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Technical Paper

An Experimental and Analytical Study of the Fatigue Life of Weldments with Longitudinal Attachments

2001-03-05
2001-01-0085
Both the experimental results and the analytical predictions of this study confirm that the poor fatigue performance of weldments with longitudinal attachments is due to poor weld quality which in turn leads to either a cold-lap or a very small weld toe radius. as well as to the combination of a very high 3-D stress concentration, and very high tensile residual stresses. Consequently, a specially designed stress-concentration-reducing part termed “stress diffuser” incorporated in the wrap-around welds at the ends of the longitudinal attachments increased the fatigue strength of longitudinal attachments to equal that of transverse attachments but only when cold-laps were eliminated. The fatigue life predictions made using the a two-stage Initiation-Propagation (IP) Model were in good agreement with the experimental results. Procedures for correcting for the curved shape of the crack path are investigated.
Technical Paper

Biomechanical Realism Versus Algorithmic Efficiency: A Trade-off in Human Motion Simulation Modeling

2001-06-26
2001-01-2090
The purpose this paper is to delineate why there exists a trade-off between biomechanical realism and algorithmic efficiency for human motion simulation models, and to illustrate how empirical human movement data and findings can be integrated with novel modeling techniques to overcome such a realism-efficiency tradeoff. We first review three major classes of biomechanical models for human motion simulation. The review of these models is woven together by a common fundamental problem of redundancy—kinematic and/or muscle redundancy. We describe how this problem is resolved in each class of models, and unveil how the trade-off arises, that is, how the computational demand associated with solving the problem is amplified as a model evolves from small scale to large scale, or from less realism to more realism.
Technical Paper

Injector Nozzle Coking With Oxygenated Diesel

2001-05-07
2001-01-2016
The use of substances other than petroleum based fuels for power sources is not a new concept. Prior to the advent of petroleum fueled vehicles numerous other substances were used to create mobile sources of power. As the world's petroleum supply dwindles, alternative fuel sources are sought after to replace petroleum fuels. Many industries are particularly interested in the development of renewable fuel sources, or biologically derived fuel sources, which includes ethanol. The use of No. 2 diesel as well as many alternative fuels in compression ignition engines result in injector coking. Injector coking can severely limit engine performance by limiting the amount of fuel delivered to the combustion chamber and altering the spray pattern. Injector tip coking is also one of the most sensitive measures of diesel fuel quality [1]. A machine vision system was implemented to quantify injector coking accumulation when a compression ignition engine was fueled with oxydiesel.
Technical Paper

Ventilated Brake Rotor Air Flow Investigation

1997-02-24
971033
Air flow through the passages of a Chrysler LH platform ventilated brake rotor is measured. Modifications to the production rotor's vent inlet geometry are prototyped and measured in addition to the production rotor. Vent passage air flow is compared to existing correlations. The inlet modifications show significantly improved vent air flow, over the production rotor. The result improvement in heat transfer and rotor cooling is reported. These benefits in performance should be attainable at very low increases in production cost.
Technical Paper

Analytical Descriptions of Service Loading Suitable for Fatigue Analysis

1997-04-08
971535
Service loading histories have the same general character for an individual route and the magnitudes vary from driver to driver. Both the magnitude and character of the loading history change from route to route and a linear scaling of one loading history does not characterize the variability of usage over a wide range of operating conditions. In this paper a technique for measuring and extrapolating cumulative exceedance diagrams to quantify the distribution of service loading in a vehicle is described. Monte Carlo simulations are coupled with the local stress strain approach for fatigue to obtain distributions of service loading. Fatigue life estimates based on the original loading histories are compared to those obtained from statistical descriptions of exceedance diagrams.
Technical Paper

Adaptive Lift Control for a Camless Electrohydraulic Valvetrain

1998-02-23
981029
Camless actuation offers programmable flexibility in controlling engine valve events. However, a full range of engine benefits will only be available, if the actuation system can control lift profile characteristics within a particular lift event. Control of the peak value of valve lift is a first step in controlling the profile. The paper presents an adaptive feedback control of valve lift for a springless electrohydraulic valvetrain. The adaptive control maintains peak value of lift in presence of variations in engine speed, hydraulic fluid temperature and manufacturing variability of valve assemblies. The control design includes a reduced-order model of the system dynamics. Experimental results show dynamic behavior under various operating and environmental conditions and demonstrate advantages of adaptive control over the non-adaptive type.
Technical Paper

The Effects of Cylinder Head Deformation and Asymmetry on Exhaust Valve Thermo-Mechanical Stresses

1998-02-23
981034
A geometrically accurate, three-dimensional finite element model of a Diesel engine exhaust valve and cylinder head assembly has been developed to analyze the effect of cylinder head interactions on exhaust valve stresses. Results indicate that a multi-lobed stress pattern occurs around the exhaust valve head due to cylinder head deformation, stiffness variations, and thermal asymmetry. Consequently, peak valve bending and hoop stresses from the three-dimensional model are 48% and 40% higher, respectively, than for the two-dimensional, axisymmetric model. These results indicate the degree of model complexity required for more accurate analyses of exhaust valve operating stresses.
Technical Paper

