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Technical Paper

Door System Design for Improved Closure Sound Quality

1999-05-17
1999-01-1681
Door closing sounds are an important element of the craftsmanship image of a vehicle. This paper examines the relationship between closure sound quality and door system design. The perception of door closing sound quality is shown to be primarily related to it's loudness and sharpness. Of the two, sharpness is more important than loudness. Other factors, like ring-down may also affect closure sound quality. The door system is made up of a number of components. The most important in terms of sound quality are the door and body structure, latch, and door seals. Each of these are classified as either a sound source, a transmission path or a sound radiator. Methods for improving the design of these components for good closure sound quality are discussed in some detail.
Technical Paper

The Effects of Retained Fluid and Humidity on the Evacuation of Critical Vehicle Systems

1999-05-10
1999-01-1630
In automotive assembly facilities worldwide, many critical vehicle systems such as brakes, power steering, radiator, and air conditioning require the appropriate fluid to function. In order to insure that these critical vehicle systems receive the correct amount of properly treated fluid, automotive manufacturers employ a method called Evacuation and Fill. Due to their closed-loop design, many critical vehicle systems must be first exposed to vacuum prior to being flooded with fluid. Only after the evacuation and fill process is complete will the critical vehicle system be able to perform as specified. It has long been thought, but never proven, that humidity and entrenched fluid were major hindrances to the Evacuation and Fill process. Consequently, Ford Motor Company Advanced Manufacturing Technology Development, Sandalwood Enterprises, Kettering University, and Dominion Tool & Die conducted a detailed project on this subject.
Technical Paper

Engine-Out Emissions from a Direct-Injection Spark-Ignition (DISI) Engine

1999-05-03
1999-01-1529
The effects of operating parameters (speed, load, spark-timing, EGR, and end of fuel injection timing [EOI]) on engine-out, regulated (total HC, NOx, and CO) and speciated HC emissions have been investigated for a 1.83 L direct-injection, spark-ignition (DISI) engine. As the EOI is varied over the range from high to low stratification with other engine parameters held constant, the mole fractions of all regulated emissions vary sharply over relatively small (10-20 crank angle degrees [CAD]) changes in EOI, suggesting that emissions are very sensitive to the evaporation, mixing, and motion of the stratified fuel cloud prior to ignition. The contribution of unburned fuel to the HC emissions decreases while the olefinic partial oxidation products increase as the fuel stratification increases, increasing the smog reactivity of the HC in the exhaust gas by 25%.
Technical Paper

Development of a Piston Ring-Cylinder Bore Wear Model

2000-06-19
2000-01-1788
In an internal combustion engine, the wear in the piston ring/cylinder bore contact initially increases rapidly due to run-in and then attains a steady state during which the engine spends most of its useful life. This paper describes the development of an abrasive wear model for both cylinder bore and piston rings for the steady state period. The model took into account shear thinning of the lubricant, but it did not consider the effects of transient operations, geometry changes due to bore distortions, ring twist, ring motion, and corrosion. The model predicted the bore wear depth distribution from the top dead center (TDC) to the bottom dead center (BDC) and ring wear depth under different operating conditions. The maximum bore wear depth was predicted to occur at about 20 degrees after TDC where the combustion gas pressure reached its peak value. The model predicted an increase in bore and ring wear depth with increasing engine speed.
Technical Paper

Experimental and Modeling Evaluations of a Vacuum-Insulated Catalytic Converter

1999-10-25
1999-01-3678
Vehicle evaluations and model calculations were conducted on a vacuum-insulated catalytic converter (VICC). This converter uses vacuum and a eutectic PCM (phase-change material) to prolong the temperature cool-down time and hence, may keep the converter above catalyst light-off between starts. Tailpipe emissions from a 1992 Tier 0 5.2L van were evaluated after 3hr, 12hr, and 24hr soak periods. After a 12hr soak the HC emissions were reduced by about 55% over the baseline HC emissions; after a 24hr soak the device did not exhibit any benefit in light-off compared to a conventional converter. Cool-down characteristics of this VICC indicated that the catalyst mid-bed temperature was about 180°C after 24hrs. Model calculations of the temperature warm-up were conducted on a VICC converter. Different warm-up profiles within the converter were predicted depending on the initial temperature of the device.
Technical Paper

