Refine Your Search

Topic

Author

Affiliation

Search Results

Technical Paper

A Multi-Zone Model for Prediction of HCCI Combustion and Emissions

2000-03-06
2000-01-0327
Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) combustion is a process dominated by chemical kinetics of the fuel-air mixture. The hottest part of the mixture ignites first, and compresses the rest of the charge, which then ignites after a short time lag. Crevices and boundary layers generally remain too cold to react, and result in substantial hydrocarbon and carbon monoxide emissions. Turbulence has little effect on HCCI combustion, and may be most important as a factor in determining temperature gradients and boundary layer thickness inside the cylinder. The importance of thermal gradients inside the cylinder makes it necessary to use an integrated fluid mechanics-chemical kinetics code for accurate predictions of HCCI combustion. However, the use of a fluid mechanics code with detailed chemical kinetics is too computationally intensive for today's computers.
Technical Paper

Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition with Water Injection

1999-03-01
1999-01-0182
The use of water injection in a Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) engine was experimentally investigated. The purpose of this study was to examine whether it is possible to control the ignition timing and slow down the rate of combustion with the use of water injection. The effects of different water flows, air/fuel ratios and inlet pressures were studied for three different fuels, iso-octane, ethanol and natural gas. It is possible to control the ignition timing in a narrow range with the use of water injection, but to the prize of an increase in the already high emissions of unburned hydrocarbons. The CO emission also increased. The NOx emissions, which are very low for HCCI, decreased even more when water injection was applied. The amount of water used was of the magnitude of the fuel flow.
Technical Paper

Interaction Between Turbulence and Flame in an S.I. Engine and in a Stationary Burner

1999-03-01
1999-01-0569
Turbulent flame speeds have been measured in a single cylinder S.I. engine and in a stationary atmospheric burner. One- and two-point LDA has been used to measure turbulence intensities and integral length scales. Stretching, in terms of Karlovitz numbers could be estimated from these measurements. The influence of moving average filtered turbulence on the flame speed in the S.I. engine is in agreement with the burner experiments. Previously reported signs of quenching of small flames in the S.I. engine, due to excessive turbulence could not be found for larger flames.
Technical Paper

Comparison Between In-Cylinder PIV Measurements, CFD Simulations and Steady-Flow Impulse Torque Swirl Meter Measurements

2003-10-27
2003-01-3147
In-cylinder flow measurements, conventional swirl measurements and CFD-simulations have been performed and then compared. The engine studied is a single cylinder version of a Scania D12 that represents a modern heavy-duty truck size engine. Bowditch type optical access and flat piston is used. The cylinder head was also measured in a steady-flow impulse torque swirl meter. From the two-dimensional flow-field, which was measured in the interval from -200° ATDC to 65° ATDC at two different positions from the cylinder head, calculations of the vorticity, turbulence and swirl were made. A maximum in swirl occurs at about 50° before TDC while the maximum vorticity and turbulence occurs somewhat later during the compression stroke. The swirl centre is also seen moving around and it does not coincide with the geometrical centre of the cylinder. The simulated flow-field shows similar behaviour as that seen in the measurements.
Technical Paper

Supercharging HCCI to Extend the Operating Range in a Multi-Cylinder VCR-HCCI Engine

2003-10-27
2003-01-3214
The operating range in terms of speed and load for a natural aspirated Homogenous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) engine is restricted by a lack of dilution at high load and a poor combustion at low load. Today HCCI is seen as a part load concept, but the operating range for vehicle applications should at least cover contemporary driving cycles, without switching to a conventional Spark Ignited (SI) combustion mode. Dilution with air at high load can be increased by supercharging, but with the drawback of parasitic losses or pumping losses decreasing the brake efficiency and by that one of the benefits of HCCI. The effect of advancing the combustion phasing and throttling the inlet air on the combustion efficiency at zero loads is investigated. The combustion efficiency increases drastically in both cases. The increase in the combustion efficiency overcomes the drawbacks of the early combustion phasing in the first case and the pumping losses in the second case.
Technical Paper

Ion Current Sensing for HCCI Combustion Feedback

2003-10-27
2003-01-3216
Measurement of ion current signal from HCCI combustion was performed. The aim of the work was to investigate if a measurable ion current signal exists and if it is possible to obtain useful information about the combustion process. Furthermore, influence of mixture quality in terms of air/fuel ratio and EGR on the ion current signal was studied. A conventional spark plug was used as ionization sensor. A DC voltage (85 Volt) was applied across the electrode gap. By measuring the current through the gap the state of the gas can be probed. A comparison between measured pressure and ion current signal was performed, and dynamic models were estimated by using system identification methods. The study shows that an ion current signal can be obtained from HCCI combustion and that the signal level is very sensitive to the fuel/air equivalence ratio.
Technical Paper

Pressure Oscillations During Rapid HCCI Combustion

2003-10-27
2003-01-3217
This work has focused on studying the in-cylinder pressure fluctuations caused by rapid HCCI combustion and determine what they consist of. Inhomogeneous autoignition sets up pressure waves traversing the combustion chamber. These pressure waves induce high gas velocities which causes increased heat transfer to the walls or in worst case engine damage. In order to study the pressure fluctuations a number of pressure transducers were mounted in the combustion chamber. The multi transducer arrangement was such that six transducers were placed circumferentially, one placed near the centre and one at a slight offset in the combustion chamber. The fitting of six transducers circumferentially was enabled by a spacer design and the two top mounted transducers were fitted in a modified cylinder head. During testing a disc shaped combustion chamber was used. The results of the tests conducted were that the in-cylinder pressure experienced during rapid HCCI-combustion is inhomogeneous.
Technical Paper

