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Standard

Landing Gear Component Heat Damage

2018-07-02
CURRENT
AIR5913A
The purpose of this report is to outline types of in-service heat damage that have been observed in high strength steel landing gear components, with an emphasis on a particular type that is referred to as “Ladder Cracking” which can develop in landing gear shock struts. The report discusses how ladder cracking can be detected visually and evaluated by non-destructive inspection methods, and how it can be repaired at overhaul with the prior approval of the Original Equipment Manufacturer. This report also describes the use of a bearing material that has resolved this problem without introducing other problems. Examples of other types of service induced heat damage are also discussed.
Standard

Crack Initiation and Growth Considerations for Landing Gear Steel With Emphasis on Aermet 100

2004-12-27
CURRENT
AIR5052A
Steel alloys, such as AF1410 (AMS 6527, UNS K92571) and AerMet 100 (AMS 6532), have been developed which have improved Fracture Toughness characteristics compared to the current landing gear steel alloy, 300M (AMS 6419 and AMS 6257, MIL-S-8844, UNS K44220). The 300M steel is the most widely used material in current landing gear designs. It has been successfully used in thousands of applications. The use of the 300M material necessitates a safe life design criterion where components are retired after on-fourth to one-sixth the laboratory test life. This criterion was established in part due to the relative low fracture toughness of low-alloy steel in the 260 to 300 ksi strength range. The high fracture tough alloys give comparable strength levels with an increase in fracture toughness and better resistance to stress corrosion cracking. These alloys may make possible the consideration of new procedures for operation, maintenance, and inspection.
Standard

CRACK INITIATION AND GROWTH CONSIDERATIONS FOR LANDING GEAR STEEL WITH EMPHASIS ON AERMET 100

1997-06-01
HISTORICAL
AIR5052
Steel alloys, such as AF1410 (AMS 6527, UNS K92571) and AerMet 100 (AMS 6532), have been developed which have improved Fracture Toughness characteristics compared to the current landing gear steel alloy, 300M (AMS 6419 and AMS 6257, MIL-S-8844, UNS K44220). The 300M steel is the most widely used material in current landing gear designs. It has been successfully used in thousands of applications. The use of the 300M material necessitates a safe life design criterion where components are retired after one-fourth to one-sixth the laboratory test life. This criterion was established in part due to the relatively low fracture toughness of low-alloy steel in the 260 to 300 ksi strength range. The high fracture tough alloys give comparable strength levels with an increase in fracture toughness and better resistance to stress corrosion cracking. These alloys may make possible the consideration of new procedures for operation, maintenance, and inspection.
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