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Standard

TESTING OF COMMERCIAL AIRPLANE ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROL SYSTEMS

1997-10-01
HISTORICAL
ARP217C
These recommendations are written to cover the testing of environmental control equipment, functioning as a complete and installed system in civil aircraft for the purpose of: a Demonstrating the safety of the installation and equipment. b Demonstrating proper functioning of the installation and equipment. c Demonstrating performance of the installation and equipment. d Obtaining data for future design and to aid in the analysis of in-service performance of the system and equipment.
Standard

Testing of Airplane Installed Environmental Control Systems (ECS)

1999-03-01
CURRENT
ARP217D
This document deals with ground and flight test of airplane installed Environmental Control Systems (ECS), Figure 1. The ECS provide an environment, controlled within specified operational limits of comfort and safety, for humans, animals, and equipment. These limits include the following: pressure, temperature, humidity, ventilation air velocity, ventilation rate, wall temperature, audible noise, vibration, and environment composition (ozone, contaminants, etc.). The ECS are composed of equipment, controls, and indicators that supply, distribute, recycle and exhaust air to maintain the desired environment.
Standard

Testing of Airplane Installed Environmental Control Systems (Ecs)

1951-03-15
HISTORICAL
ARP217
This document deals with ground and flight test of airplane installed Environmental Control Systems (ECS), Figure 1. The ECS provide an environment, controlled within specified operational limits of comfort and safety, for humans, animals, and equipment. These limits include the following: pressure, temperature, humidity, ventilation air velocity, ventilation rate, wall temperature, audible noise, vibration, and environment composition (ozone, contaminants, etc.). The ECS are composed of equipment, controls, and indicators that supply, distribute, recycle and exhaust air to maintain the desired environment.
Standard

Testing of Airplane Installed Environmental Control Systems (Ecs)

1960-03-01
HISTORICAL
ARP217A
This document deals with ground and flight test of airplane installed Environmental Control Systems (ECS), Figure 1. The ECS provide an environment, controlled within specified operational limits of comfort and safety, for humans, animals, and equipment. These limits include the following: pressure, temperature, humidity, ventilation air velocity, ventilation rate, wall temperature, audible noise, vibration, and environment composition (ozone, contaminants, etc.). The ECS are composed of equipment, controls, and indicators that supply, distribute, recycle and exhaust air to maintain the desired environment.
Standard

TESTING OF COMMERCIAL AIRPLANE ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROL SYSTEMS

1973-10-15
HISTORICAL
ARP217B
These recommendations are written to cover the testing of environmental control equipment, functioning as a complete and installed system in civil aircraft for the purpose of: a Demonstrating the safety of the installation and equipment. b Demonstrating proper functioning of the installation and equipment. c Demonstrating performance of the installation and equipment. d Obtaining data for future design and to aid in the analysis of in-service performance of the system and equipment.
Standard

Valves, Safety, Cabin Air, General Specification For

1999-11-01
HISTORICAL
AS5379
This specification covers the general requirements for cabin air safety valves for use in pressurized cabins of aircraft to prevent excess positive and negative pressures in the cabin and to provide a means of cabin pressure release in case of emergency.
Standard

Valves, Safety, Cabin Air, General Specification For

2011-04-26
CURRENT
AS5379A
This specification covers the general requirements for cabin air safety valves for use in pressurized cabins of aircraft to prevent excess positive and negative pressures in the cabin and to provide a means of cabin pressure release in case of emergency.
Standard

Heater, Aircraft Internal Combustion Heat Exchanger Type

2014-11-23
WIP
AS8040C
This SAE Aerospace Standard (AS) covers combustion heaters used in the following applications: a. Cabin heating (all occupied regions and windshield heating) b. Wing and empennage anti-icing c. Engine and accessory heating (when heater is installed as part of the aircraft) d. Aircraft de-icing
Standard

Heater, Aircraft Internal Combustion Heat Exchanger Type

2013-02-14
CURRENT
AS8040B
This SAE Aerospace Standard (AS) covers combustion heaters used in the following applications: a Cabin heating (all occupied regions and windshield heating) b Wing and empennage anti-icing c Engine and accessory heating (when heater is installed as part of the aircraft) d Aircraft de-icing
Standard

