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Technical Paper

PEM Fuel Cell System Solutions for Transportation

2000-03-06
2000-01-0373
PEM Fuel Cell technology has been advancing rapidly during the last several years as evidenced by various vehicle demonstrations by the major automotive companies. As the development continues to bring hardware to automotive system level solutions, many engineering challenges arise. This paper will deal with two (2) of these areas from an automotive system level perspective: Thermal Management and the Fuel Cell Stack. Both of these sub-system areas are critical to the success of the technology in meeting the requirements of tomorrow's automotive customer.
Technical Paper

Life-cycle Management in the Automotive Supply Chain: Results of a Survey of Saturn Tier I Suppliers

2000-04-26
2000-01-1463
Saturn Corporation and its suppliers are partnering with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Design for the Environment (DfE) Program and the University of Tennessee (UT) Center for Clean Products and Clean Technologies (CCPCT) in a project to develop a model for life-cycle management (LCM). This paper presents key findings from the first phase of the project, a survey by Saturn of its suppliers to determine their interests and needs for a supply chain LCM project, and identifies framework strategies for successful LCM.
Technical Paper

Architecture for Robust Efficiency:GM's “Precept” PNGV Vehicle

2000-04-02
2000-01-1582
General Motors is developing a hybrid electric concept vehicle from its “Precept” high efficiency vehicle architecture, to satisfy requirements of the Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles (PNGV) program. This Technology Demonstration Vehicle (TDV) features fundamental architecture that is unconventional compared to contemporary passenger car design, or even to other hybrid vehicles. This paper describes this unique architecture and how the vehicle's most significant features complement each other in harmonious design. It also notes how these features contribute to robustness of efficiency.
Technical Paper

Rationale for Technology Selections in GM's PNGV Precept Concept Car Based on Systems Analysis

2000-04-02
2000-01-1567
The CY2000 cornerstone goal of the Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles (PNGV) is the demonstration in CY 2000 of a 5-passenger vehicle with fuel economy of up 80 mpg (3 l/100km). As a PNGV partner, GM will demonstrate a technology-demonstration concept vehicle, the Precept, having a lightweight aluminum-intensive body, hybrid-electric propulsion system and a portfolio of efficient vehicle technologies. This paper describes: 1) the strategy for the vehicle design including mass requirements, 2) the selection of dual axle application of regenerative braking and electric traction, and 3) the complementary perspective on energy management strategy. This paper outlines information developed through systems analysis that drove technology selections. The systems analyses relied on vehicle simulation models to estimate fuel economy associated with technology selections. Modeling analyses included consideration of both federal test requirements and more severe driving situations.
Technical Paper

Acoustical Advantages of a New Polypropylene Absorbing Material

1999-05-17
1999-01-1669
Sound absorption is one way to control noise in automotive passenger compartments. Fibrous or porous materials absorb sound in a cavity by dissipating energy associated with a propagating sound wave. The objective of this study was to evaluate the acoustic performance of a cotton fiber absorbing material in comparison to a new polypropylene fibrous material, called ECOSORB ®. The acoustical evaluation was done using measurements of material properties along with sound pressure level from road testing of a fully-assembled vehicle. The new polypropylene fibrous material showed significant advantages over the cotton fiber materials in material properties testing and also in-vehicle measurements. In addition to the performance benefits, the polypropylene absorber provided weight savings over the cotton fiber material.
Technical Paper

Development and Experimental Evaluation of a Vehicle Structural-Acoustic Trimmed-Body Model

1999-05-17
1999-01-1798
A structural-acoustic finite-element model of an automobile trimmed-body is developed and experimentally evaluated for predicting body vibration and interior noise for frequencies up to 200 Hz. The structural-acoustic model is developed by coupling finite element models of trimmed-body structure and the passenger-compartment acoustic cavity. Frequency-response-function measurements of the structural vibration and interior acoustic response for shaker excitation of a trimmed body are used to assess the accuracy of the structural-acoustic model.
Technical Paper

Guidelines for Jury Evaluations of Automotive Sounds

1999-05-17
1999-01-1822
The following document is a set of guidelines intended to be used as a reference for the practicing automotive sound quality (SQ) engineer with the potential for application to the field of general consumer product sound quality. Practicing automotive sound quality engineers are those individuals responsible for understanding and/or conducting the physical and perceptual measurement of automotive sound. This document draws upon the experience of the four authors and thus contains many “rules-of-thumb” which the authors have found to work well in their many automotive related sound quality projects over the past years. When necessary, more detailed publications are referenced. The intent of publication of this document is to provide a reference to assist in automotive sound quality work efforts and to solicit feedback from the general sound quality community as to the completeness of the material presented.
Technical Paper

The Importance of Sealing Pass-Through Locations Via the Front of Dash Barrier Assembly

