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Technical Paper

Finite Element Modeling of Bolt Load Retention of Die-Cast Magnesium

2000-03-06
2000-01-1121
The use of die cast magnesium for automobile transmission cases offers promise for reducing weight and improving fuel economy. However, the inferior creep resistance of magnesium alloys at high temperature is of concern since transmission cases are typically assembled and joined by pre-loaded bolts. The stress relaxation of the material could thus adversely impact the sealing of the joint. One means of assessing the structural integrity of magnesium transmission cases is modeling the bolted joint, the topic of this paper. The commercial finite element code, ABAQUS, was used to simulate a well characterized bolt joint sample. The geometry was simulated with axi-symmetric elements with the exact geometry of a M10 screw. Frictional contact between the male and female parts is modeled by using interface elements. Material creep is described by a time hardening power law whose parameters are fit to experimental creep test data.
Technical Paper

The Effect of Copper Level and Solidification Rate on the Aging Behavior of a 319-Type Cast Aluminum Alloy

2000-03-06
2000-01-0759
Compositional and microstructural variations in a casting can often result in rather significant variations in the response to a given aging treatment, leading to location dependent mechanical properties. The objective of this study is to determine the effect of copper content and solidification rate on the aging behavior of a type 319 cast aluminum alloy. The nominal composition of the alloy is Al-7% Si-3.5% Cu-0.25% Mg, however, typical secondary 319 aluminum specifications allow copper levels to vary from 3-4%. Solidification rates throughout a casting can vary greatly due to, among other factors, differences in section size. To determine the effect of copper level and solidification rate on the aging response, aging curves were experimentally developed for this alloy. Three different copper levels (3, 3.5, 4%) and two solidification rates were used for this study. Aging temperatures ranged from 150-290°C with nine aging times at each temperature.
Technical Paper

Influence of Textures on Sheet Forming

2000-03-06
2000-01-0771
This paper reviews the relationship of the anisotropy of plastic behavior of sheet metal to crystallographic textures and the effect of anisotropic plastic behavior on sheet forming processes Although the basis is crystallographic, the anisotropy of cubic metals can be approximated by a continuum yield criterion. Use of this criterion in analyses of sheet forming gives better results than the usual quadratic criterion.
Technical Paper

Failure Prediction of Sheet Metals Based on an Anisotropic Gurson Model

2000-03-06
2000-01-0766
A failure prediction methodology that can predict sheet metal failure under arbitrary deformation histories including rotating principal stretch directions and bending/unbending with consideration of damage evolution is reviewed in this paper. An anisotropic Gurson yield criterion is adopted to characterize the effects of microvoids on the load carrying capacity of sheet metals where Hill’s quadratic anisotropic yield criterion is used to describe the matrix normal anisotropy and planar isotropy. The evolution of the void damage is based on the growth, nucleation and coalescence of microvoids. Mroz’s anisotropic hardening rule, which was proposed based on the cyclic plastic behavior of metals observed in experiments, is generalized to characterize the anisotropic hardening behavior due to loading/unloading with consideration of the evolution of void volume fraction. The effects of yield surface curvature are also included in the plasticity model.
Technical Paper

‘ElderTech’ - Enhancing the Independence of Elderly Through the Use of Technology

2000-03-06
2000-01-1368
Longevity is one of the great achievements of the twentieth century. This paper will explore ways that elderly people can employ technology to enhance their independence, loosely termed “ElderTech.” ElderTech is designed to establish a sustained, long-term investment in research and development (R&D) for technologies that can provide the largest growing population, Americans over the age of 65, with the tools to ensure active aging (maintaining independence, self-reliance, and an enhanced quality of life). It will also promote aging in place (in the home); and will address and ease Medicare's financial burden on the federal government. ElderTech is aimed to establish a technology framework that will ensure that the United States (U.S.) is ready to meet the needs of its older Americans.
Technical Paper

