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Technical Paper

Using Simulation and Optimization Tools to Decide Engine Design Concepts

2000-03-06
2000-01-1267
To meet the future demands on internal combustion engines regarding efficiency emissions and durability all design parameters must be optimized together. As a result of progress in material engineering fuel injection technology turbo charging technology exhaust gas after treatment there arise a multiplicity of possible parameters, such as: design parameters (compression ratio, dimensioning depending on peak firing pressure and mean effective pressure), injection system (rate shaping, split injection, injection pressure, hole diameter), air management (turbo charging with or without VTG, EGR rate) combustion optimization (timing, air access ratio). The interaction of all these parameters can not be over-looked without simulation and optimization tools. This is valid for the concept layout, the optimization and the application process later on.
Technical Paper

A New 3D Model For Vaporizing Diesel Sprays Based on Mixing-Limited Vaporization

2000-03-06
2000-01-0949
Results from numerical computations performed to represent the transient behavior of vaporizing sprays injected into a constant volume chamber and into a High Speed Direct Injection combustion chamber are presented. In order to describe the liquid phase, a new model has been developed from ideas brought forward by recent experimental results (Siebers, 1999) and numerical considerations (Abraham, 1999). The liquid penetration length is given by a 1D model which has been validated on a large number of experiments. In the 3D calculation, break-up, vaporization, drag, collision and coalescence are not modeled. The mass, momentum and energy transfers from the liquid to the gas phase are imposed from the nozzle exit surface to the liquid penetration length. This model enables us to reach time step and grid-independent results. The gas penetrations obtained with the model are checked against experimental results in a constant volume chamber (Verhoeven et al., 1998).
Technical Paper

Production Feasible DME Technology for Direct Injection CI Engines

2001-05-07
2001-01-2015
DiMethyl Ether (DME) has been shown to be a very attractive fuel for low emission direct injection compression ignition (DICI) engines. It combines the advantages of the high efficiencies of diesel cycle engines with soot free combustion. However, its greatest drawback is the need to develop new fuel injection and handling systems. Previous approaches have been common rail type injection systems which have shown great potential in reducing harmful exhaust emissions and achieving good engine performance and efficiency due to good control of both the fuel injection characteristics and temperature. The concept also has proven benefits with respect to convenient and safe fuel handling. The logical evolution of this concept simplifies the fuel system and avoids special components for DME handling such as high pressure rail pumps while retaining all the benefits of the common rail principle.
Technical Paper

Modeling of Engine Warm-Up with Integration of Vehicle and Engine Cycle Simulation

2001-05-14
2001-01-1697
The incorporation of a detailed engine process calculation that takes into account thermal behavior of the engine and exhaust system is essential for a realistic simulation of transient vehicle operation. This is the only possible way to have a precise preliminary calculation of fuel consumption and emissions. Therefore, a comprehensive thermal network of the engine based on the lumped capacity method has been developed. The model allows the computation of component temperatures in steady state operation as well as in transient engine studies, e.g. investigations of engine warm-up. The model is integrated in a co-simulation environment consisting of a detailed vehicle and engine cycle simulation code. The paper describes the procedure of the co-simulation and presents several examples of warm-up simulations.
Technical Paper

The Performance of a Heavy Duty Diesel Engine with a Production Feasible DME Injection System

2001-09-24
2001-01-3629
Over the last few years there has been much interest in DiMethyl Ether (DME) as an alternative fuel for diesel cycle engines. It combines the advantages of a high cetane number with soot free combustion, which makes it eminently suitable for compression ignition engines. However, due to the fact that it is a gas under ambient conditions, it requires special fuel handling and a specially designed fuel injection system, which until recently, was not available. The use of the digital hydraulic operating system (DHOS), combined with a fuel handling system designed to cope with the properties of DME, enables the fuel to be safely and conveniently handled, In addition, the flexibility of the injection system enables injection pressures to be chosen according to the needs of the combustion.
Technical Paper

Research Results and Progress in LeaNOx II -A Co-operation for Lean NOx Abatement

