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Technical Paper

Control Validation Project at GM for Hybrid Vehicle Air Conditioning

2006-04-03
2006-01-1446
Software development tools can be used in conjunction with test automation tools to validate controller software. Test automation tools must have an open architecture to interface with all the different software and hardware components, within a control validation project. Therefore software development tools like Matlab/Simulink will be able to exchange data via real time interface software with test automation tools. The test automation tool must be flexible to pass data back and forth from/to Microsoft standard software programs like Excel.
Technical Paper

Energy Management Strategies for Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles

2007-04-16
2007-01-0290
Plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) differ from hybrid vehicles (HEVs) with their ability to use off-board electricity generation to recharge their energy storage systems. In addition to possessing charge-sustaining HEV operation capability, PHEVs use the stored electrical energy during a charge-depleting operating period to displace a significant amount of petroleum consumption. The particular operating strategy employed during the charge-depleting mode will significantly influence the component attributes and the value of the PHEV technology. This paper summarizes three potential energy management strategies, and compares the implications of selecting one strategy over another in the context of the aggressiveness and distance of the duty cycle over which the vehicle will likely operate.
Technical Paper

Duty Cycle Characterization and Evaluation Towards Heavy Hybrid Vehicle Applications

2007-04-16
2007-01-0302
Four metrics related to vehicle duty cycle are derived from the energy equation of vehicle motion. Three key application areas are introduced. The first is the ability to quantify the sameness between vehicle duty cycles and the ability to asses a duty cycle's suitability for hybrid vehicle usage. The second area of application allows for the estimation of fuel consumption for a given vehicle over a target duty cycle. The third area of application allows us to predict how non-propulsion fuel use will affect energy use. The paper ends with real-world examples involving actual heavy-duty hybrids.
Technical Paper

Route-Based Control of Hybrid Electric Vehicles

2008-04-14
2008-01-1315
Today's hybrid electric vehicle (HEV) controls do not necessarily provide maximum fuel savings over all drive cycles. An approach that employs route-based control could improve HEV efficiency at potentially minimal additional cost. This paper evaluates a range of route-based control approaches and identifies look-ahead strategies (using input from “on-the-fly” route predictions) as an area meriting further analysis. A novel implementation approach is developed and discussed, and a comparison with simulation results using an optimized general control setting indicates that fuel savings of approximately 2% to 4% can be obtained with route-based control. Given the increasing prevalence of GPS systems in vehicles, this advance has the potential to provide considerable aggregate fuel savings if applied across the entire national fleet. For instance, a 3% across-the-board reduction in HEV fuel use would save nearly 6.5 million gallons of fuel annually in the United States.
Technical Paper

Co-Simulation of Electrical and Propulsion Systems

2001-08-20
2001-01-2533
One of the challenges of analyzing vehicular electrical systems is the co-dependence of the electrical system and the propulsion system. Even in traditional vehicles where the electrical power budget is very low, the electrical system analysis for macro power utilization over a drive cycle requires knowledge of the generator shaft rpm profile during the drive cycle. This co-dependence increases as the electrical power budget increases, and the integration of the two systems becomes complete when hybridization is chosen. Last year at this conference, the authors presented a paper entitled “Dual Voltage Electrical System Simulations.” That paper established validation for a suite of electrical component models and demonstrated the ability to predict system performance both on a macro power flow (entire drive cycle) level and a detailed transient-event level. The techniques were applicable to 12V, 42V, dual voltage, and/or elevated voltage systems.
Technical Paper

Methodology for Calculating Cost-per-Mile for Current and Future Vehicle Powertrain Technologies, with Projections to 2024

2011-04-12
2011-01-1345
Currently, several cost-per-mile calculators exist that can provide estimates of acquisition and operating costs for consumers and fleets. However, these calculators are limited in their ability to determine the difference in cost per mile for consumer versus fleet ownership, to calculate the costs beyond one ownership period, to show the sensitivity of the cost per mile to the annual vehicle miles traveled (VMT), and to estimate future increases in operating and ownership costs. Oftentimes, these tools apply a constant percentage increase over the time period of vehicle operation, or in some cases, no increase in direct costs at all over time. A more accurate cost-per-mile calculator has been developed that allows the user to analyze these costs for both consumers and fleets. Operating costs included in the calculation tool include fuel, maintenance, tires, and repairs; ownership costs include insurance, registration, taxes and fees, depreciation, financing, and tax credits.
Technical Paper

