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Technical Paper

Direct Visualization of High Pressure Diesel Spray and Engine Combustion

1999-10-25
1999-01-3496
An experimental study was carried out to visualize the spray and combustion inside an AVL single-cylinder research diesel engine converted for optical access. The injection system was a hydraulically-amplified electronically-controlled unit injector capable of high injection pressure up to 180 MPa and injection rate shaping. The injection characteristics were carefully characterized with injection rate meter and with spray visualization in high-pressure chamber. The intake air was supplied by a compressor and heated with a 40kW electrical heater to simulate turbocharged intake condition. In addition to injection and cylinder pressure measurements, the experiment used 16-mm high-speed movie photography to directly visualize the global structures of the sprays and ignition process. The results showed that optically accessible engines provide very useful information for studying the diesel combustion conditions, which also provided a very critical test for diesel combustion models.
Technical Paper

Experimental Investigation of the Strains and Stresses in the Cylinder Block of a Marine Diesel Engine

2000-03-06
2000-01-0520
The cylinder block of a high-speed marine diesel engine is a complex structure subjected to a complex loading. The design optimization of the cylinder block requires a reliable Finite Element Model (FEM), capable to predict, with a reasonable accuracy, the actual strains and stresses. The experimental investigation presented in the paper is meant to provide the necessary information for a better estimation of the boundary conditions and the validation of the FEM of the cylinder block. In order to obtain an image of the stress field in the cylinder block, a system of 10 strain gauge rosettes have been placed at significant locations on the cylinder block. The temperature at the location of the rosettes was measured with an optical pyrometer and a method has been developed to calculate this temperature using the measured strain. A fairly good agreement was obtained between the measured and the calculated temperatures during the cooling of the engine.
Technical Paper

Analysis and Reduction of Rattling in Power Transmission Systems

2000-03-06
2000-01-0032
Rattling in the inevitable clearances between engaging teeth of mechanical power transmission components, such as gears, gear couplings and clutches, etc., is becoming a more and more important issue, especially for automotive applications. An extensive research effort in this area is mostly dedicated to modeling of complex nonlinear processes that develop after the tooth separation occurs, or to experimental studies of these processes. The available abatement techniques for the rattling noise are expensive while not providing desirable noise reduction results. The paper presents a criterial condition for opening of clearances derived for a simplified model and clearly showing importance of various design parameters on possibility of commencement of the rattling process. Also, a novel rattling noise abatement technique is described, based on incorporating simple means for prolongation of the impact interactions between the co-impacting engaging teeth.
Technical Paper

Finite Element Simulation of Ankle/Foot Injury in Frontal Crashes

2000-03-06
2000-01-0156
Finite element models of human body segments have been developed in recent years. Numerical simulation could be helpful when understanding injury mechanisms and to make injury assessments. In the lower leg injury research in NISSAN, a finite element model of the human ankle/foot is under development. The mesh for the bony part was taken from the original model developed by Beaugonin et al., but was revised by adding soft tissue to reproduce realistic responses. Damping effect in a high speed contact was taken into account by modeling skin and fat in the sole of the foot. The plantar aponeurosis tendon was modeled by nonlinear bar elements connecting the phalanges to the calcaneus. The rigid body connection, which was defined at the toe in the original model for simplicity, was removed and the transverse ligaments were added instead in order to bind the metatarsals and the phalanges. These tendons and ligaments were expected to reproduce a realistic response in compression.
Technical Paper

Friction Losses in Multi-Cylinder Diesel Engines

2000-03-06
2000-01-0921
This paper presents a global friction model of a diesel engine. The model accounts for the individual contributions of the main components of the mechanical losses and the influence of specific design and operating parameters on the mechanical losses. The main components considered in the model are: the piston-ring assembly, the valve train, the bearings and auxiliaries (injection pump, oil pump and coolant pump). For each of these components, the model was developed based on geometric parameters, operating conditions and the physics governing the friction. The individual models were assembled in a global friction model of a multicylinder diesel engine, and a computer code was developed to simulate the total mechanical losses of the engine. The experimental validation of the model was obtained by comparing the simulated crankshaft's speed variation with the instantaneous speed measured by a shaft encoder.
Technical Paper

