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Video

SCR Deactivation Kinetics for Model-Based Control and Accelerated Aging Applications

2012-06-18
Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) catalysts are used to reduce NOx emissions from internal combustion engines in a variety of applications [1,2,3,4]. Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) performed an Internal Research & Development project to study SCR catalyst thermal deactivation. The study included a V/W/TiO2 formulation, a Cu-zeolite formulation and a Fe-zeolite formulation. This work describes NH3 storage capacity measurement data as a function of aging time and temperature. Addressing one objective of the work, these data can be used in model-based control algorithms to calculate the current NH3 storage capacity of an SCR catalyst operating in the field, based on time and temperature history. The model-based control then uses the calculated value for effective DEF control and prevention of excessive NH3 slip. Addressing a second objective of the work, accelerated thermal aging of SCR catalysts may be achieved by elevating temperatures above normal operating temperatures.
Video

SCR Deactivation Study for OBD Applications

2012-06-18
Selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalysts will be used to reduce oxides of nitrogen (NOx) emissions from internal combustion engines in a number of applications [1,2,3,4]. Southwest Research Institute® (SwRI)® performed an Internal Research & Development project to study SCR catalyst thermal deactivation. The study included a V/W/TiO2 formulation, a Cu-zeolite formulation and an Fe-zeolite formulation. This work describes NOx timed response to ammonia (NH3) transients as a function of thermal aging time and temperature. It has been proposed that the response time of NOx emissions to NH3 transients, effected by changes in diesel emissions fluid (DEF) injection rate, could be used as an on-board diagnostic (OBD) metric. The objective of this study was to evaluate the feasibility and practicality of this OBD approach.
Video

Brief Investigation of SCR High Temperature N2O Production

2012-06-18
Nitrous Oxide (N2O) is a greenhouse gas with a Global Warming Potential (GWP) of 298-310 [1,2] (298-310 times more potent than carbon dioxide (CO2)). As a result, any aftertreatment system that generates N2O must be well understood to be used effectively. Under low temperature conditions, N2O can be produced by Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) catalysts. The chemistry is reasonably well understood with N2O formed by the thermal decomposition of ammonium nitrate [3]. Ammonium nitrate and N2O form in oxides of nitrogen (NOx) gas mixtures that are high in nitrogen dioxide (NO2)[4]. This mechanism occurs at a relatively low temperature of about 200°C, and can be controlled by maintaining the nitric oxide (NO)/NO2 ratio above 1. However, N2O has also been observed at relatively high temperatures, in the region of 500°C.
Video

Evaluation of a NOx Transient Response Method for OBD of SCR Catalysts

2012-01-30
OBD requirements for aftertreatment system components require monitoring of the individual system components. One such component can be an NH3-SCR catalyst for NOx reduction. An OBD method that has been suggested is to generate positive or negative spikes in the inlet NH3 concentration, and monitor the outlet NOx transient response. A slow response indicates that the catalyst is maintaining its NH3 storage capacity, and therefore it is probably not degraded. A fast response indicates the catalyst has lost NH3 storage capacity, and may be degraded. The purpose of the work performed at Southwest Research Institute was to assess this approach for feasibility, effectiveness and practicality. The presentation will describe the work performed, results obtained, and implications for applying this method in test laboratory and real-world situations. Presenter Gordon J. Bartley, Southwest Research Institute
Video

Overview of Southwest Research Institute Activities in Engine Technology R&D

2012-05-10
The worldwide drive to improved energy efficiency for engine systems is being supported by several engine R&D programs at Southwest Research Institute (SwRI). This research includes large programs in major-market engine categories, such as heavy-duty, non-road, and light-duty; and includes diesel, gasoline, and alternative fuel aspects. This presentation describes several key diesel engine programs being pursued under the SwRI Clean High Efficiency Diesel Engine consortium (CHEDE-VI), whose goal is to demonstrate future diesel technology exceeding 50% brake thermal efficiency. Additionally, SwRI?s High Efficiency Dilute Gasoline Engines consortium (HEDGE-II), is reviewed, where advanced technology for ultra-high efficiency gasoline engines is being demonstrated. The HEDGE-II program is built upon dilute gasoline engine research, where brake thermal efficiencies in excess of 42% are being obtained for engines applicable to the light-duty market. Presenter Charles E.
Training / Education

Diesel Engine Noise Control Web Seminar RePlay

Anytime
This web seminar provides an in-depth overview of diesel engine noise including combustion and mechanical noise sources. In addition, the instructor will discuss a system approach to automotive integration including combining sub-systems and components to achieve overall vehicle noise and vibration goals.
Book