Analysis of Residual Stresses and Cyclic Deformation for Induction Hardened Components

1995-02-01
950707
Induction hardening of mild steel components often results in significant improvements in the static and cyclic load capability, with comparatively small increases in cost. Members subjected primarily to torsional loading are a relevant subset of the broad range of induction hardened components. Due to the variation of material properties and residual stresses, failures are “initiated” at the traditional geometric locations predicted for homogeneous materials and also at subsurface sites. The introduction of shear based fatigue parameters has necessitated the consideration of the residual stress as a three dimensional quantity, especially when analyzing subsurface failures. Not considering the tensoral nature of the residual stress can lead to serious errors when estimating fatigue life, and for larger magnitude loadings, the residual stress field may relax.
Technical Paper

An Investigation of the Feasibility of Refrigerant Charge Loss Detection Using Low Cost Measurements

1997-02-24
970106
The feasibility of automatically detecting refrigerant charge loss in mobile air conditioning (MAC) systems by analyzing inexpensive dynamic measurements was studied. An indicator of the refrigerant inventory of the evaporator was developed. This measure, termed Time to Temperature Turning (TTT), is based on dynamic measurement of the evaporator outlet refrigerant temperature, and correlates strongly with charge level. TTT correlated well with clutch cycling behavior, a metric which is employed in current shop diagnostic practice to indicate refrigerant charge loss. Laboratory data were generated from a factorial experiment design on the following factors: condenser air inlet temperature, condenser air flow rate, evaporator air inlet temperature, compressor speed, and refrigerant charge. Experiments to date were conducted with a dry evaporator.
Technical Paper

Dynamic Model of a Springless Electrohydraulic Valvetrain

1997-02-24
970248
A dynamic model for the springless electrohydraulic valvetrain has been developed. The model speeds up the valvetrain development process by simulating effects of parameter changes, thus minimizing the number of hardware variations. It includes dynamic characteristics of check valves that enable energy recovery, hydraulic snubbers that limit seating velocity of the engine valves, and leakage in the control solenoids. A good match of the experimental data has been obtained for a single valve system, and the model calibration and validation have been completed. The known parameters are used together with some unknown calibration constants which have been tuned to match the experimental data. The simulation results for a twin valve system are also presented. The model applications for system performance analysis and for the closed-loop control of the engine valve lift are described. The cyclic variability of the experimental data is also discussed.
Technical Paper

Examining the Trade-Off Between Automobile Acceleration Performance and Fuel Economy

1996-02-01
960004
A method for making value tradeoff decisions between fuel economy and acceleration performance is demonstrated. Attribute value as defined by the S-Model Theory of Quality [1,2] is measured for the attributes of fuel economy and acceleration performance through a vehicle driving clinic. Willingness-to-pay values are found for the attributes at several different levels. The willingness-to-pay values are then used to refine the empirical and economic value curves previously determined for those attributes.
Technical Paper

High Temperature Cyclic Fatigue Damage Modeling of Alumina

1994-03-01
940251
Cyclic loading is not as damaging as static loading of ceramics at high temperatures. Microcrack growth retardation has been established as a mechanism for increasing the durability of ceramics at high temperatures. A combined experimental and theoretical approach provides a mechanistic understanding of the deformation and failure processes in ceramic materials at high temperatures. Results demonstrate that the high temperature behavior of some ceramic material systems are controlled by the behavior of the grain boundary phase whose response is considerably different under static and cyclic loading.
Technical Paper

Oversteer/Understeer Characteristics of a Locked Differential

1994-12-01
942485
The type of differential used in a vehicle has an important and often-neglected effect on handling performance. This is particularly important in racing applications, such as in IndyCar racing, in which the type of differential chosen depends on the course being raced (superspeedway ovals, short ovals, temporary street courses and permanent road courses). In the present work, we examine the effect of a locked rear differential on oversteer/understeer behavior. Using a linear tire model, it is shown that employing a locked differential adds a constant understeer offset to the steering wheel angle (SWA) -v- lateral acceleration vehicle signature. A computer simulation of steady-state cornering behavior showed that the actual effect is much more complicated, and is strongly influenced by static weight distribution, front/rear roll couple distribution, available traction and the radius of the turn being negotiated.
Technical Paper

Test Vehicle Steering Systems

1994-09-01
941740
In order to test and design vehicle systems it is often necessary to develop prototypes. A vehicle's steering system requires a qualitative analysis since it is difficult to quantify and measure subjective quantities such as the “feel” of a steering system. The virtual prototype system (VPS) provides an effective and flexible way of developing and testing the prototypes for qualitative testing. By creating a computer model of a vehicle's steering system using a dynamic simulation package and linking it to a virtual reality vehicle, a designer can drive the virtual prototype vehicle as if he or she were operating an actual vehicle.
Technical Paper