Analysis of Head and Neck Response During Side Impact

1999-03-01
1999-01-0717
Numerical analyses of head and neck response during side impact are presented in this paper. A mathematical human model for side impact simulation was developed based on previous studies of other researchers. The effects of muscular activities during severe side impact were analyzed with the use of this model. This study shows that the effect of muscular activities is significant especially if the occupant is prepared to resist the impact. This result suggests that the modeling of muscles is important for the simulation of real accident situation.
Technical Paper

A Faster Algorithm for the Calculation of the IMEP

2000-10-16
2000-01-2916
The Indicated Mean Effective Pressure (IMEP) is a very important engine parameter, giving significant information about the quality of the cycle that transforms heat into mechanical work. For this reason, modern data acquisition systems display, on line, the cylinder pressure variation together with the corresponding IMEP. The paper presents a very simple algorithm for the calculation of IMEP, based on the correlation between IMEP and the gas pressure torque. It was found that that the IMEP may be calculated by a very simple formula involving only two harmonic components of the cylinder pressure variation. The computation of the two harmonic components is very easily performed because it does not involve the calculation of an average pressure and the cylinder volume variation. The method was experimentally validated showing differences less than 0.2% with respect to the IMEP calculated by the traditional method.
Technical Paper

A Momentum and Energy Approach to Modeling Crash Behavior, Quantifying Crash Severity, and Identifying Crash Configurations

2000-10-03
2000-01-2714
This paper focuses on the role and significance of linear momentum and kinetic energy in controlling air bags aboard vehicles. Among the results of the study are analytic and geometric models that characterize crash behavior and control algorithms that quantify crash severity and identify crash configurations. These results constitute an effective basis for crash-data design and air-bag control.
Technical Paper

Kinematics of Human Cadaver Cervical Spine During Low Speed Rear-End Impacts

2000-11-01
2000-01-SC13
The purposes of this study were to measure the relative linear and angular displacements of each pair of adjacent cervical vertebrae and to compute changes in distance between two adjacent facet joint landmarks during low posterior- anterior (+Gx) acceleration without significant hyperextension of the head. A total of twenty-six low speed rear-end impacts were conducted using six postmortem human specimens. Each cadaver was instrumented with two to three neck targets embedded in each cervical vertebra and nine accelerometers on the head. Sequential x-ray images were collected and analyzed. Two seatback orientations were studied. In the global coordinate system, the head, the cervical vertebrae, and the first or second thoracic vertebra (T1 or T2) were in extension during rear-end impacts. The head showed less extension in comparison with the cervical spine.
Technical Paper

Development of a Finite Element Model of the Human Shoulder

2000-11-01
2000-01-SC19
Previous studies have hypothesized that the shoulder may be used to absorb some impact energy and reduce chest injury due to side impacts. Before this hypothesis can be tested, a good understanding of the injury mechanisms and the kinematics of the shoulder is critical for occupant protection in side impact. However, existing crash dummies and numerical models are not designed to reproduce the kinematics and kinetics of the human shoulder. The purpose of this study was to develop a finite element model of the human shoulder in order to achieve a deeper understanding of the injury mechanisms and the kinematics of the shoulder in side impact. Basic anthropometric data of the human shoulder used to develop the skeletal and muscular portions of this model were taken from commercial data packages. The shoulder model included three bones (the humerus, scapula and clavicle) and major ligaments and muscles around the shoulder.
Technical Paper

Effect of EGR on Autoignition, Combustion, Regulated Emissions and Aldehydes in DI Diesel Engines

