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Technical Paper

Early Noise Analysis for Robust Quiet Brake Design

2009-04-20
2009-01-0858
At the early design stage it is easier to achieve impacts on the brake noise. However most noise analyses are applied later in the development stage when the design space is limited and changes are costly. Early noise analysis is seldom applied due to lack of credible inputs for the finite element modeling, the sensitive nature of the noise, and reservations on the noise event screening of the analysis. A high quality brake finite element model of good components’ and system representation is the necessary basis for credible early noise analysis. That usually requires the inputs from existing production hardware. On the other hand in vehicle braking the frequency contents and propensity of many noise cases are sensitive to minor component design modifications, environmental factors and hardware variations in mass production. Screening the noisy modes and their sensitivity levels helps confirm the major noisy event at the early design stage.
Technical Paper

Aeroacoustics of an Automobile A-Pillar Rain Gutter: Computational and Experimental Study

1999-03-01
1999-01-1128
Noise due to the flow over an automobile A-pillar rain gutter in isolation was computed using a two step procedure. Initially the flow solution was obtained by solving the Reynolds Averaged Navier Stokes (RANS) equations. Acoustical Sources were extracted from the flow solution and propagated to the far-field using the Lighthill-Curle equation. Experiments were conducted to evaluate the computations. Compared results include steady pressures, time dependent pressures, and sound intensity levels. Computed results and experimental data were reduced in a similar way to ensure a one to one comparison. Computed results are in good agreement with the experimental values. A-weighted noise levels are predicted reasonably well.
Technical Paper

Case Study - Experimental Determination of Airborne and Structure-borne Road Noise Spectral Content on Passenger Vehicles

2005-05-16
2005-01-2522
Appropriate road noise levels are critical to perceived quality in today's highly competitive automotive industry. Tire noise is often one of the dominant sources. In order to provide effective noise control schemes it is imperative to fully define the noise paths. In this paper, a case study of an experimental lab method is presented that allows definitive understanding of the structure-borne and airborne spectral contributions of tire noise. For this study, interior noise data were collected using a 10 ft road wheel. Data were collected for the front and rear tires. These measurements contained both the structure-borne and airborne contributions. The same test was performed with the tire physically disconnected from the vehicle structure. This measurement contained only the airborne contribution. The structure-borne contribution was then calculated as the difference in noise levels between the two cases.
Technical Paper

SEA Modeling of A Vehicle Door System

2005-05-16
2005-01-2427
The Door system is one of the major paths for vehicle interior noise under a variety of load conditions. In this paper we consider the elements of the door lower (excluding glass) in terms of noise transmission. Passenger car doors are comprised of the outer skin, door cavity, door inner sheet metal, vapor barrier, and interior trim. Statistical Energy Analysis (SEA) models must effectively describe these components in terms of their acoustic properties and capture the dominant behaviors relative to the overall door system. In addition, the models must interface seamlessly with existing vehicle level SEA models. SEA modeling techniques for the door components are discussed with door STL testing and model correlation results.
Technical Paper

Power-Based Noise Reduction Concept and Measurement Techniques

2005-05-16
2005-01-2401
This paper presents a Power-Based Noise Reduction (PBNR) concept and uses PBNR to set vehicle acoustic specifications for sound package design. This paper starts with the PBNR definition and describes the correct measurement techniques. This paper also derives the asymptotic relationships among PBNR, conventional noise reduction (NR), and sound transmission loss, for a simple case consisting of the source, path, and receiver subsystems. The advantages of using PBNR over conventional Noise Reduction (NR) are finally demonstrated in vehicle measurement examples.
Technical Paper

Evaluation of the Revised ISO362 Standard for Vehicle Exterior Noise Measurement

2005-05-16
2005-01-2417
The International Organization for Standardization (ISO) has developed a new measurement procedure, ISO362:200X, for vehicle exterior noise. This proposed standard covers motorcycles, light duty vehicles, and heavy-duty vehicles. The intent of the new procedure is to measure vehicle noise consistent with typical urban operation. SAE has conducted a cooperative research program to evaluate the new ISO procedure for light duty vehicles with regard to the intent of the procedure, technical, and practical considerations. The results of the cooperative research program indicate the new ISO procedure meets the intent of measuring typical traffic noise and does so in a technically correct and practically achievable manner.
Technical Paper

Robust Design of Glass Run-Channel Seal

2004-03-08
2004-01-1687
Glass run-channel seals are located between DIW (Door in White) and window glass. They are designed to allow window glass to move smoothly while other two major requirements are met; (1) Provide insulation to water leakage and noise, and (2) Stabilize the window glass during glass movement, door slamming and vehicle operation. For a robust glass guidance system, it is critical to minimize the variation of seal compression force. In addition, it is desired to maintain a low seal compression force, which meets the minimum requirement for insulating water leakage/noise and stabilizing the window glass, for enhancing the durability of glass guidance system. In this paper, a robust synthesis and design concepts on the glass run-channel seal is presented. The developed concept is demonstrated with test data.
Technical Paper

