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Technical Paper

The Challenge of Precise Characterizing the Specific Large-Span Flows in Urea Dosing Systems for NOx Reduction

2008-04-14
2008-01-1028
The reduction of nitrous oxides in the exhaust gases of internal combustion engines using a urea water solution is gaining more and more importance. While maintaining the future exhaust gas emission regulations, like the Euro 6 for passenger cars and the Euro 5 for commercial vehicles, urea dosing allows the engine management to be modified to improve fuel economy as well. The system manufacturer Robert Bosch has started early to develop the necessary dosing systems for the urea water solution. More than 300.000 Units have been delivered in 2007 for heavy duty applications. Typical dosing quantities for those systems are in the range of 0.01 l/h for passenger car systems and up to 10 l/h for commercial vehicles. During the first years of development and application of urea dosing systems, instantaneous flow measuring devices were used, which were not operating fully satisfactory.
Journal Article

Diesel Lubricity Requirements of Future Fuel Injection Equipment

2009-04-20
2009-01-0848
This paper looks at the underlying fundamentals of diesel fuel system lubrication for the highly-loaded contacts found in fuel injection equipment like high-pressure pumps. These types of contacts are already occurring in modern systems and their severity is likely to increase in future applications due to the requirement for increased fuel pressure. The aim of the work was to characterise the tribological behavior of these contacts when lubricated with diesel fuel and diesel fuel treated with lubricity additives and model nitrogen and sulphur compounds of different chemical composition. It is essential to understand the role of diesel fuel and of lubricity additives to ensure that future, more severely-loaded systems, will be free of any wear problem in the field.
Technical Paper

A New Approach to Assess the Accuracy of Service Timing Devices for Injection Pumps of Diesel Engines

1999-03-01
1999-01-0823
The correct timing of the diesel injection pump on engine is of major importance for all functions of the engine and for its exhaust emissions, during production pass off as well as in the field. Within the diesel service workshops a variety of devices exist to test the timing of the injection pump on engine. Most of them operate by clamp-on transducer being fitted to the injection pipe. A large uncertainty exists concerning the accuracy of such timing systems. Most diesel engine manufacturers do not have confidence in the timing devices capability and, therefore, do not recommend their usage. A working group within the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) adopted a method for the validation of these measurement systems, which usually is used to judge the capability of measurement gauges for industrial production processes.
Technical Paper

High-Pressure Injection Pumps with Electronic Control for Heavy-Duty Diesel Engines

1985-02-01
850170
Within the Robert Bosch Diesel Injection Pump Program, the MW and P pumps have a fundamental significance concerning medium-duty and heavy- duty engines. These engines have developed considerably in the last years with regard to combustion efficiency and emission reduction. In order to reach these new targets, specific developments of the pump were necessary to realize injection pressure of 900 bar and 1200 bar for the MW and P pumps, respectively. A further development emphasis of the past years was the development of a robust electronic governor concept to take advantage of this new technology. The topics of the paper are: Further development of the pump drivetrain and housing to cope with the difficulties inherent in producing 1000 bar. Development of constant-pressure valves. Preparation of the electronic governor concept for commercial vehicles. Development results of the electro-magnetic and electro-hydraulic actuators.
Technical Paper

Fuel Injection Equipment for Heavy Duty Diesel Engines for U. S. 1991/1994 Emission Limits

1989-02-01
890851
The particulate emissions can be reduced by increasing injection pressure. The NOx-emission can be lowered to the required amount with a retarded injection-begin. These measures raise fuel consumption by approximately 8-10 %. To avoid blue smoke from the cold engine, it is advantageous that the fuel injection is advanced during the warm-up period. These statements apply for injection systems with unit injectors as well as for pump-line-nozzle-systems. In this paper, the pump-line-nozzle-system will be described. With this system, injection pressures of 1200 to 1400 bar at the injection nozzle are reached. The injection-begin can be changed with a control-sleeve in-line pump. The injection-begin and fuel quantity can be flexibly and accurately adjusted by means of an electronic governor.
Technical Paper

Solenoid-Valve Controlled Diesel Distributor Injection Pump

1993-03-01
930327
The electronically-governed diesel distributor injection pump, with the proven sleeve control of injection quantity, has been in production at Bosch since 1987. Long-term development resulted in a solenoid-valve controlled injection pump. The function and component assemblies, consisting of the injection pump, solenoid valve and control unit, provide an even more flexible injection system. Of particular advantage with this type of system are the high dynamics of the fuel quantity, matching of each individual injection and the exact pump-specific fuel quantity compensation at numerous map points. Further advantages are the selection of timing and fuel injection rate independent of each other, as well as the ability to provide the correct timing even at cranking speeds. The entire system, with emphasis on the injection pump and the solenoid valve, are described for IDI engines in this paper.
Technical Paper

The Robert Bosch In-Line Pump for Diesel Engines, Type MW, Design, Application and Further Development

1979-02-01
790901
The range of Robert Bosch in-line pumps is designed for engines with cylinder outputs of up to 200 kW. Within this family of pumps the MW pump is used in small IDI engines and medium-sized DI engines with cylinder outputs in the region of 30 kW. More stringent exhaust emission legislation and the need to ensure optimum fuel economy call for efficient fuel-injection systems for diesel engines. In both of its designs the new MW pump meets these more exacting requirements and forms the contribution of Robert Bosch GmbH toward developing advanced diesel engines.
Technical Paper

Electronically Controlled High Pressure Unit Injector System for Diesel Engines

1991-09-01
911819
To achieve the future emissions regulations with low particulate and Nox levels, both the engine combustion system and the fuel injection equipment will have to be improved. For the fuel injection equipment, high injection pressure and variable injection timing as a function of engine speed, load, and temperature are of great importance. BOSCH is developing two different solutions: electronically controlled unit injector and single cylinder pump systems, high-pressure inline pumps with control sleeve and electronic control. This paper describes: the unit injector and its high-pressure solenoid valve the requirements for the mounting of the unit injector in the engine the low-pressure system the electronic control unit and the metering strategy
Technical Paper

Investigation on Fluid Mechanics of the Regenerative Pump Used in Gasoline Injection Systems

1995-02-01
950077
In order to optimize the inner flow of the regenerative pump used in gasoline injection systems, we carry out experimental and numerical flow investigations. A qualitative analysis of spatial flow phenomena in selected regions of the pump is presented by employing the laser light sheet technique. Therefore, a tenfold enlarged water model is built up, where dynamic similarity with the original flow is achieved. The results of the flow analysis have led to improved geometries which are compared with the original design by measured pump characteristic curves. Furthermore, three-dimensional simulations of the fully developed turbulent flow using a finite-element method are presented. The flow with respect to the rotating impeller is calculated by solving the Reynolds equations in connection with the k-ε-turbulence model.
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