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Journal Article

Development of Integrated Modular Motor Drive for Traction Applications

2011-04-12
2011-01-0344
This paper introduces a promising approach for developing an integrated traction motor drive based on the Integrated Modular Motor Drive (IMMD) concept. The IMMD concept strives to meet aggressive power density and performance targets by modularizing both the machine and power electronics and then integrating them into a single combined machine-plus-drive structure. Physical integration of the power electronics inside the machine makes it highly desirable to increase the power electronics operating temperature including higher power semiconductor junction temperatures and improved device packaging. Recent progress towards implementing the IMMD concept in an integrated traction motor drive is summarized in this paper. Several candidate permanent magnet (PM) machine configurations with different numbers of phases between 3 and 6 are analyzed to compare their performance characteristics and key application features.
Technical Paper

Thermo-Mechanical Modeling of Friction Stir Spot Welding (FSSW)

2006-04-03
2006-01-1392
This paper presents on-going finite element modeling efforts of friction stir spot welding (FSSW) process using Abaqus/Explicit as a finite element solver. Three-dimensional coupled thermal-stress model was used to calculate thermo-mechanical response of FSSW process. Adaptive meshing and advection schemes, which makes it possible to maintain mesh quality under large deformations, is utilized to simulate the material flow and temperature distribution in FSSW process. The predicted overall deformation shape of the weld joint resembles that experimentally observed. Temperature and stress graphs in the radial direction as well as temperature-deformation distribution plots are presented.
Technical Paper

Non-Thermal Plasma Exhaust Aftertreatment: A Fast Rise-Time Concept

1997-05-01
971718
Increases in efficiency may be possible by a new technique for non-thermal plasma aftertreatment of exhaust gases. The new technique involves very short risetimes (40ps) high frequency (5Ghz) high power bursts of low duty factor microwaves to generate a dielectric barrier discharge. The technique is illustrated in the simplified example of the dissociation of NO in N2. Electric field distributions and enhancing improvements are briefly described for a number of configurations. The technique is meant to be used in conjunction with material catalyst and can, for a class of catalysts, cause a significant reactivity on the catalyst surface.
Technical Paper

Heavy Vehicle Propulsion Materials Program

1999-04-28
1999-01-2254
The objective of the Heavy Vehicle Propulsion Materials Program is to develop the enabling materials technology for the clean, high-efficiency diesel truck engines of the future. The development of cleaner, higher-efficiency diesel engines imposes greater mechanical, thermal, and tribological demands on materials of construction. Often the enabling technology for a new engine component is the material from which the part can be made. The Heavy Vehicle Propulsion Materials Program is a partnership between the Department of Energy (DOE), and the diesel engine companies in the United States, materials suppliers, national laboratories, and universities. A comprehensive research and development program has been developed to meet the enabling materials requirements for the diesel engines of the future.
Technical Paper

Axial NO2 Utilization Measurements within a Partial Flow Filter during Passive Regeneration

2017-03-28
2017-01-0988
Measuring axial exhaust species concentration distributions within a wall-flow aftertreatment device provides unique and significant insights regarding the performance of complex devices like the SCR-on-filter. In this particular study, a less complex aftertreatment configuration which includes a DOC followed by two uncoated partial flow filters (PFF) was used to demonstrate the potential and challenges. The PFF design in this study was a particulate filter with alternating open and plugged channels. A SpaciMS [1] instrument was used to measure the axial NO2 profiles within adjacent open and plugged channels of each filter element during an extended passive regeneration event using a full-scale engine and catalyst system. By estimating the mass flow through the open and plugged channels, the axial soot load profile history could be assessed.
Technical Paper

Power Electronics and Electric Machinery Innovations - U.S. GovernmentS Role in Pngv

2000-11-01
2000-01-C063
The U.S. Government plays an important role in the Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles' (PNGV) electrical and electronics technologies with a program consisting of high-risk research and development (R&D) projects. The Department of Energy (DOE) plays the largest role in supporting these technologies to specifically address automotive needs. DOE has three Automotive Integrated Power Module (AIPM) contractors and two Automotive Electric Motor Drive (AEMD) contractors working to become viable suppliers for PNGV. Materials development projects are working to improve materials and devices needed in automotive motors and drives, such as permanent magnets, capacitors, sensors, connectors, and thermal management materials. Advancements in inverters, controls, and motors and generators conducted at DOE's national laboratories are also presented.
Technical Paper

Residual Stress Analysis for Additive Manufactured Large Automobile Parts by Using Neutron and Simulation

2020-04-14
2020-01-1071
Metal additive manufacturing has high potential to produce automobile parts, due to its shape flexibility and unique material properties. On the other hand, residual stress which is generated by rapid solidification causes deformation, cracks and failure under building process. To avoid these problems, understanding of internal residual stress distribution is necessary. However, from the view point of measureable area, conventional residual stress measurement methods such as strain gages and X-ray diffractometers, is limited to only the surface layer of the parts. Therefore, neutron which has a high penetration capability was chosen as a probe to measure internal residual stress in this research. By using time of flight neutron diffraction facility VULCAN at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, residual stress for mono-cylinder head, which were made of aluminum alloy, was measured non-distractively. From the result of precise measurement, interior stress distribution was visualized.
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