2002-03-04
2002-01-1153
In view of the new regulations for diesel engine emissions, EGR is used to reduce the NOx emissions. Diluting the charge with EGR affects the autoignition, combustion as well as the regulated and unregulated emissions of diesel engines, under different operating conditions. This paper presents the results of an investigation on the effect of EGR on the global activation energy and order of the autoignition reactions, premixed and mixing-controlled combustion fractions, the regulated (unburned hydrocarbons, NOx, CO and particulates), aldehydes, CO2 and HC speciation. The experiments were conducted on two different direct injection, four-stroke-cycle, single-cylinder diesel engines over a wide range of operating conditions and EGR ratios.
Technical Paper

Noise Radiation from Axial Flow Fans

1997-05-20
971919
A semi-empirical formula [1] for predicting noise spectra of an engine cooling fan assembly is developed. In deriving this formulation it is assumed that sound radiation from an axial flow fan is primarily due to fluctuating forces exerted on the fan blade surface. These fluctuating forces are correlated to the total lift force exerted on the fan blade, and is approximated by pressure pulses that decay both in space and time. The radiated acoustic pressure is then expressed in terms of superposition of contributions from these pressure pulses, and the corresponding line spectrum is obtained by taking a Fourier series expansion. To simulate the broad band sounds, a normal distribution-like shape function is designed which divides the frequency into consecutive bands centered at the blade passage frequency and its harmonics. The amplitude of this shape function at the center frequency is unity but decays exponentially. The decay rate decreases with an increase in the number of bands.
Technical Paper

Transient Engine and Piston Friction During Starting

1992-10-01
922197
The instantaneous frictional torque (IFT) of the engine and the piston-ring assembly frictional force (PRAFF) were determined during cranking and starting of a direct injection single cylinder diesel engine. The measurements included the cylinder gas pressure, the instantaneous torque of the electric starter, the angular velocity of the crankshaft and the axial force on the connecting rod. The engine and piston friction were determined every crank angle degree for all the cycles from the time the starter was engaged to the time the engine reached the idling speed. The data was analyzed and a comparison was made between the friction in successive cycles.
Technical Paper

Finite Element Modeling of Hybrid III Head-Neck Complex

1992-11-01
922526
A three-dimensional finite element model of the Hybrid III dummy head-neck complex was created to simulate the Amended Part 572 Head-Neck Pendulum Compliance Test, of the Code of Federal Regulations. The model consisted of a rigid head and five circular aluminum disks joined together by butyl elastomer rubber. Contact surfaces were defined to allow the anterior neck to separate upon an application of extension moments. Two mounting positions, one for flexion and the other one for extension, were used to simulate the head-neck calibration tests. An explicit finite element code PAM-CRASH was utilized to simulate the model dynamic responses. Simulation results were compared to experimental data obtained from First Technology Safety Systems Inc. Model predictions agreed well in both flexion and extension. This model can be used to study the head-neck biomechanics of the existing dummy as well as in the development of new dummies.
Technical Paper

Abdominal Injury and Response in Side Impact

1996-11-01
962410
The purpose of this paper is to address abdominal injury and response in cadaver whole body side impacts and abdominal injury risk functions in SID and BIOSID in whole body impacts. Side impact sled tests were performed at Wayne State University using cadavers, SID and BIOSID, with response measured at the shoulder, thorax, abdominal and pelvic levels. The data at the abdominal level are presented here. These data provide further understanding of abdominal tolerance and response in lateral impact and the ability of side impact dummies to predict abdominal injury. In addition, the padding data provide insight into tolerable armrest loads.
Technical Paper

Proposed Provisional Reference Values for the Humerus for Evaluation of Injury Potential

