Refine Your Search

Topic

Author

Affiliation

Search Results

Standard

Lubricating Oils, Aircraft Piston Engine (Non-Dispersant Mineral Oil)

1991-06-01
HISTORICAL
J1966_199106
This SAE Standard establishes the requirements for lubricating oils containing ashless dispersant additives to be used in four-stroke cycle, reciprocating piston aircraft engines. This document covers the same lubricating oil requirements as the former military specification MIL-L-22851. Users should consult their airframe or engine manufacturers manuals for the latest listing of acceptable lubricants.
Standard

Lubricating Oils, Aircraft Piston Engine (Non-Dispersant Mineral Oil)

1989-12-01
HISTORICAL
J1966_198912
This SAE Standard establishes the requirements for lubricating oils containing ashless dispersant additives to be used in four-stroke cycle, reciprocating piston aircraft engines. This document covers the same lubricating oil requirements as the former military specification MIL-L-22851. Users should consult their airframe or engine manufacturers manuals for the latest listing of acceptable lubricants.
Standard

Lubricating Oils, Aircraft Piston Engine(Non-Dispersant Mineral Oil)

2000-06-08
HISTORICAL
J1966_200006
This SAE Standard establishes the requirements for nondispersant, mineral lubricating oils to be used in four-stroke cycle piston aircraft engines. This document covers the same lubricating oil requirements as the former military specification MIL-L-6082. Users should consult their airframe or engine manufacturers manuals for the latest listing of acceptable lubricants.
Standard

Lubricating Oils, Aircraft Piston Engine (Non-Dispersant Mineral Oil)

2005-07-31
HISTORICAL
J1966_200507
This SAE Standard establishes the requirements for nondispersant, mineral lubricating oils to be used in four-stroke cycle piston aircraft engines. This document covers the same lubricating oil requirements as the former military specification MIL-L-6082. Users should consult their airframe or engine manufacturers manuals for the latest listing of acceptable lubricants.
Standard

Refrigerant 12 Automotive Air-Conditioning Hose

2015-04-21
CURRENT
J51_201504
This SAE Standard covers reinforced hose, or hose assemblies, intended for conducting liquid and gaseous dichlorodifluoromethane (refrigerant 12) in automotive air-conditioning systems. The hose shall be designed to minimize permeation of refrigerant 12 and contamination of the system and to be serviceable over a temperature range of −30 to 120 °C (−22 to 248 °F). Specific construction details are to be agreed upon between user and supplier.1 NOTE—R12 refrigerant has been placed on a banned substance list due to its ozone depletion characteristics. SAE J51 specification will be phased out as new automotive A/C systems are using R134a. SAE J2064 is the Standard for refrigerant 134a hose. For refrigerant 134a use, refer to SAE J2064.
Standard

SAE MANUAL ON BLAST CLEANING

1968-06-01
CURRENT
J792A_196806
Blast cleaning may be defined as a secondary manufacturing process in which a suitable stream of solid particles is propelled with sufficient velocity against a work surface to cause a cleaning or abrading action when it comes in contact with the workpiece. As indicated in the definition, blast cleaning may be employed for a variety of purposes. Ordinarily, it is considered as a method for removing sand from castings, burrs or scale from forgings, mill products, or heat treated parts; to promote machinability, and to minimize the possibility of interference in actual operation. In addition to this use, blast cleaning also produces an excellent surface for industrial coatings. All these objectives are often accomplished in the one operation.
Standard

Spark Arrester Test Carbon

2013-03-26
CURRENT
J997_201303
This SAE Standard establishes physical properties required of SAE Coarse Test Carbon and SAE Fine Test Carbon and establishes test methods to ensure that these requirements are met.
Book

The Electric and Hybrid Electric Car

2001-11-01
This book examines trends in electric car development from a global perspective, with many examples drawing from the author's own experiences in the American and European automotive industries. Beginning with the scientific discoveries that made electric vehicle technology possible at the outset of the 20th century, author Michael H. Westbrook provides a thorough discussion of the technology's early history. Though initially overtaken by the unstoppable rise of the internal combustion engine, interest in electric vehicles began to reappear in the 1960s due to their low-emissions potential. But it was not until the passage of a California law in 1990 mandating the sale of zero-emissions vehicles (ZEVs) that major automakers began serious development of the technology.
Book