Neural Networks in Engineering Diagnostics

1994-04-01
941116
Neural networks are massively parallel computational models for knowledge representation and information processing. The capabilities of neural networks, namely learning, noise tolerance, adaptivity, and parallel structure make them good candidates for application to a wide range of engineering problems including diagnostics problems. The general approach in developing neural network based diagnostic methods is described through a case study. The development of an acoustic wayside train inspection system using neural networks is described. The study is aimed at developing a neural network based method for detection defective wheels from acoustic measurements. The actual signals recorded when a train passes a wayside station are used to develop a neural network based wheel defect detector and to study its performance. Signal averaging and scoring techniques are developed to improve the performance of the constructed neural inspection system.
Technical Paper

Dual-Pump Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering Measurements in a Direct-Injection Natural Gas Engine

1998-02-23
980144
Single-laser-shot measurements of the fuel/air ratio in the cylinder of a motored direct-injection natural gas (DING) engine were obtained using a dual-pump coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) technique capable of simultaneously probing N2 and CH4. The DING engine was modified for optical access and CARS was used to probe the region near the glow plug. Measurements were acquired at eight different probe volume locations with one crank angle degree resolution for injections starting at 30° and 20° BTDC. The CARS data clearly show the arrival of the fuel jet at the probe volume and, from traversing the probe volume, the location of the centerlines of two fuel jets in the vicinity of the glow plug. The CARS measurements also show large fluctuations in fuel concentration on a shot-to-shot basis indicating the presence of large-scale mixing structures within the fuel jets.
Technical Paper

Methane Jet Penetration in a Direct-Injection Natural Gas Engine

1998-02-01
980143
A direct-injection natural gas (DING) engine was modified for optical access to allow the use of laser diagnostic techniques to measure species concentrations and temperatures within the cylinder. The injection and mixing processes were examined using planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) of acetone-seeded natural gas to obtain qualitative maps of the fuel/air ratio. Initial acetone PLIF images were acquired in a quiescent combustion chamber with the piston locked in a position corresponding to 90° BTDC. A series of single shot images acquired in 0.1 ms intervals was used to measure the progression of one of the fuel jets across the cylinder. Cylinder pressures as high as 2 MPa were used to match the in-cylinder density during injection in a firing engine. Subsequent images were acquired in a motoring engine at 600 rpm with injections starting at 30, 20, and 15° BTDC in 0.5 crank angle degree increments.
Technical Paper

In-Cylinder Measurements of Liquid Fuel During the Intake Stroke of a Port-Injected Spark Ignition Engine

1997-10-01
972945
The presence and distribution of liquid fuel within an engine cylinder at cold start may adversely affect the hydrocarbon emissions from port-injected, spark ignition engines. Therefore, high speed videos of the liquid fuel entry into the cylinder of an optical engine were recorded in order to assess the effect of various engine operating parameters on the amount of liquid fuel inducted into the cylinder, the sizes of liquid drops present and the distribution of the fuel within the cylinder. A 2.5L, V-6, port-injected, spark ignition engine was modified so that optical access is available throughout the entire volume of one of the cylinders. A fused silica cylinder is sandwiched between the separated block and head of the engine and a “Bowditch-type” piston extension is mounted to the production piston. The Bowditch piston has a fused silica crown so that visualization is possible through the top of the piston as well as through the transparent cylinder.
Technical Paper

Back-Flow Atomization in the Intake Port of Spark Ignition Engines

1997-10-01
972988
Drop size measurements were performed in the intake port of a motoring engine using a laser diffraction particle sizing technique. The experimental parameters which were varied include number of injection cycles, start of injection timing, engine speed and manifold pressure. Two injectors having different atomization and dispersion characteristics were used in the study, a production dual jet injector which produced Sauter Mean Diameters (SMDs) in the range of 250 to 400 μm and an air assist injector which had a line-of-sight SMD of 39 μm. In measurements with the dual jet injector, after initial injection, the quantity of fuel present in the intake port was observed to increase with each subsequent injection event, reaching a steady state value after 6 to 10 injection cycles. The SMD produced by the back-flow atomization was independent of the number of injection events and independent of engine speed over a range of 750 to 1500 RPM.
Technical Paper

Experimental Study of Open-Wheel Race-Car Front Wings

1998-11-16
983042
An experimental study was performed at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Low-Speed Wind Tunnel to quantify the performance and flowfield effects of two-element open-wheel-race-car front wing configurations. Four distinct configurations were tested in- and out-of-ground effect and at various speeds (Reynolds numbers), angles of attack, and flap positions. A splitter plate was installed in the wind tunnel to act as the ground plane. Data presented include balance force measurements, surface pressure data, and downstream flow measurements using a seven-hole probe. Results show that these elementary factors in the design of race-car front wings have a significant effect on wing performance and behavior of the downstream flowfield.
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