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Technical Paper

Application of a MIC Metallic Flake ASA/PC Weatherable Resin Predictive Engineering Package

2006-04-03
2006-01-0135
The automotive industry continues to strive for mold-in-color (MIC) solutions that can provide metallic flake appearances. These MIC solutions can offer a substantial cost out opportunity while retaining a balance of weathering performance and physical properties. This paper discusses a predictive engineering package used to hide, minimize and eliminate flow lines. Material requirements and the methods used to evaluate flowline reduction and placement for visual inspection criteria are detailed. The Nissan Quest® luggage-rack covers are used to illustrate this application. The paper also explores how evolving predictive packages offer expanding possibilities.
Technical Paper

Flexible Fuel and manufacturing dispersion

2008-10-07
2008-36-0310
Back to the non Flex Fuel vehicles, the knock control system was designed and calibrated to absorb differences between engines (mainly compression ratio) and to protect the engine against knock damage (a correction up to 4 degrees BTDC was usually enough). But now, two new variables get in the scene: Flexible Fuel strategy, working from E22 to E100 (all blends in between) and small displacement (1.0 liter) high compression ratio engines. In this new scenario the system must be capable of correcting all spark advance differences, once knock control system acts as a safety feature, protecting the engine even if the fuel learning shows some deviation. In addition to that, we have the compression ratio variation between minimum and maximum limits. Since the engine is small (as well its combustion chamber), each tenth of a millimeter difference during manufacturing process, results in an important final compression ratio variation.
Technical Paper

Reduction of Instrument Panel Manufacturing Cost by Using Design Optimization

1998-09-29
982370
This paper highlights the application of design optimization in reducing product manufacturing cost without compromising product performance. By using a topology optimization method, the manufacturing cost of a clam shell has been reduced by approximately one-third, while maintaining the NVH performance of the steering column that is connected to the instrument panel (IP) through the clam shell. Two different optimization approaches and two different topological weld deployments are investigated. It is found that a fully-deployed seam weld approach with automatic optimization provides the best design results.
Technical Paper

A Low Cost, Lightweight Solution for Soft Seamless Airbag Systems

2004-03-08
2004-01-1485
OEM and Tier One integrated suppliers are in constant search of cockpit system components that reduce the overall number of breaks across smooth surfaces. Traditionally, soft instrument panels with seamless airbag systems have required a separate airbag door and a tether or steel hinge mechanism to secure the door during a deployment. In addition, a scoring operation is necessary to ensure predictable, repeatable deployment characteristics. The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the development and performance of a cost-effective soft instrument panel with a seamless airbag door that results in a reduced number of parts and a highly efficient manufacturing process. Because of the unique characteristics of this material, a cost-effective, lightweight solution to meet both styling requirements, as well as safety and performance criteria, can be attained.
Technical Paper

Use of Parametric Modeling in the Development of Energy Absorber Applications

2002-03-04
2002-01-1226
Automotive styling and performance trends continue to challenge engineers to develop cost effective bumper systems that can provide efficient energy absorption and also fit within reduced package spaces. Through a combination of material properties and design, injection-molded engineering thermoplastic (ETP) energy absorption systems using polycarbonate/polybutylene terephthalate (PC/PBT) alloys have been shown to promote faster loading and superior energy absorption efficiency than conventional foam systems. This allows the ETP system to provide the required impact protection within a smaller package space. In order to make optimal use of this efficiency, the reinforcing beam and energy absorber (EA) must be considered together as an energy management system. This paper describes the development of a predictive tool created to simplify and shorten the process of engineering efficient and cost effective beam/EA energy management systems.
Technical Paper

Predicting the Bumper System Response of Engineering Thermoplastic Energy Absorbers with Steel Beams

2002-03-04
2002-01-1228
An efficient energy absorber (EA) will absorb impact energy through a combination of elastic and plastic deformation. However, the EA is typically coupled with a steel reinforcing beam, which can also elastically and plastically deform during an impact event. In order to design and optimize an EA/Beam system that will meet the specified vehicle impact requirements, the response of the entire assembly must be accurately predicted. This paper will describe a finite element procedure and material model that can be used to predict the impact response of a bumper system composed of an injection molded thermoplastic energy absorber attached to a steel beam. The first step in the process was to identify the critical material, geometric, and boundary condition parameters involved in the EA and Beam individually. Next, the two models were combined to create the system model. Actual test results for 8km/hr.
Technical Paper

First One-Piece, Injection-Molded Thermoplastic Front-Bumper System for a Light Truck

1998-02-23
980107
The first single-piece, injection-molded, thermoplastic, front bumper for a light truck provides improved performance and reduced cost for the 1997 MY Explorer® Ltd. and 1988 MY Mountaineer® truck from Ford Motor Company. Additionally, the system provides improved impact performance, including the ability to pass 5.6 km/hr barrier impact tests without damage. Further, the advanced, 1-piece design integrates fascia attachments, reducing assembly time, and weighs 8.76 kg/bumper less than a baseline steel design. The complete system provides a cost savings vs. extruded aluminum and is competitive with steel bumpers.
Technical Paper