An Architecture for Autonomous Agents in a Driving Simulator

2000-04-02
2000-01-1596
The addition of synthetic traffic to a driving simulation greatly enhances the realism of the virtual world. Giving this traffic human-like behavior is likewise desirable, and has been the focus of some research over the past few years. This paper presents a modular architecture for including autonomous traffic in a driving simulation, and describes the first steps taken toward the application of this architecture to the DaimlerChrysler Auburn Hills Simulator. By separating the planning part of the agent from the low-level control and vehicle dynamics systems, the described architecture permits the inclusion of powerful, previously developed components in a straightforward way; in the present application, agents use Soar to reason about their actions. This paper gives an overview of the structures of the agents, and of the entire system, describes the components and their implementations, and discusses the current state of the project and plans for the future.
Technical Paper

Optimizing Vehicle Life Using Life Cycle Energy Analysis and Dynamic Replacement Modeling

2000-04-26
2000-01-1499
A novel application in the field of Life Cycle Assessment is presented that investigates optimal vehicle retirement timing and design life. This study integrates Life Cycle Energy Analysis (LCEA) with Dynamic Replacement Modeling and quantifies the energy tradeoffs between operating an older vehicle versus replacing it with a new more energy efficient model. The decision to keep or replace a vehicle to minimizes life cycle energy consumption is influenced by several factors including vehicle production energy, current vehicle's fuel economy and its deterioration with age, the improvement in fuel economy technology of new model vehicles and annual vehicle miles traveled (VMT). Model simulations explore vehicle replacement under incremental improvements in vehicle technology and leapfrog technology improvements such as with the PNGV (Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles).
Technical Paper

Understanding and Modeling NOx Emissions from Air Conditioned Automobiles

2000-03-06
2000-01-0858
The emission of excessive quantities of NOx when the automobile air conditioner is turned on has received a fair amount of attention in recent years. Since NOx is a smog precursor, it is important to understand the reasons for this jump in emissions especially on hot sunny days when air conditioner usage is at a maximum. A simple thermodynamic model is used to demonstrate how the torque from a typical air conditioner compressor is mainly related to the ambient temperature. The compressor's on-off cycling patterns are also characterized. Since the compressor significantly loads the engine, it affects fuel economy and emissions. The key independent variable that we employ to represent engine load is fuel rate. The correlations between engine-out NOx emissions and fuel rate are shown for a number of light duty vehicles and trucks. From these, a physical model for engine-out NOx emissions (with and without air conditioning) is presented.
Technical Paper

Seat Belt Retractor Rattle: Understanding Root Sources and Testing Methods

1999-05-17
1999-01-1729
This paper describes the rattle mechanisms that exist in seat belt retractors and the vehicle acceleration conditions that induce these responses. Three principal sources of rattle include: 1) the sensor, 2) the spool, and 3) the lock pawl. In-vehicle acceleration measurements are used to characterize retractor excitation and are subsequently employed for laboratory testing of retractor rattle. The merits and demerits of two testing methods, based on frequency domain and time domain shaker control, are discussed.
Technical Paper

Modeling Fully-Coupled Rigid Engine Dynamics and Vibrations

1999-05-17
1999-01-1749
The internal combustion (IC) engine is an important source of vibration in many vehicles, and understanding its dynamic response to demands from both the vehicle operator and the terrain is essential to proper engine and mount design and optimization. Development of an engineering tool for understanding this dynamic response and the resulting forces transmitted from the engine block to the supporting structure is a priority in both commercial and military engine applications. Ideally, engine dynamics and vibration would be directly simulated through effective and efficient analytical and computational models of both the internal engine component dynamics as well as engine block vibrations. The present analytical study was undertaken to produce a comprehensive and efficient rigid-body engine dynamics and vibration model which predicts engine block motion, engine mount load transmission, as well as instantaneous engine crankshaft rotational speed.
Technical Paper