High Performance Vehicle Chassis Structure for NVH Reduction

2006-04-03
2006-01-0708
The main objective of this paper was to determine if the vehicle performance can be maintained with a reduced mass cradle structure. Aluminum and magnesium cradles were compared with the baseline steel cradle. First, the steel chassis alone is analyzed with the refined finite element model and validated with experimental test data for the frequencies, normal modes, stiffnesses and the drive-point mobilities at various attachment mount/bushing locations. The superelement method in conjunction with the component mode synthesis (CMS) technique was used for each component of the vehicle such as Body-In-White, Instrument Panel, Steering Column Housing & Wheel, Seats, Cradles, CRFM, etc. After assemblage of all the superelements, analysis was carried out by changing the front and rear cradle gauges and the material properties. The drive-point mobility response was computed at various locations and the noise (sound pressure) level was calculated at the driver and passenger ears.
Technical Paper

Acoustical Advantages of a New Polypropylene Absorbing Material

1999-05-17
1999-01-1669
Sound absorption is one way to control noise in automotive passenger compartments. Fibrous or porous materials absorb sound in a cavity by dissipating energy associated with a propagating sound wave. The objective of this study was to evaluate the acoustic performance of a cotton fiber absorbing material in comparison to a new polypropylene fibrous material, called ECOSORB ®. The acoustical evaluation was done using measurements of material properties along with sound pressure level from road testing of a fully-assembled vehicle. The new polypropylene fibrous material showed significant advantages over the cotton fiber materials in material properties testing and also in-vehicle measurements. In addition to the performance benefits, the polypropylene absorber provided weight savings over the cotton fiber material.
Technical Paper

Minimization of Error for Enforced Motion in FEM

2001-04-30
2001-01-1409
Several methods are currently used to enforce motion in different types of noise and vibration models. Experimentally based FRF models often use a matrix inversion technique to enforce motion. In finite element models, the large mass method is one that is very commonly used. A literature review has shown few guidelines for determining the size of these large masses. In this paper, the relationship between the matrix inversion technique and the large mass method is derived. From this relationship, conditions necessary for these large mass FEM models to converge to the same answers as the matrix inversion technique are derived. These conditions are then used to develop a criterion for determining a smallest possible large mass. Results from a simple model are presented to demonstrate the criterion.
Technical Paper

Application of Elastomeric Components for Noise and Vibration Isolation in the Automotive Industry

2001-04-30
2001-01-1447
Elastomeric isolators are used in a variety of different applications to reduce noise and vibration. To use isolators effectively requires the product design and development engineer to satisfy multiple objectives, which typically include packaging restrictions, environmental criteria, limitations on motion control, load requirements, and minimum fatigue life, in addition to vibration isolation performance. An understanding of elastomeric material properties and the methods used to characterize elastomeric component behavior is necessary to achieve desired performance. Typical design criteria and functional objectives for various isolator applications, including powertrain mounts, suspension control arm bushings, shock absorber bushings, exhaust hangers, flexible couplings, cradle mounts, body mounts and vibration dampers are also discussed.
Technical Paper

The Importance of Sealing Pass-Through Locations Via the Front of Dash Barrier Assembly

1999-05-17
1999-01-1802
An improvement in a vehicle's front of dash barrier assembly's acoustical performance has in the past been addressed by both adding individual absorbers and increasing the overall weight of the dash sound barrier assembly. Depending upon the target market of the vehicle, adding mass may not be an option for improved acoustical performance. Understanding the value of an increase in vehicle mass and / or cost for a specific level of improved acoustical performance continues to plague both Original Equipment Manufacturer (OEM) Engineers and Purchasing representatives. This paper examines the importance of properly sealing the front of dash pass-through areas and offers recommendations which can improve the overall vehicle acoustical performance without the addition of cost and mass to the vehicle.
Technical Paper

Development and Experimental Evaluation of a Vehicle Structural-Acoustic Trimmed-Body Model

1999-05-17
1999-01-1798
A structural-acoustic finite-element model of an automobile trimmed-body is developed and experimentally evaluated for predicting body vibration and interior noise for frequencies up to 200 Hz. The structural-acoustic model is developed by coupling finite element models of trimmed-body structure and the passenger-compartment acoustic cavity. Frequency-response-function measurements of the structural vibration and interior acoustic response for shaker excitation of a trimmed body are used to assess the accuracy of the structural-acoustic model.
Technical Paper

Brake Squeal Noise Testing and Analysis Correlation

2003-05-05
2003-01-1616
Brake squeal has been a persistent quality issue for automobile OEMs and brake system suppliers. The ability to model and measure brake squeal dynamics is of utmost importance in brake squeal reduction efforts. However, due to the complex nature of brake squeal and the wide frequency range in which it occurs, it is difficult to accurately correlate and update analytical models to experimental results. This paper introduces a systematic and rigorous correlation and updating process that yields FE models, which can accurately reproduce high-frequency brake squeal dynamics.
Technical Paper