Further Experiments on the Effects of In-Cylinder Wall Wetting on HC Emissions from Direct Injection Gasoline Engines

1999-10-25
1999-01-3661
A recently developed in-cylinder fuel injection probe was used to deposit a small amount of liquid fuel on various surfaces within the combustion chamber of a 4-valve engine that was operating predominately on liquefied petroleum gas (LPG). A fast flame ionization detector (FFID) was used to examine the engine-out emissions of unburned and partially-burned hydrocarbons (HCs). Injector shut-off was used to examine the rate of liquid fuel evaporation. The purpose of these experiments was to provide insights into the HC formation mechanism due to in-cylinder wall wetting. The variables investigated were the effects of engine operating conditions, coolant temperature, in-cylinder wetting location, and the amount of liquid wall wetting. The results of the steady state tests show that in-cylinder wall wetting is an important source of HC emissions both at idle and at a part load, cruise-type condition. The effects of wetting location present the same trend for idle and part load conditions.
Technical Paper

NOx Destruction Behavior of Select Materials When Combined with a Non-Thermal Plasma

1999-10-25
1999-01-3640
NOx reduction efficiency under simulated lean burn conditions is examined for a non-thermal plasma in combination with borosilicate glass, alumina, titania, Cu-ZSM-5 and Na-ZSM-5. The non-thermal plasma alone or with a packed bed of borosilicate glass beads converts NO to NO2 and partially oxidizes hydrocarbons. Alumina and Na-ZSM-5 reduce a maximum of 40% and 50% of NOx respectively; however, the energy cost is high for Na- ZSM-5. Cu-ZSM-5 converts less than 20% with a very high energy consumption. The anatase form of titania reduces up to 35% of NOx at a relatively high energy consumption (150J/L) when the catalyst is contained in the plasma region, but does not show any appreciable conversion when placed downstream from the reactor. This phenomenon is explained by photo-activation of anatase in the plasma.
Technical Paper

The Influence of Dilution Composition and Temperature Upon a Stratified Charge Spark Ignition Engine

2000-06-19
2000-01-1947
A thermodynamic model has been utilised in the analysis of a SI engine operating with a divided charge stratification system. Such a charge stratification system divides the cylinder charge into two distinct regions: a combustible charge around the spark plug and a dilution charge beyond this. The model has been utilised to reveal differing effects of both dilution charge composition (EGR or air) and temperature upon the performance and emissions of such a stratified charge engine.
Technical Paper

Effects of Fuel Composition on Mixture Formation in a Firing Direct-Injection Spark-Ignition (DISI) Engine: An Experimental Study using Mie-Scattering and Planar Laser-Induced Fluorescence (PLIF) Techniques

2000-06-19
2000-01-1904
Two-dimensional Mie-scattering and laser-induced fluorescence techniques were applied to investigate the effects of fuel composition on mixture formation within a firing direct-injection spark-ignition (DISI) engine. A comparison was made between the spray characteristics and in-cylinder fuel distributions resulting from the use of a typical multi-component gasoline (European specification premium-grade unleaded), a single-component research fuel (iso-octane), and a three-component research fuel (iso-pentane, iso-octane and n-nonane). Studies were performed at three different injection timings under cold and part-warm conditions. The results indicate that fuel composition affects both the initial spray formation and the subsequent mixture formation process. Furthermore, the sensitivity of the mixing process to the effects of fuel volatility was shown to depend on injection timing.
Technical Paper

Multiple Coherence Analysis on Engine Degree of Freedom Study for Exhaust System Testing

2000-03-06
2000-01-1193
An Automotive Exhaust System Structural Key Life Test has been successfully developed, in part, due to investigations into the boundary conditions of powertrain input. The powertrain (engine and trans-mission) degree-of-freedom study (here after referred to as engine) was investigated in order to determine the sensitivity of the exhaust system to engine motion. Understanding engine motion was necessary in order to establish proper control strategy in the laboratory simulation process. Accurate reproduction of exhaust system response to input road load events was crucial to reproducing known exhaust system fracture modes in early life wear-out conditions. A method multiple coherence analysis has been used to analytically measure the degree of severity between engine input motion and exhaust system output response by analyzing dynamic strain and acceleration. Removing one engine control input at a time, a multiple coherence function was calculated and the exhaust response computed.
Technical Paper

