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Technical Paper

Application of Hydraulic Body Mounts to Reduce the Freeway Hop Shake of Pickup Trucks

2009-05-19
2009-01-2126
When pickup trucks are driven on concrete paved freeways, freeway hop shake is a major complaint. Freeway hop shake occurs when the vehicle passes over the concrete joints of the freeway which impose in-phase harmonic road inputs. These road inputs excite vehicle modes that degrade ride comfort. The worst shake level occurs when the vehicle speed is such that the road input excites the vehicle 1st bending mode and/or the rear wheel hop mode. The hop and bending mode are very close in frequency. This phenomenon is called freeway hop shake. Automotive manufacturers are searching for ways to mitigate freeway hop shake. There are several ways to reduce the shake amplitude. This paper documents a new approach using hydraulic body mounts to reduce the shake. A full vehicle analytical model was used to determine the root cause of the freeway hop shake.
Technical Paper

Music Analogy: An Alternative Strategy for Sound Quality Requirements

2005-05-16
2005-01-2477
In recent years a predominant strategy for setting sound quality (SQ) requirements has been the sensory correlation approach (also called sensory evaluation or sensory science). Some users of this approach have reported their progress in numerous papers. Other SQ practitioners have made presentations on specific topics that show the linkage to music and musical notation. These specific links point to an alternative general strategy - “the Music Analogy for Sound Quality.” This paper begins by comparing the general methods of the music analogy and sensory correlation. Some major differences will be identified and implications discussed. Some existing specific tools for the music analogy will be identified as well as some gaps that need to be filled. Finally, reasons will be presented concerning why the music analogy should be considered when developing sound quality requirements.
Technical Paper

Pad Insulator Modeling for Brake Squeal Analysis

2005-05-16
2005-01-2314
Brake insulators often offer optimal solutions to squeal noise. In the process of engineering solutions to reduce the brake noise, a system-level finite element complex eigenvalue analysis is often used and has gained popularity in recent years. Models of insulators have also been proposed for system-level evaluation, however many challenges remain in efficiently implementing an insulator model, owing to complexities of the insulator component model. The complexities arise from the visco-elastic behavior (primarily the frequency and temperature dependence), and the thin polymer/steel multi-layer nature of the construction - typical in an insulator. As a first part of a joint investigation, this paper explores the nature of frequency and temperature dependence in insulator models and reduces the cumbersome multi-layer model into a simpler form that can be more easily implemented in a typical brake system stability analysis.
Technical Paper

Simulation of Vehicle Exterior Sound Fields by High Frequency Boundary Element Method

2005-05-16
2005-01-2328
With Statistical Energy Analysis (SEA) proven to be a powerful tool for airborne noise analysis, the capability of predicting the exterior sound field around a vehicle at high frequencies (the load case in the SEA analysis) is of particular interest to OEMs and suppliers. This paper employs the High Frequency Boundary Element Method (HFBEM) to simulate the scattered exterior sound field distribution due to a monopole source. It is shown that the proposed method is able to efficiently predict the spatial and frequency averaged sound pressure levels reasonably well up to 10 kHz, even at points in the near field of the vehicle body.
Technical Paper

SEA Modeling of A Vehicle Door System

2005-05-16
2005-01-2427
The Door system is one of the major paths for vehicle interior noise under a variety of load conditions. In this paper we consider the elements of the door lower (excluding glass) in terms of noise transmission. Passenger car doors are comprised of the outer skin, door cavity, door inner sheet metal, vapor barrier, and interior trim. Statistical Energy Analysis (SEA) models must effectively describe these components in terms of their acoustic properties and capture the dominant behaviors relative to the overall door system. In addition, the models must interface seamlessly with existing vehicle level SEA models. SEA modeling techniques for the door components are discussed with door STL testing and model correlation results.
Technical Paper

Evaluation of the Revised ISO362 Standard for Vehicle Exterior Noise Measurement

2005-05-16
2005-01-2417
The International Organization for Standardization (ISO) has developed a new measurement procedure, ISO362:200X, for vehicle exterior noise. This proposed standard covers motorcycles, light duty vehicles, and heavy-duty vehicles. The intent of the new procedure is to measure vehicle noise consistent with typical urban operation. SAE has conducted a cooperative research program to evaluate the new ISO procedure for light duty vehicles with regard to the intent of the procedure, technical, and practical considerations. The results of the cooperative research program indicate the new ISO procedure meets the intent of measuring typical traffic noise and does so in a technically correct and practically achievable manner.
Technical Paper

Hardware-in-the-Loop Testing for Electrochemical Cells in Hybrid Electric Vehicles

2005-11-01
2005-01-3500
Hardware-in-the-Loop (HWIL) testing is a means for validating and verifying component designs in a system context. Most current HWIL work with electrochemical systems for automotive applications has focused on the pack level, providing valuable feedback to system designers. Further benefits are realized by implementing this concept earlier in the development process; applying test vectors to an individual cell, but attenuating the stimulus and feedback to pack levels. This paper reports on a cell-level HWIL system designed to evaluate electrochemical cells and associated subsystems for advanced hybrid-electric vehicles (HEVs). The architecture of the system is described along with an example of its application applied to a commercially available supercapacitor and a state-of-charge algorithm in an HEV-based configuration.
Technical Paper