1996-11-01
962416
A humerus provisional reference value (PRV) based on human surrogate data was developed to help evaluate upper arm injury potential. The proposed PRV is based on humerus bone bending moments generated by testing pairs of cadaver arms to fracture in three-point bending on an Instron testing machine in either lateral-medial (L-M) or anterior-posterior (A-P) loading, at 218 mm/s and 0.635 mm/s loading rates. The results were then normalized and scaled to 50th and 5th percentile sized occupants. The normalized average L-M bending moment at failure test result was 6 percent more than the normalized average A-P bending moment. The normalized average L-M shear force at failure was 23 percent higher than the normalized average A-P shear force. The faster rate of loading resulted in a higher average bending moment overall - 8 percent in the L-M and 14 percent in the A-P loading directions.
Technical Paper

Experimental and Analytical Study of Knee Fracture Mechanisms in a Frontal Knee Impact

1996-11-01
962423
The mechanisms of knee fracture were studied experimentally using cadaveric knees and analytically by computer simulation. Ten 90 degree flexed knees were impacted frontally by a 20 kg pendulum with a rigid surface, a 450 psi (3.103 MPa) crush strength and a 100 psi (0.689 MPa) crush strength aluminum honeycomb padding and a 50 psi (0.345 MPa) crush strength paper honeycomb padding at a velocity of about five m/s. During rigid surface impact, a patella fracture and a split condylar fracture were observed. The split condylar fracture was generated by the patella pushing the condyles apart, based on a finite element model using the maximum principal stress as the injury criterion. In the case of the 450 psi aluminum honeycomb padding, the split condylar fracture still occurred, but no patella fractures were observed because the honeycomb provided a more uniform distribution of patella load. No bony fractures in the knee area occurred for impacts with a 50 psi paper honeycomb padding.
Technical Paper

On the Role of Cervical Facet Joints in Rear End Impact Neck Injury Mechanisms

1997-02-24
970497
After a rear end impact, various clinical symptoms are often seen in car occupants (e.g. neck stiffness, strain, headache). Although many different injury mechanisms of the cervical spine have been identified thus far, the extent to which a single mechanism of injury is responsible remains uncertain. Apart from hyperextension or excessive shearing, a compression of the cervical spine can also be seen in the first phase of the impact due to ramping or other mechanical interactions between the seat back and the spine. It is hypothesized that this axial compression, together with the shear force, are responsible for the higher observed frequency of neck injuries in rear end impacts versus frontal impacts of comparable severity. The axial compression first causes loosening of cervical ligaments making it easier for shear type soft tissue injuries to occur.
Technical Paper

Transient Flow Characteristics Inside the Catalytic Converter of a Firing Gasoline Engine

1997-02-24
971014
An experimental study was performed, using cycle-resolved laser Doppler velocimetry (LDV) technique, to characterize the exhaust flow structure inside a catalytic converter retro-fitted to a firing four-cylinder gasoline engine over different operating conditions. A small fraction of titanium (IV) isopropoxide was dissolved in gasoline to generate titanium dioxide during combustion as seeding particles for LDV measurements. It was found that in the front plane of the catalytic monolith, the velocity is highly fluctuating due to the pulsating nature of the engine exhaust flow, which strongly depends on the engine operating conditions. Under unloaded condition, four pairs of major peaks are clearly observed in the time history of the velocity, which correspond to the main exhaust events of each individual cylinder.
Technical Paper

Experimental Determination of the Instantaneous Frictional Torque in Multicylinder Engines

1996-10-01
962006
An experimental method for determining the Instantaneous Frictional Torque (IFT) using pressure transducers on every cylinder and speed measurements at both ends of the crankshaft is presented. The speed variation measured at one end of the crankshaft is distorted by torsional vibrations making it difficult to establish a simple and direct correlation between the acting torque and measured speed. Using a lumped mass model of the crankshaft and modal analysis techniques, the contributions of the different natural modes to the motion along the crankshaft axis are determined. Based on this model a method was devised to combine speed measurements made at both ends of the crankshaft in such a way as to eliminate the influence of torsional vibrations and obtain the equivalent rigid body motion of the crankshaft. This motion, the loading torque and the gas pressure torque are utilized to determine the IFT.
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