Fuel Cell Systems Explained, Second Edition

2003-05-01
Fuel cell technology is developing at a rapid pace, thanks to the increasing awareness of the need for pollution-free power sources. Moreover, new developments in catalysts and improved reliability have made fuel cells viable candidates in a road range of applications, from small power stations, to cars, to laptop computers and mobile phones. Building on the success of the first edition, Fuel Cell Systems Explained presents a balanced introduction to this growing area. "In summary, an altogether satisfying book that puts within its covers the academic tools necessary for explaining fuel cell systems on a multidisciplinary basis." - Power Engineering Journal "An excellent book...well written and produced."- Journal of Power and Energy
Standard

Fuel Injection Equipment Nomenclature

1999-04-21
HISTORICAL
J830_199904
This SAE Standard establishes a vocabulary and definitions relating to the components used in fuel injection systems for compression ignition (diesel) engines. Definitions are separated into six sections by topic as follows: Section 3— Fuel Injection Pumps Section 4— Fuel Injectors Section 5— Unit Injectors Section 6— Governors Section 7— Timing Devices Section 8— High Pressure Pipes and Connections NOTE— When the word "fuel" is used in the terms listed it may be omitted providing there can be no misunderstanding.
Standard

Pneumatic Spring Terminology

2016-04-01
CURRENT
J511_201604
This pneumatic spring terminology has been developed to assist engineers and designers in the preparation of specifications and descriptive material relating to pneumatic springs and their components. It does not include gas supply or control systems.
Standard

PNEUMATIC SPRING TERMINOLOGY

1989-06-01
HISTORICAL
J511_198906
This pneumatic spring terminology has been developed to assist engineers and designers in the preparation of specifications and descriptive material relating to pneumatic springs and their components. It does not include gas supply or control systems.
Standard

Sleeve Type Half Bearings

1978-11-01
HISTORICAL
J506B_197811
This SAE Standard defines the normal dimensions, dimensioning practice, tolerances, specialized measurement techniques, and glossary of terms for bearing inserts commonly used in reciprocating machinery. The standard sizes cover a range which permits a designer to employ, in proper proportion, the durability and lubrication requirements of each application, while utilizing the forming and machining practices common in manufacture of sleeve type half bearings. Not included are considerations of hydrodynamic lubrication analysis or mechanical stress factors of associated machine structural parts which determine the nominal sizes to be used, selection of bearing material as related to load carrying capacity, and economics of manufacture. For information concerning materials, see SAE J459 and SAE J460. These suggested sizes provide guidelines which may result in minimal costs of tooling but do not necessarily represent items which can be ordered from stock.
Standard

Sleeve Type Half Bearings

2011-06-10
CURRENT
J506_201106
This SAE Standard defines the normal dimensions, dimensioning practice, tolerances, specialized measurement techniques, and glossary of terms for bearing inserts commonly used in reciprocating machinery. The standard sizes cover a range which permits a designer to employ, in proper proportion, the durability and lubrication requirements of each application, while utilizing the forming and machining practices common in manufacture of sleeve type half bearings. Not included are considerations of hydrodynamic lubrication analysis or mechanical stress factors of associated machine structural parts which determine the nominal sizes to be used, selection of bearing material as related to load carrying capacity, and economics of manufacture. For information concerning materials, see SAE J459 and SAE J460. These suggested sizes provide guidelines which may result in minimal costs of tooling but do not necessarily represent items which can be ordered from stock.
Standard

SINTERED CARBIDE TOOLS

1977-02-01
HISTORICAL
J439_197702
This recommended practice covers methods for measuring or evaluating five properties or characteristics of sintered carbide which contribute significantly to the performance of sintered carbide tools. These properties are: hardness, specific gravity, apparent porosity, structure, and grain size. They are covered under separate headings below.
Standard

Sintered Carbide Tools

2018-01-09
CURRENT
J439_201801
This recommended practice covers methods for measuring or evaluating five properties or characteristics of sintered carbide which contribute significantly to the performance of sintered carbide tools. These properties are: hardness, specific gravity, apparent porosity, structure, and grain size. They are covered under separate headings below.
X