Determination of Assembly Stresses in Aluminum Knuckles

1999-03-01
1999-01-0345
In this paper, an analytical method is proposed for determining the stress distributions in steering knuckle/tapered stud assemblies. The method is based on solutions of the plane stress thick cylinder interference fit problem with modifications to account for the effects of stud taper and dissimilar component materials. The analytical solutions are applied to knuckle/tapered stud assemblies. The results from the analytical solutions are compared to those from a finite element analysis. It is shown that the analytical and FEA results are in good agreement for several load and frictional conditions, and the hoop and radial stress solutions presented in this paper are good engineering solutions to the knuckle/tapered stud problem where the draw distance is provided.
Technical Paper

Spark–Ignition Engine Fuel Consumption Modeling

1999-03-01
1999-01-0554
An analytical model that describes SI engine fuel consumption and friction with basic engine physical parameters as inputs has been developed and evaluated in this study. Fundamental characteristics of SI engine indicated efficiency, heat loss and friction have been captured by the model. Despite the approximations made in arriving at the final formula of the model, the proposed fuel–rate equation has been shown to represent both the SI engine fuel consumption and WOT friction reasonably well with a base set of parameters. If both the engine performance data and motored WOT friction data are available, the proposed model can be used to obtain a more precise set of parameters that describe both the engine friction and fuel consumption accurately (fuel rate differences within ±5%) at any speed and load combinations (omitting enrichment points).
Technical Paper

A Fuel Rate Based Catalyst Pass Fraction Model for Predicting Tailpipe NOx Emissions from a Composite Car

1999-03-01
1999-01-0455
Modeling tailpipe NOx emissions has always been difficult due to the complexity of the numerous factors involved in the catalytic conversion of the pollutant. Most emissions modeling has been based on steady state driving. A parameterized algebraic model for second-by-second tailpipe emissions of NOx for a composite Tier 1 car is presented employing data from the Federal Test Procedure Revision Project (FTPRP). Calculating fuel rate from measured engine out values, the catalytic converter is physically modeled based on the fuel rate history and a few fitted parameters. Under certain conditions, the changes in fuel rate are related to trends in the air to fuel ratio. The model accurately predicts the time dependence of hot stabilized tailpipe NOx emissions in the FTP bag 3 and US06 driving cycles. Modeling of low power driving, as in bag 2, is not as successful.
Technical Paper

An Experiment-Based Model of Fabric Heat Transfer and Its Inclusion in Air Bag Deployment Simulations

1999-03-01
1999-01-0437
A numerical model is presented that is capable of isolating and quantifying the heat flux from the gas within the bag to the air bag fabric due to internal surface convection during the inflator discharge period of an air bag deployment. The model is also capable of predicting the volume averaged fabric temperatures during the air bag deployment period. Implementation of the model into an air bag deployment code, namely Inflator Simulation Program (ISP), is presented along with the simulation results for typical inflators. The predicted effect of the heat loss from the bag gas to the fabric on the internal bag gas temperature and pressure and the resulting bulk fabric temperature as a function of fabric parameters and the inflator exit gas properties are presented for both permeable and impermeable air bag fabrics.
Technical Paper

Integration of Electromagnetic and Optical Motion Tracking Devices for Capturing Human Motion Data Woojin Park

1999-05-18
1999-01-1911
For human motion studies, which are to be used for either dynamic biomechanical analyses or development of human motion simulation models, it is important to establish an empirical motion database derived from efficient measurement and well-standardized data processing methodologies. This paper describes the motion recording and data processing system developed for modeling seated reach motions at the University of Michigan's HUMOSIM Laboratory. Both electromagnetic (Flock of Birds) and optical (Qualysis) motion capture systems are being used simultaneously to record the motion data. Using both types of devices provides a robust means to record human motion, but each has different limitations and advantages. The amount of kinematic information (DOFs), external sources of noise, shadowing, off-line marker identification/tracking time, and setup cost are key differences.
Technical Paper