2000-10-16
2000-01-2909
In a consortium of European industrial partners and research institutes, a combination of industrial development and scientific research was organised. The objective was to improve the catalytic NOx conversion for lean burn cars and heavy-duty trucks, taking into account boundary conditions for the fuel consumption. The project lasted for three years. During this period parallel research was conducted in research areas ranging from basic research based on a theoretical approach to full scale emission system development. NOx storage catalysts became a central part of the project. Catalysts were evaluated with respect to resistance towards sulphur poisoning. It was concluded that very low sulphur fuel is a necessity for efficient use of NOx trap technology. Additionally, attempts were made to develop methods for reactivating poisoned catalysts. Methods for short distance mixing were developed for the addition of reducing agent.
Technical Paper

Simulation Aided Process for Developing Powertrains

2000-12-01
2000-01-3161
For the development of complex control algorithms and strategies the engine and powertrain test bed offers a number of advantages over the development in the prototype vehicle. The paper discusses how state-of-the-art simulation techniques can contribute to a continuous development process, which is based upon offline simulation using hardware in the loop, the utilization of modern test bed technology up to vehicle adjustment. The integration of hardware-in-the-loop testing together with vehicle and transmission simulation on the testbed allows to speed up the optimization of fuel consumption, emissions and driveability in an early stage in the development process. The available software tools are presented and application examples are given.
Technical Paper

Turbocharging the DI Gasoline Engine

2000-03-06
2000-01-0251
Regarding concepts for naturally aspirated engines, the high potential for fuel economy of Gasoline Direct Injection can only partially be utilized within the constraints of current or future emission legislation like EURO III / IV or LEV/ULEV. Instead of an expected improvement of 20 - 25 % currently only 10 - 15% can be obtained by the engine alone without vehicle optimizations considering all limitations of high volume production. A detailed analysis reveals concrete measures for further improvement. The application of DI gasoline technology clearly favors the combination with other fuel efficient technologies like downsizing by turbocharging and the application of a variable effective compression ratio by intake valve timing variation. Using the flexibility of direct gasoline injection some deficiencies of these technologies can be eliminated.
Technical Paper

Vehicle Driveability Assessment using Neural Networks for Development, Calibration and Quality Tests

2000-03-06
2000-01-0702
Actual automotive themes in the beginning century are globalization and platform concepts. Platforms reduce manpower for basic power train development and enable a higher vehicle quality by sharing development cost to many models. New drive train generations with direct injected diesel and gasoline engines, variable valve train systems and hybrid drives require complex electronic control systems with many control parameters, which must be calibrated for each platform model to fulfill the targets for emissions, diagnostics and driveability. Calibration becomes a critical procedure in vehicle development. A negative effect of the platform is the reduced possibility to give a model or an OEM a brand specific driveability character, traditionally an important sales - promoting factor. The paper describes a tool for the objective real time assessment of vehicle driveability and vehicle character, using a new subjective - objective approach.
Technical Paper

An integrated 1D/3D workflow for analysis and optimization of injection parameters of a diesel engine

2001-09-23
2001-24-0004
The present contribution gives an overview of the use of different simulation tools for the optimization of injection parameters of a diesel engine. With a one-dimensional tool, the behavior of the mechanics and fluid dynamics of the entire injection system is calculated. This simulation provides information on the dynamic needle lift, injection rates, pressures, etc. The flow within the injector is simulated using a three-dimensional CFD tool. By use of a two-phase model, it is possible to analyze the cavitating flow inside the injector and to calculate the effective nozzle hole area as well as the exit flow characteristics. Mixture formation, combustion and pollutant formation simulation is performed adopting three-dimensional CFD. In order to provide the initial and boundary conditions for the engine CFD simulation and to optimize the engine cycle performance a one-dimensional tool is adopted.
Technical Paper