Full Vehicle Simulation for Series Hybrid Vehicles

2003-06-23
2003-01-2301
Delphi and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) collaborated to develop a simulation code to model the mechanical and electrical architectures of a series hybrid vehicle simultaneously. This co-simulation code is part of the larger ADVISOR® product created by NREL and diverse partners. Simulation of the macro power flow in a series hybrid vehicle requires both the mechanical drivetrain and the entire electrical architecture. It is desirable to solve the electrical network equations in an environment designed to comprehend such a network and solve the equations in terms of current and voltage. The electrical architecture for the series hybrid vehicle has been modeled in Saber™ to achieve these goals. This electrical architecture includes not only the high-voltage battery, generator, and traction motor, but also the normal low-voltage bus (14V) with loads common to all vehicles.
Technical Paper

Accounting for the Variation of Driver Aggression in the Simulation of Conventional and Advanced Vehicles

2013-04-08
2013-01-1453
Hybrid electric vehicles, plug-in hybrid electric vehicles, and battery electric vehicles offer the potential to reduce both oil imports and greenhouse gases, as well as to offer a financial benefit to the driver. However, assessing these potential benefits is complicated by several factors, including the driving habits of the operator. We focus on driver aggression, i.e., the level of acceleration and velocity characteristic of travel, to (1) assess its variation within large, real-world drive datasets, (2) quantify its effect on both vehicle efficiency and economics for multiple vehicle types, (3) compare these results to those of standard drive cycles commonly used in the industry, and (4) create a representative drive cycle for future analyses where standard drive cycles are lacking.
Technical Paper

Measured Laboratory and In-Use Fuel Economy Observed over Targeted Drive Cycles for Comparable Hybrid and Conventional Package Delivery Vehicles

2012-09-24
2012-01-2049
This research project compares the in-use and laboratory-derived fuel economy of a medium-duty hybrid electric drivetrain with “engine off at idle” capability to a conventional drivetrain in a typical commercial package delivery application. Vehicles in this study included eleven model year 2010 Freightliner P100H hybrids that were placed in service at a United Parcel Service (UPS) facility in Minneapolis, Minn., during the first half of 2010. These hybrid vehicles were evaluated for 18 months against eleven model year 2010 Freightliner P100D diesels that were placed in service at the same facility a couple months after the hybrids. Both vehicle study groups use the same model year 2009 Cummins ISB 200 HP engine. The vehicles of interest were chosen by comparing the average daily mileage of the hybrid group to that of a similar size and usage diesel group.
Technical Paper

HEV Control Strategy for Real-Time Optimization of Fuel Economy and Emissions

2000-04-02
2000-01-1543
Hybrid electric vehicles (HEV's) offer additional flexibility to enhance the fuel economy and emissions of vehicles. The Real-Time Control Strategy (RTCS) presented here optimizes efficiency and emissions of a parallel configuration HEV. In order to determine the ideal operating point of the vehicle's engine and motor, the control strategy considers all possible engine-motor torque pairs. For a given operating point, the strategy predicts the possible energy consumption and the emissions emitted by the vehicle. The strategy calculates the “replacement energy” that would restore the battery's state of charge (SOC) to its initial level. This replacement energy accounts for inefficiencies in the energy storage system conversion process. User- and standards-based weightings of time-averaged fuel economy and emissions performance determine an overall impact function. The strategy continuously selects the operating point that is the minimum of this cost function.
Technical Paper