Simulating Reach Motions

1999-05-18
1999-01-1916
Modeling normal human reach behavior is dependent on many factors. Anthropometry, age, gender, joint mobility and muscle strength are a few such factors related to the individual being modeled. Reach locations, seat configurations, and tool weights are a few other task factors that can affect dynamic reach postures. This paper describes how two different modeling approaches are being used in the University of Michigan Human Motion Simulation Laboratory to predict normal seated reaching motions. One type of model uses an inverse kinematic structure with an optimization procedure that minimizes the weighted sum of the instantaneous velocity of each body segment. The second model employs a new functional regression technique to fit polynomial equations to the angular displacements of each body segment. To develop and validate these models, 38 subjects of widely varying age and anthropometry were asked to perform reaching motions while seated in simulated vehicle or industrial workplace.
Technical Paper

Design for the Workplace: A Manager's Guide

1999-03-01
1999-01-0419
Engineering productivity and customer-focused outcomes are ongoing concerns for managers. In order to be effective, engineering departments need to be challenging, satisfying, and productive places to work. Attracting and keeping talented engineers are constant worries in an era of uncertainty caused by competitiveness, downsizing, and restructuring. Design for the Workplace: A Manager's Guide focuses on providing maximum management support and encouragement. Engineering managers can use several strategies to create an effective workplace, including temporary job assignments, work teams, communication, training and career development, and motivation. Thoughtful planning and careful implementation are necessary for any strategy to be viable.
Technical Paper

Simulation of Combustion in Direct-Injection Low Swirl Heavy-Duty Type Diesel Engines

1999-03-01
1999-01-0228
A two phase, global combustion model has been developed for quiescent chamber, direct injection diesel engines. The first stage of the model is essentially a spark ignition engine flame spread model which has been adapted to account for fuel injection effects. During this stage of the combustion process, ignition and subsequent flame spread/heat release are confined to a mixing layer which has formed on the injected jet periphery during the ignition delay period. Fuel consumption rate is dictated by mixing layer dynamics, laminar flame speed, large scale turbulence intensity, and local jet penetration rate. The second stage of the model is also a time scale approach which is explicitly controlled by the global mixing rate. Fuel-air preparation occurs on a large-scale level throughout this phase of the combustion process with each mixed fuel parcel eventually burning at a characteristic time scale as dictated by the global mixing rate.
Technical Paper

A Distributed Control System Framework for Automotive Powertrain Control with OSEK Standard and CAN Network

1999-03-01
1999-01-1276
This paper presents a distributed control system framework for next-generation automotive control systems, in which various control units are connected with CAN bus. The framework is a software platform that performs communication between control units and invocation of application programs. The framework includes necessary functions for data transmission to meet end-to-end timing constraints in distributed control systems. Application programmers don't have to write any communication procedure but focus on developing application programs with appropriate API (Application Program Interface). The framework is based on driving force management and also OSEK, which is a standard real-time operating system (OSEK-OS) and a communication protocol (CAN) for automotive control. We are now applying our prototype framework to an adaptive cruise control system in our experimental vehicle.
Technical Paper

EMERALDS-OSEK: A Small Real-Time Operating System for Automotive Control and Monitoring

1999-03-01
1999-01-1102
Increasingly, microcontrollers are being used in automotive systems to handle sophisticated control and monitoring activities. As applications become more sophisticated, their design and development becomes complex, necessitating the use of an operating system to manage the complexity and provide an abstraction for improving portability of code. This paper presents EMERALDS-OSEK, an operating system we have designed and implemented based on OSEK/VDX, an open industry standard. We present some of the features and optimizations that make EMERALDS-OSEK appropriate for small, low-cost microcontrollers typically found in automotive applications. We also present measurements of operating system performance. We find EMERALDS-OSEK to be efficient, both in terms of processing overheads and memory usage. However, we also find some parts of the OSEK standard that may be improved, and present our ideas for such improvements.
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