Improvement of LEV/ULEV Potential of Fuel Efficient High Performance Engines

1992-02-01
920416
The combined requirement of achieving CAFE values between 32 to 38 mpg plus LEV/ULEV emission standards to comply with US legal requirements between 1995 and 2000 represents the most demanding challenge for engine engineering. Thus all possible methods of engine improvement towards fuel economy and emissions have to be considered. Besides using new ideas also the methods of engine development have to be modernized to cope with the challenge. The paper presents advanced combustion and exhaust gas aftertreatment systems which combine high power output, favourable torque characteristics and high fuel economy with the potential for obtaining LEV/ULEV emission values, as well as improved development techniques.
Technical Paper

Flame Visualisation in Standard SI-Engines - Results of a Tomographic Combustion Analysis

1997-02-24
970870
An optical sensor system provides access to standard SI engine combustion chambers via the cylinder head gasket. Flame radiation within the plane of the gasket is observed with optical fibers which are arranged to allow the tomographic reconstruction of flame distribution. The effect of convective in-cylinder air motion generated by variations of inlet ports and combustion chamber geometries on flame propagation is directly visible. A high degree of correlation between flame intensity distribution and NOx emission levels yields a useful assessment of combustion chamber configurations with minimum emission levels. The location of knock centers is identified.
Technical Paper

An Integrated Numerical Tool for Engine Noise and Vibration Simulation

1997-05-20
971992
The development of low noise engines and vehicles, accompanied by the reduction of costs and development time, can be obtained only if the design engineer is supported by complex calculation tools in a concurrent engineering process. In this respect, the reduction of vibrations (passenger comfort) and of vehicle noise (accelerated pass by noise) are important targets to meet legislative limits. AVL has been developing simulation programs for the dynamic-acoustic optimization of engines and gear trains for many years. To simulate the structure-born and air-born noise behavior of engines under operating conditions, substantial efforts on the mathematical simulation model are necessary. The simulation tool EXCITE, described in this paper, allows the calculation of the dynamic-acoustic behavior of power units.
Technical Paper

Engineering Vehicle Sound Quality

1997-05-20
972063
The characteristically good fuel economy of the high speed direct injection diesel engine has led to increased market share as the power unit of passenger cars. This trend is particularly true in Europe and, if not halted prematurely by emissions legislation, is likely to continue. However, another characteristic of the high speed DI engine is increased noise and vibration over its gasoline counterpart. This has meant that additional noise and vibration measures are required in order to approach the competitive refinement levels of gasoline engine installations. This paper considers some of the characteristic diesel engine noise and vibration problems associated with vehicle installation and passenger comfort. The paper also discusses subjective and objective assessment and considers approaches to engineering more desirable sound quality.
Technical Paper

The Interaction Between Diesel Fuel Density and Electronic Engine Management Systems

1996-10-01
961975
The influence of fuel density on exhaust emissions from diesel engines has been investigated in a number of studies and these have generally concluded that particulate emissions rise with increasing density This paper reviews recent work in this area, including the European Programme on Emissions, Fuels and Engine Technologies (EPEFE) and reports on a complementary study conducted by CONCAWE, in cooperation with AVL List GmbH The project was carried out with a passenger car equipped with an advanced technology high speed direct injection turbocharged / intercooled diesel engine fitted with a complex engine management system which was referenced to a specific fuel density This production model featured electronic diesel control, closed loop exhaust gas recirculation and an exhaust oxidation catalyst Tests were carried out with two EPEFE fuels which excluded the influence of key fuel properties other than density (828 8 and 855 1 kg/m3) Engine operation was adjusted for changes in fuel density by resetting the electronic programmable, read-only memory to obtain the same energy output from the two test fuels In chassis dynamometer tests over the ECE15 + EUDC test cycle the major impact of fuel density on particulate emissions for advanced engine technology/engine management systems was established A large proportion of the density effect on particulate and NOx emissions was due to physical interaction between fuel density and the electronic engine management system Limited bench engine testing of the basic engine showed that nearly complete compensation of the density effect on smoke (particulate) emissions could be achieved when no advanced technology was applied
Technical Paper