Modeling and Validation of a Fuel Cell Hybrid Vehicle

2000-04-02
2000-01-1566
This paper describes the design and construction of a fuel cell hybrid electric vehicle based on the conversion of a five passenger production sedan. The vehicle uses a relatively small fuel cell stack to provide average power demands, and a battery pack to provide peak power demands for varied driving conditions. A model of this vehicle was developed using ADVISOR, an Advanced Vehicle Simulator that tracks energy flow and fuel usage within the vehicle drivetrain and energy conversion components. The Virginia Tech Fuel Cell Hybrid Electric Vehicle was tested on the EPA City and Highway driving cycles to provide data for validation of the model. Vehicle data and model results show good correlation at all levels and show that ADVISOR has the capability to model fuel cell hybrid electric vehicles.
Technical Paper

Un-Controlled Generation Modelling and Analysis for Hybrid Vehicles

2017-01-10
2017-26-0108
Interior permanent magnet machines are being widely used in hybrid vehicles owing to their compact size and high power density. Vehicle level application requires the motor to operate at high speed beyond the base speed of the motor. This is accomplished through flux weakening control. Nonfunctioning of inverter switches and/or gate driver circuit during flux weakening could give rise to a potential fault scenario called Un-Controlled Generation (UCG). This paper gives a detailed background of UCG and its impact on the high voltage and propulsion systems. In further sections the details related to modelling and analysis of UCG will be discussed. Finally, the paper will conclude with simulation results and comparison of the results with motor dynamometer test data.
Technical Paper

Modeling Heavy/Medium-Duty Fuel Consumption Based on Drive Cycle Properties

2015-09-29
2015-01-2812
This paper presents multiple methods for predicting heavy/medium-duty vehicle fuel consumption based on driving cycle information. A polynomial model, a black box artificial neural net model, a polynomial neural network model, and a multivariate adaptive regression splines (MARS) model were developed and verified using data collected from chassis testing performed on a parcel delivery diesel truck operating over the Heavy Heavy-Duty Diesel Truck (HHDDT), City Suburban Heavy Vehicle Cycle (CSHVC), New York Composite Cycle (NYCC), and hydraulic hybrid vehicle (HHV) drive cycles. Each model was trained using one of four drive cycles as a training cycle and the other three as testing cycles. By comparing the training and testing results, a representative training cycle was chosen and used to further tune each method.
Technical Paper

Retail Infrastructure Costs Comparison for Hydrogen and Electricity for Light-Duty Vehicles

2014-04-01
2014-01-1969
Both hydrogen and plug-in electric vehicles offer significant social and environmental benefits to enhance energy security and reduce criteria and greenhouse gas emissions from the transportation sector. However, the rollout of electric vehicle supply equipment (EVSE) and hydrogen retail stations (HRS) requires substantial investments with high risks due to many uncertainties. We compare retail infrastructure costs on a common basis - cost per mile, assuming fueling service to 10% of all light-duty vehicles in a typical 1.5 million person city in 2025. Our analysis considers three HRS sizes, four distinct types of EVSE and two distinct EVSE scenarios. EVSE station costs, including equipment and installation, are assumed to be 15% less than today's costs. We find that levelized retail capital costs per mile are essentially indistinguishable given the uncertainty and variability around input assumptions.
Journal Article

In-Use and Vehicle Dynamometer Evaluation and Comparison of Class 7 Hybrid Electric and Conventional Diesel Delivery Trucks

2013-09-24
2013-01-2468
This study compared fuel economy and emissions between heavy-duty hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) and equivalent conventional diesel vehicles. In-use field data were collected from daily fleet operations carried out at a FedEx facility in California on six HEV and six conventional 2010 Freightliner M2-106 straight box trucks. Field data collection primarily focused on route assessment and vehicle fuel consumption over a six-month period. Chassis dynamometer testing was also carried out on one conventional vehicle and one HEV to determine differences in fuel consumption and emissions. Route data from the field study was analyzed to determine the selection of dynamometer test cycles. From this analysis, the New York Composite (NYComp), Hybrid Truck Users Forum Class 6 (HTUF 6), and California Air Resource Board (CARB) Heavy Heavy-Duty Diesel Truck (HHDDT) drive cycles were chosen.
Journal Article