1999-05-17
1999-01-1802
An improvement in a vehicle's front of dash barrier assembly's acoustical performance has in the past been addressed by both adding individual absorbers and increasing the overall weight of the dash sound barrier assembly. Depending upon the target market of the vehicle, adding mass may not be an option for improved acoustical performance. Understanding the value of an increase in vehicle mass and / or cost for a specific level of improved acoustical performance continues to plague both Original Equipment Manufacturer (OEM) Engineers and Purchasing representatives. This paper examines the importance of properly sealing the front of dash pass-through areas and offers recommendations which can improve the overall vehicle acoustical performance without the addition of cost and mass to the vehicle.
Technical Paper

Static Load Sharing Characteristics of Transmission Planetary Gear Sets: Model and Experiment

1999-03-01
1999-01-1050
One of the most common applications of planetary (epi-cyclic) gear sets is found in automotive transmissions. A planetary gear set typically total torque applied to be shared by multiple planets making a higher power density possible. This advantage of the planetary gear sets relies heavily on the assumption that each pinion carries an equal share of the total torque applied. However, in production, gear manufacturing and assembly variations along with certain design parameters may prevent equal load sharing among the planets. Here, a generalized mathematical model of a single-stage planetary gear set having n planets is developed to predict load shared by each planet under quasi-static conditions. The model takes into account effects of two most common errors including pinion carrier errors and gear run-out errors. Results of an experimental test program are used to validate the predictions of the model. Generalized guidelines for equal load sharing are also presented.
Technical Paper

Percentile Frequency Method for Evaluating Impulsive Sounds

1999-05-17
1999-01-1851
The Percentile Frequency method originated in an attempt to quantify the frequency content of door slam sounds. The method is based on the Specific Loudness Patterns of Zwicker Loudness. Zwicker states that the area of the Specific Loudness Pattern is proportional to the total loudness. The method summarizes each Pattern as seven frequencies identifying the contributions of fixed percentages of the total area (i.e. 10%, 20%, 30%, 50%, 70%, 80% and 90%). Applying the method to each Pattern in a time series generates a family of curves representing the change in relative frequency content with time. The process, in effect, normalizes the frequency content of the impulse for loudness and reduces the data to a two dimensional plot. On a Percentile Frequency plot a simple impulse appears as a pattern of “nested, inverted check marks.” More complicated impulses, such as rattles, have more complicated shapes that are still “nested” together.
Technical Paper

Use of Repeated Crash-Tests to Determine Local Longitudinal and Shear Stiffness of the Vehicle Front with Crush

1999-03-01
1999-01-0637
Crash-test-data on local longitudinal and shear stiffness of the vehicle front is needed to estimate impact severity from car deformation in offset or pole impacts, and to predict vehicle acceleration and compartment intrusion in car-to-car crashes. Repeated full frontal crash-tests were carried out with a load-cell barrier to determine the local longitudinal stiffness with increasing crush. Repeated off-set tests were run to determine shear stiffness. Two single high-speed tests (full frontal and offset) were carried out and compared to the repeated tests to determine the rate sensitivity of the front structure. Four repetitions at 33.4 km/h provided equivalent energy absorption to a single 66.7 km/h test, when rebound was considered. Power-train inertial effects were estimated from highspeed tests with and without power-train. Speed effects averaged 2% per [m/s] for crush up to power-train impact, and post-crash measurements were a reasonable estimate of front-structure stiffness.
Technical Paper

Aeroacoustics of an Automobile A-Pillar Rain Gutter: Computational and Experimental Study

1999-03-01
1999-01-1128
Noise due to the flow over an automobile A-pillar rain gutter in isolation was computed using a two step procedure. Initially the flow solution was obtained by solving the Reynolds Averaged Navier Stokes (RANS) equations. Acoustical Sources were extracted from the flow solution and propagated to the far-field using the Lighthill-Curle equation. Experiments were conducted to evaluate the computations. Compared results include steady pressures, time dependent pressures, and sound intensity levels. Computed results and experimental data were reduced in a similar way to ensure a one to one comparison. Computed results are in good agreement with the experimental values. A-weighted noise levels are predicted reasonably well.
Technical Paper

An Integrated Chassis Control for Vehicle-Trailer Stability and Handling Performance

2004-05-04
2004-01-2046
To cope with the conflict requirements between the stability and handling performance, and the high-order and complex vehicle-trailer plant, a model tracking method is proposed. With this approach, a feedback control is designed to “decouple” the vehicle and the trailer plant, such that each tracks a well-defined second-order reference model independently yet coordinately. A feedforward control is designed to maintain its system steady-state performance. As a result, the proposed approach not only improves the system transient responses, but also its steady-state performance. This approach further yields a simple yet analytical control derivation that provides more insight to the system dynamics.
Technical Paper

An Investigation of Sample Bag Hydrocarbon Emissions and Carbon Dioxide Permeation Properties

2004-03-08
2004-01-0593
The equipment for collecting dilute exhaust samples involves the use of bag materials (i.e., Tedlar®) that emit hydrocarbons that contaminate samples. This study identifies a list of materials and treatments to produce bags that reduce contamination. Based on the average emission rates, baked Tedlar®, Capran® treated with alumina deposition, supercritical CO2 extracted Kynar® and supercritical CO2 extracted Teflon NXT are capable of achieving the target hydrocarbon emission rate of less than 15 ppbC per 30 minutes. CO2 permeation tests were also performed. Tedlar, Capran, Kynar and Teflon NXT showed comparable average permeation rates. Based on the criteria of HC emission performance, changes in measured CO2 concentration, ease of sealing, and ease of surface treatment, none of the four materials could be distinguished from one another.
Technical Paper

