Refine Your Search

Search Results

Viewing 1 to 5 of 5
Technical Paper

Axle Imbalance Measurement and Balancing Strategies

2007-05-15
2007-01-2238
This paper summarizes a study on axle balance measurement and balancing strategies. Seven types of axles were investigated. Test samples were randomly selected from products. Two significant development questions were set out to be answered: 1) What is the minimum rotational speed possible in order to yield measured imbalance readings which correlated to in-vehicle imbalance-related vibration. What is the relationship between the measured imbalance and rotational speed. To this end, the imbalance level of each axle was measured using a test rig with different speeds from 800 to 4000 rpm with 200 rpm increments. 2) Is it feasible to balance axle sub-assemblies only and still result in a full-assembly that satisfies the assembled axle specification? To this end, the sub-assemblies were balanced on a balance machine to a specified level. Then with these balanced sub-assemblies, the full assemblies were completed and audited on the same balance test rig in the same way.
Technical Paper

Experimental Determination of an Engine's Inertial Properties

2007-05-15
2007-01-2291
Determination of an engine's inertial properties is critical during vehicle dynamic analysis and the early stages of engine mounting system design. Traditionally, the inertia tensor can be determined by torsional pendulum method with a reasonable precision, while the center of gravity can be determined by placing it in a stable position on three scales with less accuracy. Other common experimental approaches include the use of frequency response functions. The difficulty of this method is to align the directions of the transducers mounted on various positions on the engine. In this paper, an experimental method to estimate an engine's inertia tensor and center of gravity is presented. The method utilizes the traditional torsional pendulum method, but with additional measurement data. With this method, the inertia tensor and center of gravity are estimated in a least squares sense.
Technical Paper

A New Method for Obtaining FRF of a Structure in Area Where Impact Hammer Cannot Reach

2007-05-15
2007-01-2385
The Frequency Response Function (FRF) is a fundamental component to identifying the dynamic characteristics of a system. FRF's have a significant impact on modal analysis and root cause analysis of NVH issues. In most cases the FRF can be easily measured, but there are instances when the measurement is unobtainable due to spatial constraints. This paper outlines a simple experimental method for obtaining a high quality input-output FRF of a structure in areas where an impact hammer can not reach during impact testing. Traditionally, the FRF in such an area is obtained by using a load cell extender with a hammer impact excitation. A common problem with this device is a double hit, that yields unacceptable results.
Technical Paper

Theoretical and Practical Aspects of Balancing a V-8 Engine Crankshaft

2005-05-16
2005-01-2454
Crankshafts must be balanced statically and dynamically before being put into service. However, without pistons and connecting-rod assemblies, a non-symmetric crankshaft is not in dynamic balance. Therefore, it is necessary to apply equivalent ring-weights on each of the crankpins of the crankshaft when balancing it on a dynamic balancing machine. The value of the ring weight must be accurately determined, otherwise all advantages that are derived from balancing would be of no avail. This paper analytically examines the theoretical background of this problem. Formulas for calculating the ring weights are derived and presented. These formulas are applicable to a generic class of crankshafts of V-type engines with piston pin offset. Also, practical consideration, such as the design and manufacturing of these ring weights, the method of testing, and correction is addressed.
Technical Paper

Measurement of Transfer Case Imbalance

2005-05-16
2005-01-2297
Different methodologies to test transfer case imbalance were investigated in this study. One method utilized traditional standard single plane and two plane methods to measure the imbalance of the transfer case when running it on a dynamic balance machine at steady RPM, while a second method utilized accelerometers and a laser vibrometer to measure vertical vibration on the transfer case when running it on a dynamic balance machine in 4 Hi open mode during a run up from 1000 to 4000 RPM with a 40 RPM difference between the input and output shaft speeds. A comparison of all of the measurements for repeatability and accuracy was done with the goal of determining an appropriate and efficient method that generates the most consistent results. By using the traditional method, the test results were not repeatable. This may be due to the internal complexity of transfer cases. With the second method, good correlation between the measurements was obtained.
X