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Technical Paper

Time Resolved Exhaust Port Sampling Studies Related to Hydrocarbon Emissions from SI Engines

1998-10-19
982558
The role of post-combustion oxidation in influencing exhaust hydrocarbon emissions from spark ignition engines has been identified as one of the major uncertainties in hydrocarbon emissions research [l]*. While we know that post-combustion oxidation plays a significant role, the factors that control the oxidation are not well known. In order to address some of these issues a research program has been initiated at Drexel University. In preliminary studies, seven gaseous fuels: methane, ethane,ethene,propane,propene, n-butane, 1-butene and their blends were used to examine the effect of fuel structure on exhaust emissions. The results of the studies presented in an earlier paper [2] showed that the effect of fuel structure is manifested through its effect on the post-combustion environment and the associated oxidation process. A combination of factors like temperatures, fuel diffusion and reaction rates were used to examine and explain the exhaust hydrocarbon emission levels.
Technical Paper

Tracer Fuel Injection Studies on Exhaust Port Hydrocarbon Oxidation

1998-10-19
982559
Time resolved exhaust port sampling results show that the gas mixture in the port at exhaust valve closing contains high concentrations of hydrocarbons. These hydrocarbons are mixed with hot in-cylinder gases during blowdown and can react either via gas phase kinetics in the exhaust port/runner system or subsequently on the exhaust catalyst before they are emitted. Studies were conducted on a single cylinder, four stroke engine in our laboratory to determine the interaction between the hot blowdown gases and the hydrocarbons which remain in the exhaust port. A preselected concentration and volume of hydrocarbon tracers (propane, propene, n-butane, and 1-butene) in either oxygen/nitrogen mixtures or pure nitrogen were injected into the exhaust port just behind the exhaust valve to control the initial conditions for any potential oxidation in the port.
Technical Paper

A Skeletal Chemical Kinetic Model for the HCCI Combustion Process

2002-03-04
2002-01-0423
In Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) engines, fuel oxidation chemistry determines the auto-ignition timing, the heat release, the reaction intermediates, and the ultimate products of combustion. Therefore a model that correctly simulates fuel oxidation at these conditions would be a useful design tool. Detailed models of hydrocarbon fuel oxidation, consisting of hundreds of chemical species and thousands of reactions, when coupled with engine transport process models, require tremendous computational resources. A way to lessen the burden is to use a “skeletal” reaction model, containing only tens of species and reactions. This paper reports an initial effort to extend our skeletal chemical kinetic model of pre-ignition through the entire HCCI combustion process. The model was developed from our existing preignition model, which has 29 reactions and 20 active species, to yield a new model with 69 reactions and 45 active species.
Technical Paper

Prediction of Pre-ignition Reactivity and Ignition Delay for HCCI Using a Reduced Chemical Kinetic Model

2001-03-05
2001-01-1025
Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) engines have the possibility of low NOx and particulate emissions and high fuel efficiencies. In HCCI the oxidation chemistry determines the auto-ignition timing, the heat release rate, the reaction intermediates, and the ultimate products of combustion. This paper reports an initial effort to apply our reduced chemical kinetic model to HCCI processes. The model was developed to study the pre-ignition characteristics (pre-ignition heat release and start of ignition) of primary reference fuels (PRF) and includes 29 reactions and 20 active species. The only modifications to the model were to make the proscribed adjustments to the fuel specific rate constants, and to enhance the H2O2 decomposition rate to agree with published data.
Technical Paper

Predictions of Cyclic Variability in an SI Engine and Comparisons with Experimental Data

1991-10-01
912345
An investigation of cyclic variability in a spark ignition engine is reported. Specifically, the predictions of an engine code have been compared with experimental data obtained using a well-characterized SI engine. The engine used for the experimental work and modeled in the code is the single cylinder research engine developed at Sandia National Laboratories and now operating at Drexel University. The data used for comparison were cylinder pressure histories for 110 engine cycles gathered during operation at a single engine operating condition. The code allows the various factors that could influence cyclic variability to be examined independently. Specifically, a model has been used to independently examine the effects of variations in equivalence ratio and of the turbulence intensity on cycle-to-cycle variations in the peak cylinder pressure, the crankangle of occurrence of peak pressure, the flame development angle, and the rapid burning angle.
Technical Paper

Post Combustion Hydrocarbon Oxidation and Exhaust Emissions - Neat Fuel and Fuel Blend Studies

1998-05-04
981456
Inevitably a fraction of the hydrocarbon fuel in spark ignition engines escapes in-cylinder combustion and flows out with the burned products. Post combustion oxidation in the cylinder and exhaust port may consume a part of this fuel and plays an important role in determining exhaust emission levels. This paper presents results from experiments designed to identify the factors that control post-combustion oxidation. Regulated exhaust components and detailed hydrocarbon species were measured using seven neat hydrocarbons and four blends as fuel. The fuels were selected to compare the relative rates of mixing and chemical kinetics. The results indicate that exhaust temperature, diffusion rates and fuel kinetics each play a complicated role in determining emission levels.
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