Redesign of an Exhaust Manifold Outlet Fastener Using Robust Design Techniques

2000-03-06
2000-01-0917
An L16 orthogonal array parameter Design of Experiment (DOE) evaluated six design parameters of the mating thread interface between the exhaust manifold outlet flange and jointing stainless steel fastener. The objective of this study was to identify optimal parameters for the redesign the thread interface by ensuring 100% seating of the fastener into the manifold flange (here after referred to as stud seating). Since the current fastener and manifold outlet flange interface threads do not always achieve the design objectives, due in part to a form of abrasive wear, consideration was given to develop a testing strategy that would quantify the amount of remaining thread engagement for a given stud length. This testing strategy ensured that the control parameters considered in this experiment would reveal main effects and interactions between the stud and tapped hole threads thus providing the necessary parameters for the redesign on the joint threads.
Technical Paper

The Use of Low Viscosity Oils to Improve Fuel Economy in Light Duty Diesel Engines

2000-06-19
2000-01-2054
Historically, fuel cost conscious customers have tended to purchase diesel passenger cars. However, with increasing competition from alternative fuels and lean burn and direct injection gasoline fuelled engines, diesel engined vehicles currently face tough challenges from the point of fuel economy and emissions. In gasoline engines, low viscosity friction modified oils have demonstrated their potential for reducing internal engine friction and thus improving fuel economy, without adversely effecting engine durability. These fuel economy improvements have led to the introduction of such a low viscosity friction modified 5W-30 oil as the initial and service fill for the majority of Ford products sold in Europe. The trend towards even lower viscosities continues. To assess the potential benefits and issues of moving to 5W-20 in diesel engines, a short pilot study has been conducted using a Ford 1.8l direct injection diesel engine.
Technical Paper

High Strength Steel Skid Plates: A Design Optimization Study

2001-10-16
2001-01-3069
The purpose of this paper is to show that certain steel skid plates can achieve up to a 50% weight reduction, with little or no increase in cost, by simply changing the shape and utilizing high strength steel. There are many factors that can influence the skid plate shape, including rail width, ground clearance, attachment points, drive shaft location, and the general shape of the object for which it is the skid plate's sole purpose to protect (fuel tank, transfer case, etc.). A skid plate is usually considered last from a design standpoint so that its design is dependent upon the environment which it is set in. For this reason, skid plates are generally heavy and flat to meet ground clearance requirements and have ribs inserted to increase stiffness. Sometimes design parameters require a skid plate to be heavy and flat. But more often, a stiffer lightweight design can be obtained.
Technical Paper

Flame Temperature Correlation of Emissions from Diesels Operated on Alternative Fuels

2001-05-07
2001-01-2014
Work by Plee, Ahmad, and coworkers in the 1980s [1, 2, 3, 4 and 5] showed that for changes in intake air state, Diesel NOx, soot, soluble organic fraction, and HC emissions could be correlated using the stoichiometric flame temperature calculated at SOC or peak pressure conditions. In the present work, similar flame temperature correlations are obtained for emissions from three test engines; a 1.2L high speed direct injection (HSDI) Diesel, a 2.4L HSDI Diesel, and a 2.34 L single cylinder direct injection (DI) Diesel engine, the first of which was tested using four alternative fuels. Use of the flame temperature correlations presented may reduce the number of engine tests required to evaluate the effects of EGR on emissions of NOx, particulate, and HC, even when alternative fuels are used.
Technical Paper

Fuel Permeation Performance of Polymeric Materials

2001-05-07
2001-01-1999
This paper presents an extensive set of permeation data on automotive fuel system materials. It adds significantly to the information provided by the same authors in SAE paper 983160 [1]. The permeation measurements refer to three different test fuels: fuel C, CE10 and CM15 at 40, 50 and 60°C. The materials examined include poly-ethylenes, nylons, polyketons, ethylene-vinyl alcohol copolymers, acetals, fluoropolymers and fluoroelastomers. These data are important in the design of automotive fuel system components capable of meeting LEVII or PZEV requirements. In particular, data of this kind are crucial in optimizing the permeation performance of multilayer structures for fuel system applications.
Technical Paper

