Refine Your Search

Search Results

Viewing 1 to 10 of 10
Technical Paper

Noise and Vibration Characterisation of Cast Iron and Siliconised Carbon Composite Brake Rotors

2005-05-16
2005-01-2313
This paper reports the results of a back-to-back comparison of the squeal and judder propensity of simple cast iron and siliconised carbon disk brake systems. A finite element simulation approach is used to predict the squeal propensity of the two systems based on the results of a complex eigenvalue analysis. These results which are validated by dynamometer noise tests carried out according to the SAE J2521 [1] standard procedure show that the siliconised carbon rotor is much less prone to squeal over the range of conditions considered. The combined experimental and numerical simulation approach is also applied to the problem of hot judder for the two rotors. The critical rotational speeds for hot spots to form are predicted to be an order of magnitude higher for the siliconised carbon rotor system. These results demonstrate the potential of the new carbon composite rotor material to reduce the occurrence of noise and vibration problems in automotive brakes.
Technical Paper

Integration of Active Suspension and Active Driveline to Improve Vehicle Dynamics

2004-11-30
2004-01-3544
Many active control systems are developed as safety systems for passenger vehicles. These control systems usually focus on improving vehicle stability and safety while ignoring the effects on the vehicle driveability. In the motorsport environment, increased stability is desirable but not if the driveability of the vehicle is heavily compromised. In this work, active suspension and active drivelines are examined to improve vehicle dynamics and enhance driveability while maintaining stability. The active control systems are developed as separate driveability and stability controls and tested individually then integrated to create a multi-objective control system to improve both driveability and stability. The controllers are tested with standard vehicle manoeuvres.
Technical Paper

Effects of Thermal Deformations on the Squeal Propensity of a Simple Automotive Disc Brake System

2008-10-12
2008-01-2532
Brake squeal has been found to be related to varying temperatures. In order to investigate this problem, the finite element method is applied to a disc brake system. Thermal analysis is incorporated to assist complex eigenvalue analysis to extract unstable modes which may contribute to squealing phenomena over a series of discrete temperatures. The SAE J2521 test sequence is simulated to predict the temperature variations on the whole three dimensional geometry of the brake pads and the disc, during the prescribed drag braking situations. This coupled thermal structural analysis considers different stages of the drag brake event, particularly the difference in the temperature distribution and consequent contact status during the heating and cooling stages. The coupled analysis leads to the prediction of squealing instability measures and frequency spectra.
Technical Paper

Vehicle Handling Analysis Using Linearisation Around Non-Linear Operating Conditions

1996-02-01
960482
A non-linear example vehicle model including four degrees of freedom (yaw, sideslip, roll and steering), non-linear kinematics and the Magic Formula tyre model has been developed. With the assumption of small perturbations around any steady-state working condition, the linearised equations are derived. A novel approach is used for the linearisation of external forces and moments from the tyres. They are linearised in terms of the state variables rather than the slip angle, camber angle and vertical load which are themselves functions of the state variables. The results of this process are expressed in terms of stability derivatives. In order to use the method, the steady-state solution of the non-linear equations is first obtained for a particular value of lateral acceleration, then after the calculation of the stability derivatives, a linear analysis can be performed for the linear equations in terms of perturbed variables.
Technical Paper

Mechanical Performance of V-Ribbed Belt Drives (Experimental Investigation)

1997-02-24
970006
A non-contacting laser displacement meter has been used for dynamic measurements of the radial movement of a v-ribbed belt (type 3PK) around the arc of wrap running on a belt testing rig. Accurate and repeatable results are possible. Using this device, the belt radial movement and the beginning of rib bottom / groove tip contact around the arc of wrap have been determined experimentally for v-ribbed belts. Slip, torque loss, maximum torque capacity and efficiency have been measured during the tests.
Technical Paper

Integrated Active Steering and Variable Torque Distribution Control for Improving Vehicle Handling and Stability