Progress Toward a Magnesium-Intensive Engine: The USAMP Magnesium Powertrain Cast Components Project

2004-03-08
2004-01-0654
The US Automotive Materials Partnership (USAMP) and the US Department of Energy launched the Magnesium Powertrain Cast Components Project in 2001 to determine the feasibility and desirability of producing a magnesium-intensive engine; a V6 engine with a magnesium block, bedplate, oil pan, and front cover. In 2003 the Project reached mid-point and accomplished a successful Decision Gate Review for entry into the second half (Phase II) of the Project. Three tasks, comprising Phase I were completed: (1) evaluation of the most promising low-cost, creep-resistant magnesium alloys, (2) design of the engine components using the properties of the optimized alloys and creation of cost model to assess the cost/benefit of the magnesium-intensive engine, and (3) identification and prioritization of scientific research areas deemed by the project team to be critical for the use of magnesium in powertrain applications.
Technical Paper

Computing Transfer Functions from Mass Loaded Response of Structures

2004-03-08
2004-01-0780
This paper outlines a method for computing the transfer functions of structures using their mass loaded responses. According to the method, scaled transfer functions are computed from the response of a structure and without any knowledge of the input forces. The paper outlines the analytical approach, develops the necessary equations for the computation of transfer functions between a mass loading point and other points on a linear dynamic system. A numerical example to show the validity, advantages and limitations of the method is also provided. Currently, the method can be applied to the responses obtained from analytical simulations where it may be necessary to compute coupled response of a simulated dynamic system with other dynamic systems that are not (or cannot be) included in a simulation. It is not uncommon that many dynamic simulations exclude certain coupling effects between the main and the auxiliary systems.
Technical Paper

Obtaining the Coupled Response of Structures from their Mass Loaded Forced Response

2004-03-08
2004-01-0759
This paper outlines a newly developed method for predicting the coupled response of structures from their uncoupled forced responses without having to know the forces acting on such structures. It involves computing the forced response of originally uncoupled structures with several mass loadings at a potential coupling point. The response data obtained from such computations is then used to predict the coupled response. The theory for discrete linear systems is outlined in the paper and a numerical example is given to demonstrate the validity, advantages and limitations of the method. The method is primarily devised to obtain coupled response of linear dynamic systems from independent and uncoupled analytical simulations. Its application significantly decreases computation time by reducing the simulation model size and is excellent for “what if” scenarios where a large number of simulations would otherwise be necessary.
Technical Paper

Significant Factors in Height of Force Measurements for Vehicle Collision Compatibility

2004-03-08
2004-01-1165
The concept of height of force has been suggested by some researchers as one possible parameter defining the structural interaction probability between vehicles of different sizes. This proposed parameter was defined as the vertical centroid of forces exerted on a flat barrier surface when a vehicle crashes into the barrier. It is therefore measured as a function of elapsed time since crash. In this paper, the height of force is obtained from theoretical calculations and also measured in crash tests at 56 km/h against barriers instrumented with an array of load cells. It is observed that the measured values of height of force have significant errors which are dependent on factors other than the crash conditions and the properties of the vehicle's structure and geometry. These factors need to be taken into account in future discussions of using the height of force or the average height of force as an indicator of vehicle compatibility.
Technical Paper

Mount Rate Robust Optimization for Idle Shake Performance

2004-03-08
2004-01-1536
Analytical study of vehicle idle shake performance is standard NVH work within the vehicle development process. Robust design for idle shake performance takes variations into account besides nominal design based performance evaluation. In other words, in addition to the nominal design, Robust Design includes additional evaluations that may incorporate variation due to manufacturing, usage or the environment. This paper presents an example of how to obtain a robust design through performing Robust Optimization on idle shake performance with respect to powertrain mount rates and their tolerance variation. The paper describes a two-phase process that has been systematically implemented to analytically obtain a robust design. In the first phase, performance variation assessment is conducted. Then a Robust Optimization is performed to obtain a robust design.
Technical Paper

e-Thermal: Automobile Air-Conditioning Module

2004-03-08
2004-01-1509
e-Thermal is a vehicle level thermal analysis tool developed by General Motors to simulate the transient performance of the entire vehicle HVAC and Powertrain cooling system. It is currently in widespread (global) use across GM. This paper discusses the details of the air-conditioning module of e-Thermal. Most of the literature available on transient modeling of the air conditioning systems is based on finite difference approach that require large simulation times. This has been overcome by appropriately modeling the components using Sinda/Fluint. The basic components of automotive air conditioning system, evaporator, condenser, compressor and expansion valve, are parametrically modeled in Sinda/Fluint. For each component, physical characteristics and performance data is collected in form of component data standards. This performance data is used to curve fit parameters that then reproduce the component performance.
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