Hydraulic Hybrid and Conventional Parcel Delivery Vehicles' Measured Laboratory Fuel Economy on Targeted Drive Cycles

2014-09-30
2014-01-2375
This research project compares laboratory-measured fuel economy of a medium-duty diesel powered hydraulic hybrid vehicle drivetrain to both a conventional diesel drivetrain and a conventional gasoline drivetrain in a typical commercial parcel delivery application. Vehicles in this study included a model year 2012 Freightliner P10HH hybrid compared to a 2012 conventional gasoline P100 and a 2012 conventional diesel parcel delivery van of similar specifications. Drive cycle analysis of 484 days of hybrid parcel delivery van commercial operation from multiple vehicles was used to select three standard laboratory drive cycles as well as to create a custom representative cycle. These four cycles encompass and bracket the range of real world in-use data observed in Baltimore United Parcel Service operations.
Journal Article

Vehicle-Level EMC Modeling for HEV/EV Applications

2015-04-14
2015-01-0194
Electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) is becoming more important in power converters and motor drives as seen in hybrid electric vehicles (HEV) to achieve higher reliability of the vehicle and its components. Electromagnetic interference (EMI) of the electronic components for a vehicle are evaluated and validated at a component-level test bench; however, it is sometimes observed that the EMI level of the components can be changed in a vehicle-level test due to differences in the vehicle's configuration (cable routing, connecting location etc.). In this presentation, a vehicle-level EMC simulation methodology is introduced to estimate radiated emissions from a vehicle. The comparison between the simulation and measurement results is also presented and discussed.
Technical Paper

Cold-Start and Warmup Driveability Performance of Hybrid Electric Vehicles Using Oxygenated Fuels

2003-10-27
2003-01-3196
Hybrid vehicles may respond to fuel variables in unique ways; they could even require a unique driveability test. The Coordinating Research Council (CRC) conducted a program to determine the effect of ethanol content on driveability performance under cool ambient conditions. In addition to the 27 vehicles in the main fleet, four hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) were tested using the same fuels and driveability procedure. These HEVs responded to fuel in a manner similar to conventional vehicles; however, the HEVs showed unique driving characteristics not well captured in the existing test.
Technical Paper

FASTSim: A Model to Estimate Vehicle Efficiency, Cost and Performance

2015-04-14
2015-01-0973
The Future Automotive Systems Technology Simulator (FASTSim) is a high-level advanced vehicle powertrain systems analysis tool supported by the U.S. Department of Energy's Vehicle Technologies Office. FASTSim provides a quick and simple approach to compare powertrains and estimate the impact of technology improvements on light- and heavy-duty vehicle efficiency, performance, cost, and battery life. The input data for most light-duty vehicles can be automatically imported. Those inputs can be modified to represent variations of the vehicle or powertrain. The vehicle and its components are then simulated through speed-versus-time drive cycles. At each time step, FASTSim accounts for drag, acceleration, ascent, rolling resistance, each powertrain component's efficiency and power limits, and regenerative braking. Conventional vehicles, hybrid electric vehicles, plug-in hybrid electric vehicles, all-electric vehicles, compressed natural gas vehicles, and fuel cell vehicles are included.
Journal Article

Climate Control Load Reduction Strategies for Electric Drive Vehicles in Cold Weather

2016-04-05
2016-01-0262
When operated, the cabin climate control system is the largest auxiliary load on a vehicle. This load has significant impact on fuel economy for conventional and hybrid vehicles, and it drastically reduces the driving range of all-electric vehicles (EVs). Heating is even more detrimental to EV range than cooling because no engine waste heat is available. Reducing the thermal loads on the vehicle climate control system will extend driving range and increase the market penetration of EVs. Researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory have evaluated strategies for vehicle climate control load reduction with special attention toward grid-connected electric vehicles. Outdoor vehicle thermal testing and computational modeling were used to assess potential strategies for improved thermal management and to evaluate the effectiveness of thermal load reduction technologies. A human physiology model was also used to evaluate the impact on occupant thermal comfort.
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