Analytical Approach to the Robust Design of Dimensional Datum Schemes

2006-04-03
2006-01-0500
This paper presents the fundamental principles of variation analysis and robust design for dimensional datum schemes. The kinematics equations for rigid body motions are simplified through linearization. The simplified formulations explicitly relate the dimensional deviations of a rigid part with its datum scheme configuration and dimensional variations at datum target points. This simplified approach can be used with either the first order Taylor series approximation or Monte Carlo simulation to study the statistical characteristics of datum scheme variations. A headlamp case study is presented that shows the application procedures and demonstrates that both Taylor series and Monte Carlo methods generate comparable results, but the former offers more efficiency and convenience due to its close form formulation. This approach has found many applications especially in on-site problem solving and fast what-if studies.
Technical Paper

The USAMP Magnesium Powertrain Cast Components Project

2006-04-03
2006-01-0522
Over the past five years, the US Automotive Materials Partnership (USAMP) has brought together representatives from DaimlerChrysler, General Motors, Ford Motor Company and over 40 other participant companies from the Mg casting industry to create and test a low-cost, Mg-alloy engine that would achieve a 15 - 20 % Mg component weight savings with no compromise in performance or durability. The block, oil pan, and front cover were redesigned to take advantage of the properties of both high-pressure die cast (HPDC) and sand cast Mg creep- resistant alloys. This paper describes the alloy selection process and the casting and testing of these new Mg-variant components. This paper will also examine the lessons learned and implications of this pre-competitive technology for future applications.
Technical Paper

Fundamental Dynamics of Steering Wheel Torsional Vibration on Smooth Roads

2006-04-03
2006-01-0564
Steering Wheel Torsional Vibration (SWTV) at highway speed on smooth roads is one important attribute affecting vehicle refinement. To ensure desirable SWTV performance, achieve the best design compromises and minimize the development cost, specific design targets need to be defined and the proposed design needs to be assessed very early in the vehicle development cycle. In this paper, the fundamental dynamics of SWTV are analyzed and examples are given to demonstrate the strategies to reduce the SWTV response. Influence of design parameters on the SWTV response is predicted for four vehicle platforms. General guidelines for designing suspension and steering systems are discussed to ensure achieving SWTV targets.
Technical Paper

Design of a Rapid Prototyping Engine Management System for Development of Combustion Feedback Control Technology

2006-04-03
2006-01-0611
Combustion feedback using cylinder pressure sensors, ion current sensors or alternative sensing techniques is actively under investigation by the automotive industry to meet future legislative emissions requirements. One of the drawbacks of many rapid prototyping engine management systems is their available analog interfaces, often limited to 10-12 bits with limited bandwidth, sampling rate and very simple anti-aliasing filters. Processing cylinder pressure or other combustion feedback sensors requires higher precision, wider bandwidths and more processing power than is typically available. For these reasons, Ricardo in collaboration with GM Research has developed a custom, high precision analog input subsystem for the rCube rapid prototyping control system that is specifically targeted at development of combustion feedback control systems.
Technical Paper

High Temperature Oxidation/Corrosion Performance of Various Materials for Exhaust System Applications

2006-04-03
2006-01-0605
Durability requirements for exhaust materials have resulted in the increased use of stainless steels throughout the exhaust system. The conversion of carbon steel exhaust flanges to stainless steel has occurred on many vehicles. Ferritic stainless steels are commonly used for exhaust flanges. Flange construction methods include stamped sheet steel, thick plate flanges and powder metal designs. Flange material selection criteria may include strength, oxidation resistance, weldability and cold temperature impact resistance. Flange geometry considerations include desired stiffness criteria, flange rotation, gasket/sealing technique and vehicle packaging. Both the material selection and flange geometry are considered in terms of meeting the desired durability and cost. The cyclic oxidation performance of the material is a key consideration when selecting flange materials.
Technical Paper

Combustion Characteristics of a Spray-Guided Direct-Injection Stratified-Charge Engine with a High-Squish Piston

2005-04-11
2005-01-1937
This work describes an experimental investigation on the stratified combustion and engine-out emissions characteristics of a single-cylinder, spark-ignition, direct-injection, spray-guided engine employing an outward-opening injector, an optimized high-squish, bowled piston, and a variable swirl valve control. Experiments were performed using two different outward-opening injectors with 80° and 90° spray angles, each having a variable injector pintle-lift control allowing different rates of injection. The fuel consumption of the engine was found to improve with decreasing air-swirl motion, increasing spark-plug length, increasing spark energy, and decreasing effective rate of injection, but to be relatively insensitive to fuel-rail pressure in the range of 10-20 MPa. At optimal injection and ignition timings, no misfires were observed in 30,000 consecutive cycles.
Technical Paper

