Departure Warning Systems Test Procedure

2015-07-30
HISTORICAL
J3045_201507
This SAE recommended practice establishes a uniform, powered vehicle T.P. for lane departure warning systems used in highway trucks and buses greater than 4,546 kg (10,000 lb) GVW. Systems similar in function but different in scope and complexity, including Lane Keeping/Lane Assist and Merge Assist, are not included in this T.P. This T.P. does not apply to trailers, dollies, etc. This T.P. does not intend to exclude any particular system or sensor technology. The specification will test the functionality of the LDWS (e.g., ability to detect lane presence, and ability to detect an unintended lane departure), its ability to indicate LDWS engagement, its ability to indicate LDWS disengagement, and determine the point at which the LDWS notifies the Human Machine Interface (HMI) or vehicle control system that a lane departure event is detected. The HMI is not addressed herein, but is considered in SAE Standard J2808.
Standard

Truck and Bus Lane Departure Warning Systems Test Procedure and Minimum Performance Requirements

2018-08-28
CURRENT
J3045_201808
This SAE Recommended Practice establishes a uniform, powered vehicle test procedure and minimum performance requirement for lane departure warning systems used in highway trucks and buses greater than 4546 kg (10000 pounds) GVW. Systems similar in function but different in scope and complexity, including Lane Keeping/Lane Assist and Merge Assist, are not included in this document. This document does not apply to trailers, dollies, etc. This document does not intend to exclude any particular system or sensor technology. The specification will test the functionality of the LDWS (e.g., ability to detect lane presence, and ability to detect an unintended lane departure), its ability to indicate LDWS engagement, its ability to indicate LDWS disengagement, and determine the point at which the LDWS notifies the Human Machine Interface (HMI) or vehicle control system that a lane departure event is detected.
Standard

MANUAL CONTROLS FOR MATURE DRIVERS

1997-10-01
CURRENT
J2119_199710
Since little data exists to provide appropriate values for control parameters that would be appropriate for mature drivers, the following recommendations are of a general nature. However, they are based upon the current understanding of the aging processes that characterize mature drivers. Notwithstanding the lack of an extensive amount of data in this field, the dissemination of this SAE Information Report is considered to be appropriate and timely in light of the large increase in the number of mature drivers on the public roads, and because of the need to at least initiate efforts toward developing an information report covering this issue. It is realized that there may be cases where specific recommendations may conflict with vehicle packaging and/or operational requirements. Deviation from the recommendations may be necessary and permissible to achieve the best overall system performance.
Standard

Vehicle and Control Modifications for Drivers with Physical Disabilities Terminology

2001-01-29
CURRENT
J2094_200101
The terms included in this SAE Information Report have been collected during the development of SAE documents related to standards for the adaptation of vehicles for use by persons with physical disabilities. It includes only those terms that are pertinent to the adaptive devices discipline, leaving to other authorities more common automotive engineering terms. Where several terms have a common meaning in the practice, the Terminology Task Force has attempted to select the most appropriate term. The Terminology Task Force recognizes that there will be a need to expand and update current terminology as advances in the industry occur, and as related standards documents are completed. Accordingly, they will continue to develop and maintain this document to reflect those changes.
Standard

Impulse Noise from Automotive Inflatable Devices

2011-03-06
HISTORICAL
J2531_201103
New methods are available to assist in evaluating the risk of impulse noise-induced hearing loss from inflatable devices, for example, airbags and seat belt pretensioners. This document presents some background on impulse noise measurement techniques and assessment criteria. Related information relative to test details, for example, preamplifier specifications and filtering methods and criteria, will be discussed in a future recommended practice.
Standard

Impulse Noise from Automotive Inflatable Devices

2016-04-29
CURRENT
J2531_201604
New methods are available to assist in evaluating the risk of impulse noise-induced hearing loss from inflatable devices, for example, airbags and seat belt pretensioners. This document presents some background on impulse noise measurement techniques and assessment criteria. Related information relative to test details, for example, preamplifier specifications and filtering methods and criteria, will be discussed in a future recommended practice.
Standard

Navigation and Route Guidance Function Accessibility While Driving

2004-08-10
HISTORICAL
J2364_200408
This document applies to both Original Equipment Manufacturer and aftermarket route-guidance and navigation system functions for passenger vehicles. It establishes two alternative procedures, a static method and an interrupted vision method, for determining which navigation and route guidance functions should be accessible to the driver while the vehicle is in motion. These methods apply only to the presentation of visual information and the use of manual control inputs to accomplish a navigation or route guidance task. The document does not apply to visual monitoring tasks which do not require a manual control input, such as route following. Voice-activated controls or passenger operation of controls are also excluded. There are currently no compelling data that would support the extension of this document to in-vehicle systems other than navigation systems.
Standard