Diesel Exhaust Aftertreatment 2000-2007

2008-04-01
Diesel engines continue to be widely used in heavy-duty commercial applications around the world, and they are also gaining popularity in light-duty applications such as passenger cars. With this comes increased concern for and regulation of diesel emissions - most notably particulate matter (PM) and nitric oxide (NOx) emissions. As the restrictions grow tighter, exhaust aftertreatment technologies must become more efficient and reliable. The 55 SAE technical papers in this compilation will guide engineers in their efforts to meet these new regulations, by summarizing the latest diesel exhaust aftertreatment technology for both light- and heavy-duty applications.
Technical Paper

the behavior of Radiation-Resistant ANP TURBINE LUBRICANTS

1959-01-01
590051
RADIATION can produce almost instantaneous failure of modern aircraft lubricants, tests at Southwest Research Institute show. Two types of failures demonstrated are rapid viscosity rise and loss of heat conductivity. Furthermore, it was found that lubricants can become excessively corrosive under high-level radiation. Generally speaking, the better lubricants appeared to improve in performance while marginal ones deteriorated to a greater extent under radiation. When the better lubricants were subjected to static irradiation prior to the deposition test, there was a minor increase in deposition number as the total dose was increased.
Technical Paper

Piston-Turbine-Compound Engine — A Design and Performance Analysis

1965-02-01
650632
Exhaust heat utilization for internal combustion engines has centered around turbosupercharging in recent years, neglecting the promising field of compounding a piston engine with a gas turbine in which, unlike turbocharging, turbine power is fed back to the engine crankshaft. The piston engine can cope with high gas pressure and temperature, whereas the gas turbine can efficiently utilize the energy at relatively low pressure and temperature and large volume flows. By compounding, this-piston engine will handle the high pressure, high temperature phase of the combustion cycle and extend the expansion ratio of the gases to atmospheric pressure by completing the low pressure, low temperature phase in the gas turbine. The marriage of the two engines will result in an outstanding power package with the highest thermal efficiency possible.
Technical Paper

Dual Fuel Combustion of Propane in a Railroad Diesel Engine

1963-01-01
630450
Fuel conservationists will welcome this practicable proposal for converting railroads from diesel fuel to propane gas propulsion. Propane is no newcomer to the fuel family, but the advantages of economy, simplicity of operation, minimal maintenance, and extended life of equipment, as presented in this paper, show up its unexploited and extensive potential use in all mobile units. This careful study includes experimental results and data especially applied to railroad engines, even to conversion plans for existing engines that allows an interchangeable fuel system to accommodate present supply and variable cost factors in the United States.
Technical Paper

Maneuverability of Trailer Trains

1963-01-01
630491
This paper is concerned with an adjustable scale model capable of tracing maneuverability patterns of trailer trains. The transient kinematic paths of a multiple unit carrier of train configuration consisting of ten cargo units provided with conventional two wheel steering, conventional four wheel steering, and modified four wheel steering with a steering ratio and delayed steering action are investigated and discussed.
Technical Paper

A Bench Test Facility for Engine Muffler Evaluation

1963-01-01
630283
The problem associated with laboratory evaluation of muffler acoustical characteristics are complicated both by the acoustical considerations involved in obtaining an adequate noise source and by the ambiguities involved in defining what constitutes quality in a muffler built for general application. In order to quantitatively define the characteristics of quality mufflers, an extensive series of field tests were conducted on a variety of sizes and types of mufflers in conjunction with four engine configurations. Work then turned to the development of a wide band siren noise source and acoustical test system which would simulate the high impedance character of an engine exhaust noise source, and in addition generate the necessary intensity and spectral characteristics required to obtain test data over the range of noise conditions encountered in the field.
Technical Paper

Passenger Car Hydrocarbon Emissions

1962-01-01
620005
This paper presents the results of an investigation of the normal sources of hydrocarbon emissions of passenger cars. The sources were considered to consist of the crankcase ventilation and exhaust systems, the carburetor, and the fuel tank vent. Many studies involving the emissions from several of these sources have been conducted and reported; however, it is believed that this is the first study designed to develop emission data from all the sources of a single group of passenger cars. Although only five vehicles were used, several mechanical conditions and engine and power train configurations were examined. The largest single source of hydrocarbon emissions was found to be the exhaust, followed by the road draft tube. Relatively minor emissions were measured as a result of fuel evaporation from the carburetor and fuel tank during periods of operation and hot soak.
Technical Paper