Consistency of Thermoplastic Bumper Beam Impact Performance

1998-02-23
980113
This paper will address several critical aspects of bumper system performance, including vehicle damage protection and crash-severity sensing considerations, energy-absorption capacity and efficiency, and low-speed impact consistency and sensitivity to temperature changes. The objective is to help engineers and designers establish a realistic perspective of the capability of the various technologies based on actual test performance. The scope of the evaluation will include a comparison of several bumper-beam material constructions when subjected to a 16-km/hr swinging barrier impact over a range of temperatures the bumper could see in service (-30 to 60C).
Technical Paper

Correlation of Thermal Cycle Tests to Field Usage Profiles for Solder Joints in Automotive Electronics

1998-02-23
980344
This paper reviews the physics-of-failure model for accelerated thermal cycle tests of solder joints associated with various electronics components, summarizes the parameters of the automotive environment, and discusses the methods for developing thermal cycle tests for reliability validation for automotive electronics. The paper proposes an approach to develop the requirements for validation tests based on the customer usage profiles and the desired product life goal. This requirement determines the nominal testing duration based on the equivalent damage generated from the worst-case field applications.
Technical Paper

Thermoformed Soft Instrument Panel

2003-03-03
2003-01-1171
The automotive industry is continually striving for opportunities to take additional cost and mass out of vehicle systems. Large parts such as an Instrument Panel retainer are good candidates because a small percent reduction in mass can translate into a significant material mass savings. Multiple requirements for a soft instrument panel including safety, stiffness, adhesion, etc. can make these savings difficult to achieve. This paper will describe how a new material and process development for the fabrication of a soft instrument panel can produce 50% weight savings with a 20% cost reduction potential. In addition, this new technology exhibits improved performance over existing materials during safety testing.
Technical Paper

Throttle Position Sensor Components Assembly Integrated into the Throttle Body Manufacturing Process

2002-11-19
2002-01-3391
In the engine management systems field, there is lack of sensors locally built and available for sale in Brazil. Therefore, many auto parts companies have to import them affecting directly the final products costs (technology know-how/development costs, import taxes and other material handling/custom related costs). This paper was motivated to study an alternative for a simple, cheaper and locally made throttle position sensor. The choose of this part was because the fact that it is one of the most expensive in the throttle body bill of. For developing this new alternative, it was used a tool called value analysis and value engineering. The outcome of this study was a throttle position sensor function integrated to the throttle body manufacturing line with the advantages that 100% components can be locally purchased, improved robustness against humidity and component quantity reduction by 40%. Therefore achieving more value added.
Technical Paper

Two-Shot and Overmolding Technology for Automotive Applications Using Engineering Thermoplastics

2002-03-04
2002-01-0274
There are a multitude of opportunities to utilize two-shot or overmolding technology in the automotive industry. Two-shot or overmolding a thermoplastic elastomer onto a rigid substrate can produce visually appealing, high quality parts. In addition, use of this technology can offer the molder significant reductions in labor and floor space consumption as well as a reduction in system cost. Traditionally, two-shot applications were limited to olefinbased TPE's and substrates, which often restricted rigidity, structure and gloss levels. With the development of thermoplastic elastomers that bond to engineering thermoplastics, two-shot molding can now produce parts that require higher heat, higher gloss and greater structural rigidity. This paper will outline engineering thermoplastics that bond with these new elastomers, discuss potential applications, and review circumstances that offer the best opportunity to call upon the advantages of two-shot and overmolding technology.
Technical Paper

Application of a Lean Cellular Design Decomposition to Automotive Component Manufacturing System Design

1999-05-10
1999-01-1620
A design framework based on the principles of lean manufacturing and axiomatic design was used as a guideline for designing an automotive component manufacturing system. A brief overview of this design decomposition is given to review its structure and usefulness. Examples are examined to demonstrate how this design framework was applied to the design of a gear manufacturing system. These examples demonstrate the impact that low-level design decisions can have on high-level system objectives and the need for a systems-thinking approach in manufacturing system design. Results are presented to show the estimated performance improvements resulting from the new system design.
Technical Paper

A Journey Towards Technical Competency in Plastics Process Simulation

1999-05-10
1999-01-1640
Plastics manufacturing technology is rapidly changing. The use of process simulation to increase competitiveness has proliferated. Visteon Automotive Systems is committed to developing competent workforce and niche capabilities in plastics processing simulation. In this paper the current capabilities and future development plan for plastic process simulation are discussed. An integrated concurrent engineering process has been developed and implemented to deliver high quality robust plastics automotive products and systems. This paper highlights the technological advancements achieved by Visteon in the field of analytical simulation of common manufacturing processes. In addition, future development initiatives towards the technical competency in plastics manufacturing simulation are discussed throughout the manuscript.
Technical Paper