Pitch Intervals: Linking Sound Quality Engineering and Musical Acoustics

2003-05-05
2003-01-1503
One task of sound quality engineering is to find of links between engineering measures and human perceptions of sound. Over the years, several papers have been presented at SAE N&V conferences concerning the sound quality of electrical motor sounds in automotive applications. Many papers have focused on the variation in motor speed during system operation. While some papers have suggested that a useful measure for slow variations is fluctuation strength, other papers suggest measures for dealing with non-periodic variations or the general trend in motor speed. Both sets of papers tend to describe the changes in terms of percentage of a statistic of the motor speed. While percentage is a useful engineering approach, it may not be the best way to relate how the changes will be perceived by a human listener. The alternate approach described here offers formulae, in units of scale-steps or cents, to describe the changes based on the link between engineering measures and music.
Technical Paper

Vibration Modeling and Correlation of Driveline Boom for TFWD/AWD Crossover Vehicles

2003-05-05
2003-01-1495
Reducing the high cost of hardware testing with analytical methods has been highly accelerated in the automotive industry. This paper discusses an analytical model to simulate the driveline boom test for the transverse engine with all wheel drive configuration on a front-wheel drive base (TFWD/AWD). Driveline boom caused by engine firing frequency that excites the bending mode of the propeller shaft becomes a noise and vibration issue for the design of TFWD/AWD driveline. The major source of vibrations and noise under the investigation in this paper is the dominant 3rd order engine torque pulse disturbance that excites the bending of the propeller shaft, the bending of the powertrain and possible the bending of the rear halfshaft. All other excitation sources in this powertrain for a 60° V6 engine with a pushrod type valvetrain are assessed and NVH issues are also considered in this transient dynamic model.
Technical Paper

Vibration Characteristics of Cardboard Inserts in Shells

2003-05-05
2003-01-1489
A study has been conducted to determine the noise and vibration effect of inserting a cardboard liner into a thin, circular cross-sectioned, cylindrical shell. The relevance of such a study is to improve the understanding of the effects when a cardboard liner is used in a propeller shaft for noise and vibration control purposes. It is found from the study that the liner adds significant modal stiffness, while an increase in modal mass is also observed for a particular shell type of mode. Further, the study has shown that the additional modal damping provided by the liner is not appropriately modeled by Coulomb friction damping, a damping model often intuitively associated with cardboard materials. Rather, the damping is best modeled as proportional viscous damping.
Technical Paper

SEA in Vehicle Development Part II: Consistent SEA Modeling for Vehicle Noise Analysis

2003-05-05
2003-01-1547
In this paper, a model condensation technique is developed to ensure consistent modeling of STL (Sound Transmission Loss) between coarse and detailed SEA model. In the Performance-Based coarse SEA Model, the component level performance (STL and absorption) is assigned to each path, which comes from various ways including detailed analytical SEA model. From the detailed SEA model for the component or even the whole vehicle, the equivalent performance data needs to be condensed and extracted for the coarse model. The condensation theory for equivalent STL is presented in this paper. The extra work needed to apply this technique to detailed SEA model is negligible by using AutoSEA script. An example for condensation of a detailed component model is given at the end. Comparison between the detailed analytical SEA model and the coarse SEA Model is consistent.
Technical Paper

Vehicle Panel Vibro-Acoustic Behavior and Damping

2003-05-05
2003-01-1406
Damping treatments are widely used in passenger vehicles, but the knowledge of damping treatments is often fragmentary in the industry. In this study, vibro-acoustics behavior of a set of vehicle floor and dash panels with various types of damping treatments was investigated. Sound transmission loss, sound radiation efficiency as well as damping loss factor were measured. The damping treatments ranged from laminated steel construction (thin viscoelastic layer) and doubler plate construction (thick viscoelastic layer) to less structural “bake-on” damping and self-adhesive aluminum foil-backed damping treatments. In addition, the bare vehicle panels were tested as a baseline and the fully carpeted floor panel was tested as a reference. The test data were then examined together with analytical modeling of some of the test configurations. As expected, the study found that damping treatments add more than damping. They also add mass and change body panel stiffness.
Technical Paper

A Case Study on Airborne Road Noise Reduction of a Passenger Vehicle

2003-05-05
2003-01-1407
This paper presents a case study on reducing road noise of a passenger vehicle. SEA, insertion loss and sound intensity measurements were the tools used in the study. A SEA model was constructed to predict the primary paths (panels or area) contributing to the overall interior sound field. Insertion loss measurements were used to verify the primary contributing paths identified using SEA. To provide further details of the primary paths, intensity maps of identified panels were measured allowing detailed reconstruction of the contributory panels. The SEA model, insertion loss, and intensity maps aided in providing possible design fixes that will effectively reduce road noise. Finally, comparisons of predicted results versus actual results at both a subsystem and a full vehicle level are included in this paper.
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