Fuel Injection Technology for Low Emissions HSDI Diesel Engines

1996-10-01
962369
The worldwide trend to increasingly stringent exhaust emissions standards, together with consumer requirements, are forcing both vehicle and engine manufacturers, as well as manufacturers of ancilliary equipment, to introduce new and often novel technology in order to produce clean, quiet and socially acceptable transport at affordable prices. The combustion process lies at the heart of the engine and the quality of the combustion determines the acceptability of the product to a very large extent. The fuel injection system plays a large role in the combustion process and in consequence, the fuel system type and capabilities strongly influence the performance of the combustion system. There has never been such a range of fuel injection systems available at one time as there is today. High pressure hydraulically actuated systems /1/ compete with cam driven fuel injection systems /2/ to deliver the injection requirements demanded by the vehicles both of today and in the future.
Technical Paper

ULEV Potential of a DI/TCI Diesel Passenger Car Engine Operated on Dimethyl Ether

1995-12-01
952754
The paper describes a feasibility test program on a 2 liter, 4 cylinder DI/TCI passenger car engine operated on the new alternative fuel Dimethyl Ether (DME, CH3 - O - CH3) with the aim of demonstrating its potential of meeting ULEV emissions (0.2 g/mi NOx in the FTP 75 test cycle) when installed in a full size passenger car. Special attention is drawn to the fuel injection equipment (FIE) as well as combustion system requirements towards the reduction of NOx and combustion noise while keeping energetic fuel consumption at the level of the baseline DI/TCI diesel engine. FIE and combustion system parameters were optimized on the steady state dynamometer by variation of a number of parameters, such as rate of injection, number of nozzle holes, compression ratio, piston bowl shape and exhaust gas recirculation.
Technical Paper

Analytical Wall-Function Strategy for the Modelling of Turbulent Heat Transfer in the Automotive CFD Applications

2019-04-02
2019-01-0206
In contrast to the well-established “standard” log-law wall function, the analytical wall function (AWF) as an advanced modelling approach has not been extensively used in the industrial computational fluid dynamics (CFD) applications. As the model was originally developed aiming at computations on relatively coarse meshes, potential stability issues may arise due to the pressure-gradient sensitivity if employing locally inappropriate mesh layers, typically associated with the complex geometry details. This work evaluates performance of the thermal AWF, as proposed by Suga [4], in conjunction with the main flow field computed employing the k-ζ-f turbulence model and the hybrid wall treatment (denoted as AWF-e) within the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) framework.
Technical Paper

Potential for Emission Reduction and Fuel Economy with Micro & Mild HEV

2019-11-21
2019-28-2504
The development of modern combustion engines (spark ignition as well as compression ignition) for vehicles compliant with future oriented emission legislation (BS6, Euro VI, China 6) has introduced several technologies for improvement of both fuel efficiency as well as low emissions combustion strategies. Some of these technologies as there are high pressure multiple injection systems or sophisticated exhaust gas after treatment system imply substantial increase in test and calibration time as well as equipment cost. With the introduction of 48V systems for hybridization a cost- efficient enhancement and, partially, an even attractive alternative is now available. An overview will be given on current technologies as well as on implemented test procedures. The focus will be on solutions which have potential for the Indian market, i.e. solutions which can be implemented with moderate application effort for currently available compact and medium size cars.
Technical Paper

About Describing the Knocking Combustion in Gasoline and Gas Engines by CFD Methods

2015-09-01
2015-01-1911
Spark ignited engines are today operated more and more often under high load conditions, where one reason can be identified in the necessity of increasing the efficiency and hence reducing fuel consumption and specific CO2 emissions. Since the gasoline engine operation is inherently limited by knocking at high loads, strategies must be identified, which allow reliable identification and simulation of the appearance of this undesirable type of combustion. A new numerical model for the description of those kinds of pre-flame reactions in a CFD framework is discussed in this paper. Despite emphasis is put here on the auto-ignition effects, it will also be explained that the model is capable of supporting the engine development process in all combustion and emission related aspects.
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