2004-03-08
2004-01-1071
This paper proposes an advanced control strategy to improve vehicle handling and directional stability by integrating either Active Front Steering (AFS) or Active Rear Steering (ARS) with Variable Torque Distribution (VTD) control. Both AFS and ARS serve as the steerability controller and are designed to achieve the improved yaw rate tracking in low to mid-range lateral acceleration using Sliding Mode Control (SMC); while VTD is used as the stability controller and employs differential driving torque between left and right wheels on the same axle to produce a relatively large stabilizing yaw moment when the vehicle states (sideslip angle and its angular velocity) exceed the reference stable region defined in the phase plane. Based on these stand-alone subsystems, an integrated control scheme which coordinates the control actions of both AFS/ARS and VTD is proposed. The functional difference between AFS and ARS when integrated with VTD is explained physically.
Technical Paper

Drum Brake Contact Analysis and its Influence on Squeal Noise Prediction

2003-10-19
2003-01-3348
A non-linear contact analysis of a leading-trailing shoe drum brake, using the finite element method, is presented. The FE model accurately captures both the static and pseudo-dynamic behaviour at the friction interface. Flexible-to-flexible contact surfaces with elastic friction capabilities are used to determine the pressure distribution. Static contact conditions are established by initially pressing the shoes against the drum. This first load step is followed by a gradual increase of applied rotation to the drum in order to define the maximum reacted braking torque and pseudo-dynamic pressure distribution at the transition point between sticking and sliding motion. The method clearly illustrates the changes in contact force that take place as a function of the applied pressure, coefficient of friction and initial gap between lining and rotor. These changes in contact area are shown to influence the overall stability and therefore squeal propensity of the brake assembly.
Technical Paper

Optimisation of Alumina Coated Lightweight Brake Rotor

2014-09-28
2014-01-2501
Aluminium alloys have been used extensively in the automotive industry to reduce the weight of a vehicle and improve fuel consumption which in turn leads to a reduction in engine emissions. The main aim of the current study is to replace the conventional cast iron rotor material with a lightweight alternative such as coated aluminium alloy. The main challenge has been to meet both the cost and functional demands of modern mass-produced automotive braking systems. A sensitivity analysis based on the Taguchi approach was carried out to investigate the effect of various parameters on the thermal performance of a typical candidate disc brake. Wrought aluminium disc brake rotors coated with alumina on the rubbing surfaces were determined to have the best potential for replacing the conventional cast iron rotor at reasonable cost. Optimisation of the structure was subsequently carried out using a genetic algorithm on the selected coated aluminium disc brake rotor.
Technical Paper

Improving Performance of a 6×6 Off-Road Vehicle Through Individual Wheel Control

2002-03-04
2002-01-0968
This paper presents a method of control for a 6×6 series-configured Hybrid Electric Off-road Vehicle (HEOV). The vehicle concerned is an eight-tonne logistics support vehicle which utilizes Hub Mounted Electric Drives (HMED) at each of its six wheel stations. This set-up allows Individual Wheel Control (IWC) to be implemented to improve vehicle handling and mobility. Direct Yaw-moment Control (DYC) is a method of regulating individual wheel torque to control vehicle yaw motion, providing greater stability in cornering. When combined with both a Traction Control System (TCS) and an Anti-lock Braking System (ABS) the tire/road interaction is fully controlled, leading to improved control over vehicle dynamics, whilst also improving vehicle safety.
Technical Paper

Integration of Active Suspension and Active Driveline to Ensure Stability While Improving Vehicle Dynamics

2005-04-11
2005-01-0414
Most active control systems developed for passenger vehicles are developed as safety systems. These control systems usually focus on improving vehicle stability and safety while ignoring the effects on the vehicle driveability. While stability is the primary concern of these control systems the driveability of the vehicle is also an important consideration. An example of compromised driveability in a stability control system is brake based active yaw control. Brake based systems are very effective at stability control but can have a negative impact on the longitudinal dynamics of a vehicle. The objective of the vehicle control systems developed for the future will be to preserve vehicle driveability while ensuring the stability of the vehicle. In this work, active suspension and active drivelines are developed as stability control systems that have a minimal impact on the driveability of the vehicle.
X