Modeling of HCCI Combustion and Emissions Using Detailed Chemistry

2001-03-05
2001-01-1029
To help guide the design of homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) engines, single and multi-zone models of the concept are developed by coupling the first law of thermodynamics with detailed chemistry of hydrocarbon fuel oxidation and NOx formation. These models are used in parametric studies to determine the effect of heat loss, crevice volume, temperature stratification, fuel-air equivalence ratio, engine speed, and boosting on HCCI engine operation. In the single-zone model, the cylinder is assumed to be adiabatic and its contents homogeneous. Start of combustion and bottom dead center temperatures required for ignition to occur at top dead center are reported for methane, n-heptane, isooctane, and a mixture of 87% isooctane and 13% n-heptane by volume (simulated gasoline) for a variety of operating conditions.
Technical Paper

Experimental Studies on Controlled Auto-ignition (CAI) Combustion of Gasoline in a 4-Stroke Engine

2001-03-05
2001-01-1030
This paper presents results from an experimental programme researching the in-cylinder conditions necessary to obtain gasoline Controlled Auto-ignition (CAI) combustion in a 4-stroke engine. A single-cylinder, variable compression ratio research engine is used for all experiments. Investigations concentrate on establishing the CAI operating range with regard to Air/Fuel ratio and Exhaust Gas Re-circulation (EGR) and their effect on ignition timing, combustion rate and variability, ISFC, and engine-out emissions, such as NOx, CO, and unburned HC. Comprehensive maps for each of the measured variables are presented and in relevant cases, these results are compared to those obtained during normal spark-ignition operation so that the benefits of CAI combustion can be more fully appreciated.
Technical Paper

Quantification of Friction Component Engagement Controllability

2001-03-05
2001-01-1156
Conventional automatic transmissions (AT) use wet friction components, such as plate clutches and band brakes to engage gears or change speed ratios during vehicle operation. The quality of engagements and ratio changes depends greatly on the frictional characteristics of the friction components, which are typically evaluated with industry standard SAE #2 test machines. These inertia absorption-type dynamometer test stands energize a friction component with prescribed level of apply force and load of inertia flywheels rotating at a specified speed until the friction elements are brought to a stop. During the slip, apply force, engagement torque, and rotating speed are digitally recorded for visual evaluation of dynamic engagement behavior. The shape of the dynamic torque curve during the engagement is known to affect AT shift quality. When many curves are generated, it becomes intractable to quantify torque curve shape differences.
Technical Paper

Standard Test Method for Cavitation and Erosion-Corrosion Characteristics of Aluminum Pumps with Engine Coolants

2001-03-05
2001-01-1181
The ASTM D 2809 test method, “Standard Test Method For Cavitation Corrosion and Erosion-Corrosion Characteristics of Aluminum Pumps With Engine Coolants” was first published in 19691. The method involves a copper-pipe circuit through which coolant solution, heated to 113°C, is pumped at 103 kPa for 100 hours. The method was modified to change the pump used in the test in 1989. It was updated in 1994 to accommodate a change in the cleaning procedure and was subsequently reapproved by the ASTM D-15 Committee on Engine Coolants in 1999.2 Tests recently conducted on several modern coolants have produced “failing” results, but the coolants are performing well in the field. Further, the repeatability and reproducibility of the method have been questioned. A round-robin series of tests sponsored by the Ford Motor Company revealed significant variations and cause for concern.
Technical Paper

Air Charge Estimation in Camless Engines

2001-03-05
2001-01-0581
An electromechanically driven valve train offers unprecedented flexibility to optimize engine operation for each speed load point individually. One of the main benefits is the increased fuel economy resulting from unthrottled operation. The absence of a restriction at the entrance of the intake manifold leads to wave propagation in the intake system and makes a direct measurement of air flow with a hot wire air meter unreliable. To deliver the right amount of fuel for a desired air-fuel ratio, we therefore need an open loop estimate of the air flow based on measureable or commanded signals or quantities. This paper investigates various expressions for air charge in camless engines based on quasi-static assumptions for heat transfer and pressure.
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