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Technical Paper

Acid Deposition in California

1982-02-01
821246
Precipitation chemistry measurements have been made at many California locations, with recorded extreme pH values as low as 2.89 from Pasadena and 3.5 from geologically sensitive Sequoia National Park. However, in northern areas of the state experiencing good air quality, very little acid deposition occurs. California's acid precipitation is apparently locally produced, since there are no major pollution source regions upwind of the state. This is attributable to the extremely rapid rates observed for conversion of NOx to nitric acid and SO2 to sulfuric acid in the atmosphere. Recent monitoring data illustrate extreme variations in precipitation chemistry from adjacent sites and even at the same location from one year to the next. Enrichment factor calculations show that in contrast with data from other locations in the world, nitric acid dominates over sulfuric acid in California's rainfall in many locations.
Technical Paper

Investigation of On-Road Crosswinds on Interstate Tractor-Trailer Aerodynamic Efficiency

2014-04-01
2014-01-0608
Heavy duty tractor-trailers under freeway operations consume about 65% of the total engine shaft energy to overcome aerodynamic drag force. Vehicles are exposed to on-road crosswinds which cause change in pressure distribution with a relative wind speed and yaw angle. The objective of this study was to analyze the drag losses as a function of on-road wind conditions, on-road vehicle position and trajectory. Using coefficient of drag (CD) data available from a study conducted at NASA Ames, Geographical Information Systems model, time-varying weather data and road data, a generic model was built to identify the yaw angles and the relative magnitude of wind speed on a given route over a given time period. A region-based analysis was conducted for a study on interstate trucking operation by employing I-79 running through West Virginia as a case study by initiating a run starting at 12am, 03/03/2012 out to 12am, 03/05/2012.
Technical Paper

Central Carolina Vehicle Particulate Emissions Study

2003-03-03
2003-01-0299
In-use, light-duty vehicles were recruited in Cary, North Carolina for emissions testing on a transportable dynamometer in 1999. Two hundred forty-eight vehicles were tested in as received condition using the IM240 driving cycle. The study was conducted in two phases, a summer and winter phase, with half of the vehicles recruited during each phase. Regulated emissions, PM10, carbonaceous PM, aldehydes and ketones were measured for every test. PM2.5, individual volatile hydrocarbons, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, sterane and hopane emissions were measured from a subset of the vehicles. Average light-duty gasoline PM10 emission rates increased from 6.5 mg/mi for 1993-97 vehicles to 53.8 mg/mi for the pre-1985 vehicles. The recruited fleet average, hot-stabilized IM240 PM10 emission rate for gasoline vehicles was 19.0 mg/mi.
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