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Technical Paper

Non-Linear Dynamic Analysis of a SuperPlug™ Door Module Response to a Door Slam Event

1999-03-01
1999-01-0406
The SuperPlug™ door module is a new Delphi innovation. It is a one-piece composite structure, which integrates several door components into one assembly. This reduces the total part count, simplifies the vehicle level assembly process, and reduces labor cost (see the Appendix). The door slam durability test is an important factor in door module design. As more hardware is integrated into the SuperPlug, this subsystem performance in a door slam test becomes important. Therefore, the correct placement of components and the supporting structure is critical. Currently, the evaluation of door slam durability for the SuperPlug is a process of build then test. This is time consuming and costly due to a long testing lead-time and the expense of tooling a new mold. It was realized that a numerical process for assessing the effect of door slam would be required. This process would compute the dynamic response using finite element analysis (FEA).
Technical Paper

The Assembly Deformation and Pressure of Stuffed Catalytic Converter Accounting for the Hysteresis Behavior of Pressure vs Density Curve of the Intumescent Mat

2000-03-06
2000-01-0223
Accurately predicting converter assembly deformation and mat pressure is essential in converter packaging design and manufacturing. In stuffing packaging, the annulus between the deformed shell and the catalyst is larger than that between the stuffing cone and the catalyst. As a result, the mat expands and undergoes unloading process. Tests show that the mat exhibits different loading and unloading characteristics. Using such a hysteresis mat pressure vs density curve in finite element analysis, the computed converter deformations closely agree with test data. Conversly, neglecting the mat hysteresis behavior may overestimate the deformation and pressure by a factor of three to four.
Technical Paper

Diagnostic Development for an Electric Power Steering System

2000-03-06
2000-01-0819
Electric power steering (EPS) is an advanced steering system that uses an electric motor to provide steering assist. Being a new technology it lacks the extensive operational history of conventional steering systems. Also conventional systems cannot be used to command an output independent of the driver input. In contrast EPS, by means of an electric motor, could be used to do so. As a result EPS systems may have additional failure modes, which need to be studied. In this paper we will consider the requirements for successful EPS operation. The steps required to develop diagnostics based on the requirements are also discussed. The results of this paper have been implemented in various EPS-based programs.
Technical Paper

FMERA - Failure Modes, Effects, and (Financial) Risk Analysis

2001-03-05
2001-01-0375
Continuous Improvement activities are often based on a list of top concerns, such as highest RPN (Risk Priority Number) on the PFMEA (Process Failure Modes and Effects Analysis), warranty items, or scrap rates. But a company is in business to make a profit for its stockholders. Therefore, money should be considered, rather than just technical engineering tools and RPNs. Current PFMEA methodology (See references 1 and 2) focuses on delivering quality parts to the customer. The financial impact of various potential process problems is not considered directly. A new and extended technique called FMERA (pronounced Fuh-MAIR-uh) can identify and prioritize the process part of potential problems that have the most financial impact on an operation. Alternatives can be evaluated to maximize the financial benefits. FMERA is a method for getting the voice of the stockholder into process decisions.
Technical Paper

Use of Fuzzy Logic in Wheel Slip Assignment - Part II: Yaw Rate Control with Sideslip Angle Limitation

2002-03-04
2002-01-1220
This paper is an extension to the work presented in part I [1]. The control objective is still the same - use a logic based control design technique to assign a wheel slip, λ, to each corner of a vehicle, to track overall desired vehicle dynamics. As in part I, a fuzzy logic based controller is the primary control, with additional logic to select the inside/outside classifiers for the wheels. In part I, only the reduction of yaw rate error, e, was considered. It was shown that, although the overall system had satisfactory performance, there was slight deteriorization in the tracking performance when trying to compensate through a significant vehicle sideslip angle, β. In this paper, additional logic is introduced into the control to limit the vehicle sideslip angle, β; thus, allowing for a more robust desired yaw rate, Ωd, tracking control performance. The emergency lane change maneuver is simulated to show the effectiveness of the redesigned control.
Technical Paper

An Analytical Assessment of Rotor Distortion Attributed to Wheel Assembly

2001-10-28
2001-01-3134
The lateral runout of disc brake corner components can lead to the generation of brake system pulsation. Emphasis on reducing component flatness and lateral runout tolerances are a typical response to address this phenomenon. This paper presents the results of an analytical study that examined the effect that the attachment of the wheel to the brake corner assembly could have on the lateral distortion of the rotor. An analysis procedure was developed to utilize the finite element method and simulate the mechanics of the assembly process. Calculated rotor distortions were compared to laboratory measurements. A statistical approach was utilized, in conjunction with the finite element method, to study a number of wheel and brake corner parameters and identify the characteristics of a robust design.
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