Cab Sleeper Occupant Restraint System Test

1989-03-01
HISTORICAL
J1948_198903
This SAE Recommended Practice provides a standardized test procedure for heavy-duty truck sleeper berth restraints to determine whether they meet the FMCSR.76 requirements. This document was developed to determine if a truck sleeper berth restraint is adequate to sustain a predetermined maximum horizontal load such as required by FMCSR regulation 393.76(h).
Standard

Cab Sleeper Occupant Restraint System Test

2003-03-25
HISTORICAL
J1948_200303
This SAE Recommended Practice provides a standardized test procedure for heavy-duty truck sleeper berth restraints to determine whether they meet the FMCSR 393.76 requirements. Purpose This document was developed to determine if a truck sleeper berth restraint is adequate to sustain a predetermined maximum horizontal load such as required by FMCSR regulation 393.76(h).
Standard

Vehicle and Control Modifications for Drivers with Physical Disabilities Terminology

1991-06-01
HISTORICAL
J2094_199106
The terms included in this SAE Information Report have been collected during the development of SAE documents related to standards for the adaptation of vehicles for use by persons with physical disabilities. It includes only those terms that are pertinent to the adaptive devices discipline, leaving to other authorities more common automotive engineering terms. Where several terms have a common meaning in the practice, the Terminology Task Force has attempted to select the most appropriate term. The Terminology Task Force recognizes that there will be a need to expand and update current terminology as advances in the industry occur, and as related standards documents are completed. Accordingly, they will continue to develop and maintain this document to reflect those changes.
Book

Two-Wheelers, Micro-EVs (Quadricycles), Mobility for Disabled 2013-2023

2014-11-01
This report looks closely at global trends in light electric vehicles’ (LEVs) technology, manufacture and market drivers such as legislation and the fact that several Chinese cities are banning or severely restricting LEVs. In the last few years, nearly every nation has bought ebikes from China, and in some cases, the volumes are now significant. Sales will reach 130 million yearly before 2025, making it one of the world's largest industries. The report encompasses over 70 brands, and gives forecasts of sales numbers, unit prices and total market value for 2013-2023. A significant percentage of ebikes sold are scooters in that they have the driver's feet rest on a platform - they are not straddled by the driver. Today, the LEV industry is dominated by large bicycle companies, due to their access to distribution. In the future, these companies will face major competition, and may be pushed aside by car, motorcycle, and car parts companies.
Book

Vehicle Occupant Restraint Systems: Trends, Companies, Market Forecasts to 2020

2012-07-01
With an ever greater value placed on safety by consumers, vehicle manufacturers around the world are rushing to develop new and innovative safety systems. The average safety content per vehicle has risen 17% since 2004 to around $270 per car in 2012. And this figure is set to grow, both in the established markets of North America, Western Europe and Japan, as well as the developing markets such as China and Brazil. But although the prospects look good for the major suppliers of conventional and advanced occupant safety systems, increasing unit growth will be partly offset by strong pricing pressure from vehicle manufacturers. Brand new research on automotive vehicle occupant restraint systems The 2012 edition of this report reviews the key market drivers for vehicle occupant restraint systems, extending and updating the analysis originally published in 2004, as well as reviewing the trends in the intervening eight years.
Book

Global Engine Trends & Forecasts to 2020

2012-11-01
In this second edition the key market drivers for petrol, diesel and hybrid engine trends are reviewed, to extend and update the analysis originally published in 2008, and re-evaluate the trends in the intervening four years. It provides an authoritative overview of both the technology issues (both present and future), and regulatory (emissions) concerns involved with this sector. Drivers and forecasts for global engine trends through to 2020 are identified, and data is provided by region for petrol, diesel and Hybrid/EV engine production. The research also highlights consumer trends in engine buying, explaining how the three main developed-market areas have evolved remarkably different consumer preferences.
Book

Green Technologies and Active Safety in the Mobility Industry

2011-09-12
This set includes two books, edited by Delphi's Chief Technology Officer Dr. Andrew Brown, Jr., which explore some of the most significant challenges currently facing the automotive industry-building green and safer vehicles. "Green Technologies and the Mobility Industry" and "Active Safety and the Mobility Industry" each include 20 SAE technical papers on their respective topics, originally published from 2009 through 2011. Green Technologies and the Mobility Industry Covers a wide range of subjects showcasing how the industry is developing greener products and keeping up with-if not staying ahead of-new standards and regulations. Active Safety and the Mobility Industry Details the latest innovations and trends in active safety technology and driver distraction prevention techniques. Buy a Combination of Books and Save!
Standard

Definitions and Data Sources for the Driver Vehicle Interface (DVI)

2015-12-03
CURRENT
J3077_201512
This document provides a summary of the activities to-date of Task Force #1 - Research Foundations – of the SAE’s Driver Vehicle Interface (DVI) committee. More specifically, it establishes working definitions of key DVI concepts, as well as an extensive list of data sources relevant to DVI design and the larger topic of driver distraction.
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