Diesel Exhaust Hydrocarbon Measurement - A Flame-Ionization Method

1970-02-01
700106
The design and development of an instrument for the measurement of total hydrocarbons in diesel exhaust are described, and its ability to measure steady-state and transient hydrocarbon emissions is indicated. The two-section system comprises a sampling train and flame-ionization detector and a chromatograph electrometer, recorder and backpressure regulator. A mixture of 40% H2 and 60% He was found to be the best fuel for low O2 response with the system. The method has been used for more than a year in evaluating hydrocarbon emissions from a wide variety of diesel engines under a number of typical operating conditions. The greatest advantage of the high-temperature system is its potential for expressing the total hydrocarbon content in diesel exhaust.
Technical Paper

The Development of the Pumpless Gas Engine Concept

1970-02-01
700073
The major events in the development of a “pumpless” gas engine concept are related. The immediate objective of the subject program was to develop a combustion system for natural gas fueled engines which, when compared with conventional gas engines, would be operationally simpler and easier to maintain with no appreciable penalty in specific fuel consumption. The pumpless gas principle was successfully demonstrated on a single-cylinder, 2-cycle engine. The concept was then extended, with the aid of combustion photography, to a single-cylinder, 4-cycle laboratory engine. The feasibility of the concept was further demonstrated by the conversion of a commercially available 4-cycle, 4-cyl diesel engine.
Technical Paper

Noise Reduction Techniques as They Apply to Engine-Generator Design and Treatment

1969-02-01
690755
Small engines may require soundproofing to eliminate one or more of the following effects: hearing loss, speech interference, community annoyance, detectability, and psychological disorientation. Detectability criteria are frequently associated with military applications and may require the use of a soundproof enclosure in addition to other engine treatments. Acoustical noise sources are conveniently classed as either aerodynamic or mechanical. Aerodynamic sources are predominant on small engines. Treatment of exhaust noise by individual components, e.g., muffler, is inadequate; a system approach, through the use of an electro-acoustic analog computer, has proved to be a much more satisfactory procedure.
Journal Article

Effect of EGR on Particle Emissions from a GDI Engine

2011-04-12
2011-01-0636
Gasoline direct injected (GDI) engines are becoming a concern with respect to particulate matter (PM) emissions. The upcoming 2014 Euro 6 regulations may require a drastic reduction in solid particle number emissions from GDI engines and the proposed California Air Resources Board (CARB) LEV III regulations for 2014 and 2017 will also require some PM reduction measures. As a result, it is necessary to characterize PM emissions from GDI engines and investigate strategies that suppress particle formation during combustion. The main focus of this work was on using exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) as a means to reduce engine-out particle emissions from a GDI engine with an overall stoichiometric fuel to air mixture. A small displacement, turbocharged GDI engine was operated at a variety of steady-state conditions with differing levels of EGR to characterize total (solid plus volatile) and solid particle emissions with respect to size, number, and soot or black carbon mass.
Journal Article

Development of a Solid Exhaust Particle Number Measurement System Using a Catalytic Stripper Technology

2011-04-12
2011-01-0635
A solid particle number measurement system (SPNMS) was developed using a catalytic stripper (CS) technology instead of an evaporation tube (ET). The ET is used in commercially available systems, compliant with the Particle Measurement Program (PMP) protocol developed for European Union (EU) solid particle number regulations. The catalytic stripper consists of a small core of a diesel exhaust oxidation catalyst. The SPNMS/CS met all performance requirements under the PMP protocol. It showed a much better performance in removing large volatile tetracontane particles down to a size well below the PMP lower cut-size of 23 nm, compared to a SPNMS equipped with an ET instead of a CS. The SPNMS/CS also showed a similar performance to a commercially available system when used on a gasoline direct injection (GDI) engine exhaust.
Journal Article

Performance and Emissions of Diesel and Alternative Diesel Fuels in a Heavy-duty Industry-Standard Older Engine

2010-10-25
2010-01-2281
Conventional diesel fuel has been in the market for decades and used successfully to run diesel engines of all sizes in many applications. In order to reduce emissions and to foster energy source diversity, new fuels such as alternative and renewable, as well as new fuel formulations have entered the market. These include biodiesel, gas-to-liquid, and alternative formulations by states such as California. Performance variations in fuel economy, emissions, and compatibility for these fuels have been evaluated and debated. In some cases contradictory views have surfaced. “Sustainable”, “Renewable”, and “Clean” designations have been interchanged. Adding to the confusion, results from one fuel in one type of engine such as an older heavy-duty engine, is at times compared to that of another type such as a modern light-duty. This study was an attempt to compare the performance of several fuels in an identical environment, using the same engine, for direct comparison.
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