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Technical Paper

Serial WireRing - High-Speed Interchip Interface

2012-04-16
2012-01-0198
A new high-performance interchip interface, called Serial WireRing, is introduced. It combines technically mature and established methods, whereby Serial WireRing provides a simple, robust and very inexpensive solution to replace the Serial Peripheral Interface (SPI). Serial WireRing uses a daisy chain ring topology, realized by unidirectional point-to-point connections from device to device. Serial WireRing is realized by a simple “wire ring” with CMOS, LVDS, optical or any other suitable signaling, even mixed. Therefore it has a very low pin count. In order to minimize the latency each slave transmits the data that it receives with 1 bit delay only. In order to avoid clock/data skew, the serial data and clock are merged into one bitstream. A corresponding clock is extracted at each receiver by a clock and data recovery circuit, driven by a simple internal oscillator.
Technical Paper

Impact of Bit Representation on Transport Capacity and Clock Accuracy in Serial Data Streams

1989-02-01
890532
All networking systems proposed for the automobile are serial in nature. Most of these systems are also multimaster. A requirement common to all of these systems is the ability to separate framing information from data. This is achieved by some form of code violation for the framing bits which violates the code form for standard data bits. In the Manchester and PWM bit representations this code violation can be signalled within a single bit, NRZ requires more bits. The concept of code violation is also used for signalling errors within a message frame. Clock tolerance is dependent on the length of time over which synchronisation between the serial bit stream and receiving circuitry must be maintained. With a given physical bus line bandwidth, the transport capacity of a protocol is a function of the number of time slots needed to transfer a given number of data bytes.
Technical Paper

J2716 SENT - Single Edge Nibble Transmission, Updates and Status

2011-04-12
2011-01-1034
The SAE J2716 SENT (Single Edge Nibble Transmission) Protocol has entered production with a number of announced products. The SENT protocol is a point-to-point scheme for transmitting signal values from a sensor to a controller. It is intended to allow for high resolution data transmission with a lower system cost than available serial data solution. The SAE SENT Task Force has developed a number of enhancements and clarifications to the original specification which are summarized in this paper.
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