Heater, Aircraft Internal Combustion Heat Exchanger Type

1996-07-01
HISTORICAL
AS8040A
This SAE Aerospace Standard (AS) covers internal combustion heat exchanger type heaters used in the following applications: a) cabin heating (all occupied regions and windshield heating); b) wing and empennage anti-icing; c) engine and accessory heating (when heater is installed as part of the aircraft); d) aircraft de-icing. This document details the minimum safety, performance, design, and testing requirements for internal combustion heaters and certain auxiliary devices that are considered necessary for the utilization of heaters in fixed and rotary wing aircraft. This standard is to be considered currently applicable and necessarily subject to revision from time to time due to advances in the aircraft industry. This standard is based on practical engineering requirements for aircraft heaters currently in use and is applicable to aircraft heaters that shall be developed to meet future requirements.
Standard

Heater, Aircraft Internal Combustion Heat Exchanger Type

1988-02-01
HISTORICAL
AS8040
This SAE Aerospace Standard (AS) covers internal combustion heat exchanger type heaters used in the following applications: a) cabin heating (all occupied regions and windshield heating); b) wing and empennage anti-icing; c) engine and accessory heating (when heater is installed as part of the aircraft); d) aircraft de-icing. This document details the minimum safety, performance, design, and testing requirements for internal combustion heaters and certain auxiliary devices that are considered necessary for the utilization of heaters in fixed and rotary wing aircraft. This standard is to be considered currently applicable and necessarily subject to revision from time to time due to advances in the aircraft industry. This standard is based on practical engineering requirements for aircraft heaters currently in use and is applicable to aircraft heaters that shall be developed to meet future requirements.
Standard

SAE Aerospace Applied Thermodynamics Manual

1992-09-01
CURRENT
AIR1168/V1
The SAE Aerospace Applied Thermodynamics Manual has long been the industry reference on thermodynamics,aerodynamics, heat transfer, fluid dynamics, and materials properties. Reflecting over 1,000 corrections from the previous version, the third edition of this valuable manual is composed of 14 individual paperbound Aerospace Information Reports that are shrinkwrapped as a set.
Standard

Thermophysical Properties of the Natural Environment, Gases, Liquids, and Solids

1991-10-01
HISTORICAL
AIR1168/9
This AIR is arranged in the following four sections: 2A - Properties of the Natural Environment 2B - Properties of Gases 2C - Properties of Liquids 2D - Properties of Solids A summary of each section is given below. Section 2A - This section includes currently applicable earth atmosphere standards (Refs. 101 and 103) and data on the near-Earth environment. Limited data on Mars and Venus reflected solar and planetary-emitted radiation and on micrometeorite data are also included. For space vehicle applications, environmental models are of two general types: orbital and reentry. For orbital models, variable properties such as time and solar flux are usually averaged. Reentry atmospheres are chiefly a function of location and altitude, and selection may be based on reentry location. Variation with latitude is an important local effect (Ref. 106). The electromagnetic solar radiation data in this section are for altitudes above the Earth’s atmosphere.
Standard

Aircraft Fuel Weight Penalty Due to Air Conditioning

2011-07-25
CURRENT
AIR1168/8A
The purpose of this section is to provide methods and a set of convenient working charts to estimate penalty values in terms of take-off fuel weight for any given airplane mission. The curves are for a range of specific fuel consumption (SFC) and lift/drag ratio (L/D) compatible with the jet engines and supersonic aircraft currently being developed. A typical example showing use of the charts for an air conditioning system is given. Evaluation of the penalty imposed on aircraft performance characteristics by the installation of an air conditioning system is important for two reasons: 1 It provides a common denominator for comparing systems in the preliminary design stage, thus aiding in the choice of system to be used. 2 It aids in pinpointing portions of existing systems where design improvements can be most readily achieved.
Standard

Aircraft Fuel Weight Penalty Due to Air Conditioning

1989-09-01
HISTORICAL
AIR1168/8
The purpose of this section is to provide methods and a set of convenient working charts to estimate penalty values in terms of take-off fuel weight for any given airplane mission. The curves are for a range of specific fuel consumption (SFC) and lift/drag ratio (L/D) compatible with the jet engines and supersonic aircraft currently being developed. A typical example showing use of the charts for an air conditioning system is given. Evaluation of the penalty imposed on aircraft performance characteristics by the installation of an air conditioning system is important for two reasons: 1 It provides a common denominator for comparing systems in the preliminary design stage, thus aiding in the choice of system to be used. 2 It aids in pinpointing portions of existing systems where design improvements can be most readily achieved.
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