Ecotec 2.4L VVT: A Variant of GM's Global 4-Cylinder Engine

2005-04-11
2005-01-1941
General Motors adds a larger displacement more powerful variant to its global 4-cylinder engine family. The new Ecotec 2.4L VVT, being introduced in the 2006 Pontiac Solstice is the latest variant within the Ecotec engine family. This new engine is built on the heritage and excellent reputation of the Ecotec 2.2L(1), the global 4-cylinder engine introduced for the North American market in the 2000 model year Saturn L-series. Ecotec engines are now offered in many additional GM platforms in North America as well as in Europe. The Ecotec 2.4L VVT shares many parts with the Ecotec 2.2L(1), with addition of cam phaser technology to enable variable valve timing (VVT) along with several structural enhancements. The Ecotec 2.4L VVT produces 25% more power, impressive torque at lower engine speeds and offers a number of other advantages.
Technical Paper

2006 Chevrolet Corvette C6 Z06 Aerodynamic Development

2005-04-11
2005-01-1943
This paper is intended to give a general overview of the key aerodynamic developments for the 2006 Chevrolet Corvette C6 Z06. Significant computational and wind tunnel time were used to develop the 2006 Z06 to provide it with improved high speed stability, increased cooling capability and equivalent drag compared to the 2004 Chevrolet Corvette C5 Z06.
Technical Paper

Evaluation of Automatic Fire Suppression Systems in Full Scale Vehicle Fire Tests and Static Vehicle Fire Tests

2005-04-11
2005-01-1788
A prototype fire suppression system was tested in one full-scale vehicle crash tests and three static vehicle fire tests. The prototype fire suppression system consisted of 2 Solid Propellant Gas Generators and two optical detectors. These components were installed on the hood of the test vehicle. A vehicle crash test and a series of static vehicle fire tests were performed to determine the effectiveness of this prototype fire suppression systems in extinguishing fires in the engine compartment of a crashed vehicle
Technical Paper

The Supercharged Northstar DOHC 4.4L V8 Engine for Cadillac

2005-04-11
2005-01-1854
A new high output supercharged Northstar DOHC 4.4L V8 engine has been developed for new “V” series Cadillac performance models. The new engine combines the highest power rating of any production Cadillac engine to date with operating refinement uncommon at this power level. The new engine incorporates a high capacity airflow system including a unique GM Powertrain (GMPT) patented supercharger. The design integrates the intake manifold and supercharger (SC) into a supercharger module (SCM) supplied with throttle body (TB) and intercoolers (IC). The new engine architecture is based on the naturally aspirated (NA) rear wheel drive (RWD) engine released in 2004, but has been specifically designed and upgraded from the NA version for the greater structural and thermal loads that result from supercharging.
Technical Paper

Design of a Full-Scale Impact System for Analysis of Vehicle Pedestrian Collisions

2005-04-11
2005-01-1875
The complexity of vehicle-pedestrian collisions necessitates extensive validation of pedestrian computational models. While body components can be individually simulated, overall validation of human pedestrian models requires full-scale testing with post mortem human surrogates (PMHS). This paper presents the development of a full-scale pedestrian impact test plan and experimental design that will be used to perform PMHS tests to validate human pedestrian models. The test plan and experimental design is developed based on the analysis of a combination of literature review, multi-body modeling, and epidemiologic studies. The proposed system has proven effective in testing an anthropometrically correct rescue dummy in multiple instances. The success of these tests suggests the potential for success in a full-scale pedestrian impact test using a PMHS.
Technical Paper

Application of Experimental Transfer Path Analysis and Hybrid FRF-Based Substructuring Model to SUV Axle Noise

2005-04-11
2005-01-1833
This paper describes an axle gear whine noise reduction process that was developed and applied using a combination of experimental and analytical methods. First, an experimental Transfer Path Analysis (TPA) was used to identify major noise paths. Next, modeling and forced response simulation were conducted using the Hybrid FEA-Experimental FRF method known as HYFEX [1]. The HYFEX model consisted of an experimental FRF representation of the frame/body and a finite element (FE) model of the driveline [2] and suspension. The FE driveline model was calibrated using experimental data. The HYFEX model was then used to simulate the axle noise reduction that would be obtained using a modified frame, prior to the availability of a prototype. Hardware testing was used as the final step in the process to confirm the results of the simulation.
Technical Paper

Bolt-load Retention Testing of Magnesium Alloys for Automotive Applications

2006-04-03
2006-01-0072
For automotive applications at elevated temperatures, the need for sufficient creep resistance of Mg alloys is often associated with retaining appropriate percentages of initial clamp loads in bolt joints. This engineering property is often referred to as bolt-load retention (BLR); BLR testing is a practical method to quantify the bolt load with time for engineering purposes. Therefore, standard BLR test procedures for automotive applications are desired. This report summarizes the effort in the Structural Cast Magnesium Development (SCMD) project under the United States Automotive Materials Partnership (USAMP), to provide a technical basis for recommending a general-purpose and a design-purpose BLR test procedures for BLR testing of Mg alloys for automotive applications. The summary includes results of factors influencing BLR and related test techniques from open literature, automotive industry and research carried out in this laboratory project.
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