Refine Your Search

Search Results

Viewing 1 to 8 of 8
Journal Article

PSI5 in Powertrain

2012-04-16
2012-01-0938
Among the currently available sensor interfaces for automotive applications, only the PSI5 interface - as standardized in the new 2001 PSI5 V2.0 - meets the rising system requirements, the increased requirements of the new environmental regulations, and the requirements of current functional safety standards. PSI5 not only features the capability to transmit highly accurate sensor data, high EMC robustness, bus capability, and bidirectional communication, but also offers savings in the cable harness and a reduced number of connector pins by using just two wires. It therefore offers enhanced technical functionality at a reasonable cost. To improve the environmental friendliness and sustainable operation of drive concepts, Bosch is also employing sophisticated and cross-linked sensors, actuators and control units. In addition, there is also the need to optimize system functions, weight, construction space and costs.
Technical Paper

AUTOSAR Gets on the Road - More and More

2012-04-16
2012-01-0014
AUTOSAR (AUTomotive Open System ARchitecture) is a worldwide standard for automotive basic software in line with an architecture that eases exchange and transfer of application software components between platforms or companies. AUTOSAR provides the standardized architecture together with the specifications of the basics software along with the methodology for developing embedded control units for automotive applications. AUTOSAR matured over the last several years through intensive development, implementation and maintenance. Two main releases (R3.2 and R4.0) represent its current degree of maturity. AUTOSAR is driven by so called core partners: leading car manufacturers (BMW, Daimler, Ford, GM, PSA, Toyota, Volkswagen) together with the tier 1 suppliers Continental and Bosch. AUTOSAR in total has more than 150 companies (OEM, Tier X suppliers, SW and tool suppliers, and silicon suppliers) as members from all over the world.
Technical Paper

Improved Occupant Protection through Cooperation of Active and Passive Safety Systems – Combined Active and Passive Safety CAPS

2006-04-03
2006-01-1144
One of the most important aims of the automotive industry is to provide the best possible protection for drivers, passengers and pedestrians. Through their CAPS (Combined Active and Passive Safety) program (see Figure 1), Bosch is developing new functions which help to achieve these goals and contribute to accident mitigation and/or reduction of accident severity. By linking existing active and passive automobile safety systems and extending these by adding systems for monitoring and evaluating the vehicle's environment, the foundation for new safety functions is created. The growing number of airbags in vehicles provides more and better protection against injury for the occupants. In addition, active safety systems such as the ESP® Electronic Stability Program help to prevent an accident occurring in the first place. If these systems are linked together, they can share information and provide even better safety for drivers and passengers through new functions.
Technical Paper

More Safety with Vehicle Stability Control

2007-11-28
2007-01-2759
Since introduction of safety belts in the 70s and airbags in the early 80s, these passive safety technologies have become standard in many markets. Remarkable improvement in passive safety, efforts to alter driver behaviour and infrastructural programmes have led to substantial reductions of fatalities in many regions, although the absolute number of highway fatalities increased e.g. in the USA in 2002 to the highest level since 1990. Electronic Stability Control (ESC) as an active safety technology assists the driver to keep the vehicle on the intended track and thereby actively prevents accidents. In 1995 Bosch was the first supplier to introduce ESC for the Mercedes-Benz S-Class, where it is marketed as ESP® - Electronic Stability Program. Since then, Bosch has produced more than 30 million systems worldwide. Many studies have now confirmed that ESC can prevent a vehicle from skidding or rolling over in nearly all driving situations.
Technical Paper

System Architecture and Algorithm for Advanced Passive Safety by Integration of Surround Sensing Information

2005-04-11
2005-01-1233
Surround sensing methods provide information which can be used in PRECRASH functionalities for advanced control of the passenger protection system. The relevant data (closing velocity (cv), time to impact (tti), and offset of contact point (Δy)) are determined with a Predictive Safety System and transmitted to the airbag control unit for further processing in the PRECRASH algorithm. The PRECRASH algorithm controls both, the activation of reversible restraints and the deployment of irreversible restraints. Therefore it consists of two components: The PREFIRE and the PRESET algorithm. The PREFIRE algorithm uses the PRECRASH information for the activation of the reversible belt pretensioner in advance of a crash to reduce chest load in the crash phase. The PRESET algorithm calculates the trigger decision for deployment of pyrotechnical restraints. Inputs of the PRESET algorithm are the PRECRASH information as well as the acceleration signal.
Technical Paper

Bus System for Wiring Actuators of Restraint Systems

1997-02-24
971053
The continuing increase in the performance of restraint systems has led to a drastic increase in the number of actuator devices. The individual wiring of the igniters becomes more and more problematic through the accompanied large number of plug connections and cables. Along with demands for weight and volume reduction, there are requirements for EMI and short circuit protection to eliminate erroneous deployment and misuse. As a solution, a new multi-protocol dual wire bus system is described that has the capability to supply energy and address multiple peripheral output stages to simultaneously fire any combination of actuators.
Technical Paper

The Computation of Airbag Deployment Times with the Help of Precrash Information

2002-03-04
2002-01-0192
Modern airbag control units are required to compute airbag deployment times with a high degree of precision. Therefore, the crash situation has to be recognized unambiguously, i.e. the goal is to obtain precise information about the relative speed, the barrier and the position of impact. One way of achieving this aim is via the implementation of a precrash sensing system using radar sensors. With these sensors, the relative closing velocity and the time-to-impact can be measured, thereby enabling a precise analysis of the crash situation. In this paper the algorithm for the computation of the airbag deployment decision will be presented.
Technical Paper

Acceleration Sensor in Surface Micromachining for Airbag Applications with High Signal/Noise Ratio

1996-02-01
960758
Employing novel surface micromachining techniques, a highly miniaturized, robust device has been fabricated. The accelerometer fulfills all requirements of state-of-the-art airbag systems. The present paper reports on the manufacturing and assembly process as well as the performance of the sensor. The capacitive sensing element consists of a moveable proof mass of polysilicon on a single crystalline silicon substrate. A lateral acceleration displaces the proof mass and a capacitive signal is generated at a comb electrode configuration. An external IC circuit provides the signal evaluation and conditioning in a closed loop mode, resulting in low temperature dependency of sensor characteristics and a wide frequency response. The sensor is fabricated by standard IC processing steps combined with additional surface micromachining techniques. A special deposition process in an epitaxial reactor allows the fabrication of moveable masses of more than 10 µm thickness.
X