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Technical Paper

Investigation of the Hybrid Operating Modes Regarding Efficiency, Emissions and Comfort for the Parallel-Series Hybrid Powertrain Concept DE-REX

2018-09-10
2018-01-1828
The “Two-Drive-Transmission with Range-Extender” (called DE-REX) is an innovative hybrid powertrain concept using two electric motors and an internal combustion engine. The two electric motors are permanent magnet synchronous motors with a maximum power of 48 kW each. As combustion engine a 3 cylinder, turbocharged engine with a power of 65 kW is used. The aggregates are coupled to a transmission whose layout is characterized by consisting of two parallel 2-speed sub-transmissions. This layout offers a high flexibility and enables both parallel and series hybrid driving. The hybrid control unit (HCU) has to select the optimal driving mode and power distribution between the aggregates in regard to in some extend competing objectives like efficiency, emissions or driving comfort. In particular, the operation of the internal combustion engine with only two gear ratios is challenging.
Journal Article

Control Strategy for the Excitation of a Complete Vehicle Test Rig with Terrain Constraints

2013-04-08
2013-01-0671
A unique concept for a multi-body test rig enabling the simulation of longitudinal, steering and vertical dynamics was developed at the Institute for Mechatronic Systems (IMS) at TU Darmstadt. A prototype of this IMS test rig is currently being built. In conjunction with the IMS test rig, the Vehicle Terrain Performance Laboratory (VTPL) at Virginia Tech further developed a full car, seven degree of freedom (7 DOF) simulation model capable of accurately reproducing measured displacement, pitch, and roll of the vehicle body due to terrain excitation. The results of the 7 DOF car model were used as the reference input to the multi-body IMS test rig model. The goal of the IMS/VTPL joint effort was to determine whether or not a controller for the IMS test rig vertical actuator could accurately reproduce wheel displacements due to different measured terrain constraints.
Technical Paper

Control Strategy for the Longitudinal Degree of Freedom of a Complete Vehicle Test Rig

2012-04-16
2012-01-0232
The Institute for Mechatronic Systems in Mechanical Engineering (IMS) designed a concept for a test rig, which enables the simulation of longitudinal, steering and vertical dynamics for a complete vehicle under laboratory conditions. The main part of the test rig concept is a shaft, which contains three constant velocity joints and two ball-spline supported length compensations. It connects the wheel hub of the test car to an electric motor. In addition a linear actuator is mounted to the middle part of the shaft and a hydraulic actuator replaces the suspension strut. These actuators can load the longitudinal, steering and vertical degree of freedom of the test car according to simulated driving maneuvers. A prototype of this concept is being built at the IMS lab. Beginning with a precise explanation of the test rig concept this paper discusses the control strategy for the rotational speed of the wheel hub of the car mounted on the test rig based on a simulation.
Journal Article

Car-in-the-Loop Complete Vehicle Test Rig

2015-04-14
2015-01-0647
During the last years mechatronic systems developed into one of the biggest drivers of innovation in the automotive industry. The start of production of systems like dual clutch transmission, lane departure warning systems and active suspensions proves this statement. These systems have an influence on the longitudinal, steering and vertical dynamics of the vehicle. That is why the interaction on vehicle level is crucial for an optimal result in the fields of efficiency, comfort, safety and dynamics. To optimize the interaction of mechatronic systems, in this paper a new test rig concept for a complete vehicle is presented. The so-called Car-in-the-Loop-concept is capable of realistically reproducing the loads, which act on the powertrain, the steering and the suspension during a test drive.
Journal Article

Comparison of Parameter-Identified Simulation Models with Different Detailing Level to Reproduce the Side Shaft Torque of an Automotive Powertrain with Automatic Transmission

2016-04-05
2016-01-1148
The underlying basic model represents a powertrain with automatic transmission including a torque converter. It is based on a greybox-modeling approach, which refers to ordinary differential equations with identified parameters and characteristic curves. The validated basic model is extended in order to reproduce the system behavior and especially the side shaft torque during a gear shift process. Therefore the model is extended by a transmission model with clutches for gear shifting in order to simulate specific powertrain dynamics additionally. The parameters have already been determined for the basic model using a method for isolated and structured parameter identification based on measurement data of an automotive powertrain test bench. A comparable structured parameter identification method is applied to obtain the parameters of the extended model.
Journal Article

Signal Generator for Prediction of Transient Control Signals of an Automotive Transmission Control Unit Depending on Scalar Calibration Parameters

2016-10-17
2016-01-2155
In this investigation an innovative signal generator will be introduced, which enables the generation of transient control signals for the gearshift process. The signals are generated merely depending on scalar transmission control unit (TCU) calibration parameters. The signal generator replaces the comprehensive TCU software within the simulation environment. Thus no extensive residual bus simulation is required. Multiple experimental models represent the core part of the signal generator. To predict the system behavior of the underlying system, the models are trained using measured data from a powertrain with automatic transmission mounted on a test rig. The results demonstrate that the introduced signal generator is suitable to predict transient control signals for the gearshift operation accurately. In combination with an additional powertrain model it is possible to simulate the gearshift process and subsequently to evaluate the gearshift comfort.
Technical Paper

Impact of European Real-Driving-Emissions Legislation on Exhaust Gas Aftertreatment Systems of Turbocharged Direct Injected Gasoline Vehicles

2017-03-28
2017-01-0924
Recently, the European Union has adopted a new regulation on Real-Driving-Emissions (RDE) and also China is considering RDE implementation into new China 6 legislation. The new RDE regulation is focused on measuring nitrogen oxides (NOx) and particulate number (PN) emissions of both light-duty gasoline and diesel vehicles under real world conditions. A supplemental RDE test procedure was developed for European type approval, which includes on-road testing with cars equipped with portable emission measurement systems (PEMS). This new regulation will significantly affect the engine calibrations and the exhaust gas aftertreatment. In this study the impact of the new RDE regulation on two recent EU 6b certified turbocharged direct injected gasoline vehicles has been investigated. A comparison of several chassis dyno drive cycles with two new defined on-road RDE cycles was performed.
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