Three-Dimensional Heat Transfer & Thermoelastic Deformation Predictions in Forward Lighting

2000-03-06
2000-01-1396
The thermal performance of an automotive forward-lighting assembly is predicted with a computational fluid-dynamics (CFD) program. A three-dimensional, steady-state heat-transfer model seeks to account for convection and radiation within the enclosure, conduction through the thermoplastic walls and lens, and external convection and radiation losses. The predicted temperatures agree well with experimental thermocouple and infrared data on the housing. Driven by the thermal expansion of the air near the bulb surface, counter-rotating recirculation zones are predicted within the enclosure. The highest temperatures in the plastic components are predicted on the inner surface of the shelf above the bulb where airflow rising from the hot bulb surface impinges.
Technical Paper

Seat System Key Life Test

2000-03-06
2000-01-1190
An accelerated seat durability test was developed to identify potential problems in areas with traditionally high warranty cost and customer dissatisfaction: squeak & rattle and mechanism looseness & efforts. The test inputs include temperature, humidity, road vibration, occupant movements, and mechanism cycling. These inputs were combined into a single 14-day test profile that simulates 10 years and 250,000 km. (approximately 150,000 miles) of 95th percentile customer usage. Various components of the seat assembly are tested together as a system. The test was performed on two current production programs. The test produced issues similar to those found in warranty repair data and evaluations of used seats from high-mileage customer-owned vehicles.
Technical Paper

Lightweight Thermoplastic Composite Throttle Bodies for Car and Truck Applications

2001-03-05
2001-01-1140
The drive to reduce weight, simplify assembly, and cut total system cost in today's vehicles is relentless. Replacing metal systems with thermoplastics has been of considerable interest in the engineering community. The current generations of engineering thermoplastic resins are enabling the use of plastic systems in demanding underhood applications. Technical data and discussion regarding the materials, design, molding, and assembly of lightweight composite throttle bodies will be presented in this paper. Comparisons with machined aluminum throttle housings are drawn to establish a baseline with the throttle body housing component that is most common in production today. Design flexibility and process simplification are some of the approaches highlighted. Much of the technical information provided in the paper applies to both cable driven mechanical throttle bodies as well as electronic throttle bodies under development.
Technical Paper

Temperature Measurement Errors in Automotive Lighting

2001-03-05
2001-01-0859
This paper examines a variety of thermocouple and infrared measurement techniques as means of obtaining accurate and consistent temperature measurements within a headlamp system. While measuring temperature is straightforward in principle, in practice, these measurements are fraught with potential error. The paper summarizes a succession of experiments conducted at our Parts Design Center (formerly the Application Development Resource Center) in Pittsfield, MA. These experiments lead to the ability to accurately measure temperature at a given location within a lamp assembly. Using these studies and the resulting transfer functions as a foundation, a Design of Experiment (D.O.E.) is presented which explores the effect of a variety of headlamp design factors on the surface temperature of a headlamp reflector at a given location.
Technical Paper

Thinwall Injection Molding for Instrument Panels

2001-03-05
2001-01-1272
As the global auto industry wrote the final chapter on its first century, we saw the average thickness of an automotive instrument panel drop from 3.0 mm-3.5 mm to 2.0 mm-2.3 mm, as found in the 1999 Volkswagen Jetta and Golf. By reducing the wall thickness of the instrument panel, Volkswagen started an industry trend: both OEMs and tiers are investigating technologies to produce parts that combine a lower cost-per-part via material optimization and cycle-time reduction with the superior performance of engineering thermoplastics. The goal is to produce parts that are positioned more competitively at every stage of the development cycle - from design, to manufacturing, to assembly, to “curb appeal” on the showroom floor. The key to this manufacturing and design “sweet spot” is a technology called thinwall - the molding of plastic parts from engineering thermoplastics with wall thicknesses thinner than conventional parts of similar geometry.
Technical Paper

Engineering the 1999 Mercury Cougar Hybrid Instrument Panel

1999-03-01
1999-01-0692
In a joint effort between Ford Motor Company, Visteon Automotive Systems, Textron Automotive Company, and Dow Automotive the 1999 Mercury Cougar instrument panel (IP) was designed and engineered to reduce the weight and overall cost of the IP system. The original IP architecture changed from a traditional design that relied heavily upon the steel structure to absorb and dissipate unbelted occupant energy during frontal collisions to a hybrid design that utilizes both plastic and steel to manage energy. This design approach further reduced IP system weight by 1.88 Kg and yielded significant system cost savings. The hybrid instrument panel architecture in the Cougar utilizes a steel cross car beam coupled to steel energy absorbing brackets and a ductile thermoplastic substrate. The glove box assembly and the driver knee bolster are double shell injection molded structures that incorporate molded-in ribs for added stiffness.
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