Simultaneous OH- and Formaldehyde-LIF Measurements in an HCCI Engine

2003-10-27
2003-01-3218
Simultaneous OH- and formaldehyde LIF measurements have been performed in an HCCI engine using two laser sources working on 283 and 355 nm, respectively. Two ICCD camera systems, equipped with long-pass filters, were used to collect the LIF signals. The simultaneous images of OH and formaldehyde were compared with heat-release calculated from the pressure-trace matching the cycle for the LIF measurements. The measurements were performed on a 0.5 l single-cylinder optical engine equipped with port-fuel injection system. A blend of iso-octane and n-heptane was used as fuel and the compression ratio was set to 12:1. The width of the laser sheet was 40 mm and hence covered approximately half of the cylinder bore. At some 20 CAD BTDC low temperature reactions is present and formaldehyde is formed. The formaldehyde signal is then rather constant until the main heat-release starts just before TDC, where the signal decreases rapidly to low values.
Technical Paper

Balancing Cylinder-to-Cylinder Variations in a Multi-Cylinder VCR-HCCI Engine

2004-06-08
2004-01-1897
Combustion initiation in an HCCI engine is dependent of several parameters that are not easily controlled like the temperature and pressure history in the cylinder. So achieving the same ignition condition in all the cylinders in a multi-cylinder engine is difficult. Factors as gas exchange, compression ratio, cylinder cooling, fuel supply, and inlet air temperature can differ from cylinder-to-cylinder. These differences cause both combustion phasing and load variations between the cylinders, which in the end affect the engine performance. Operating range in terms of speed and load is also affected by the cylinder imbalance, since misfiring or too fast combustion in the worst cylinders limits the load. The cylinder-to-cylinder variations are investigated in a multi-cylinder Variable Compression Ratio (VCR) engine, and the effect it has on the engine performance.
Technical Paper

Operating range in a Multi Cylinder HCCI engine using Variable Compression Ratio

2003-05-19
2003-01-1829
Homogenous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) is a promising part load combustion concept for future power train applications. Different approaches to achieve and control HCCI combustion are today investigated and compared, especially concerning operating range. The HCCI operating range for vehicle applications should at least cover contemporary emissions drive cycles. The operating range in terms of speed and load is investigated with a Naturally Aspirated (NA) four-stroke multi-cylinder engine with Port Fuel Injection (PFI). HCCI combustion control is achieved with Variable Compression Ratio (VCR) and inlet air preheating with exhaust heat. Both primary reference fuels and commercial gasoline are used in the tests. HCCI combustion with commercial gasoline is achieved over a load range from 0 to 3.6bar BMEP, and over a speed range from 1000 to 5000rpm. Maximum load is at 1000rpm and decreases with an approximately straight slope to zero at 5000rpm.
Technical Paper

HCCI Combustion Phasing with Closed-Loop Combustion Control Using Variable Compression Ratio in a Multi Cylinder Engine

2003-05-19
2003-01-1830
This study applies Closed-Loop Combustion Control (CLCC) using Variable Compression Ratio (VCR) and cylinder balancing using variable lambda to solve the problem. Step changes of set points for combustion phasing, Compression Ratio (CR), and load together with ramps of engine speed and inlet air temperature are investigated. Performances of the controllers are investigated by running the engine at either a constant amount of injected fuel corresponding to an approximate load of 1.5 or 2.5 bar BMEP and/or constant speed of 2000 rpm. Commercial RON 92 gasoline is used in the test. The CLCC is found to be fast and effective and has a potential of handling step changes in a matter of cycles, while the speed and temperature ramps need some more optimization of the CLCC. The CR controller is very fast and has a time constant corresponding to three engine cycles at 2000 rpm.
Technical Paper

Lean Burn Natural Gas Operation vs. Stoichiometric Operation with EGR and a Three Way Catalyst

2005-04-11
2005-01-0250
Exhaust Emissions from lean burn natural gas engines may not always be as low as the potential permits, especially engines with open loop lambda control. These engines can produce much higher emissions than a comparable diesel engine without exhaust gas after treatment. Even if the engine has closed loop lambda control, emissions are often unacceptably high for future emission regulations. A three way catalyst is, today, the best way to reduce hazardous emissions. The drawback is that the engine has to operate with a stoichiometric mixture and this leads to; higher heat losses, higher pumping work at low to medium loads, higher thermal stress on the engine and higher knock tendency (requiring lower compression ratio, and thus lower brake efficiency). One way to reduce these drawbacks is to dilute the stoichiometric mixture with EGR. This paper compares lean burn operation with operation at stoichiometric conditions diluted with EGR, and using a three way catalyst.
Technical Paper

Demonstrating the Multi Fuel Capability of a Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition Engine with Variable Compression Ratio

1999-10-25
1999-01-3679
The potential of a Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) engine with variable compression ratio has been experimentally investigated. The experiments were carried out in a single cylinder engine, equipped with a modified cylinder head. Altering the position of a secondary piston in the cylinder head enabled a change of the compression ratio. The secondary piston was controlled by a hydraulic system, which was operated from the control room. Dual port injection systems were used, which made it possible to change the ratio of two different fuels with the engine running. By mixing iso-octane with octane number 100 and normal heptane with octane number 0, it was possible to obtain any octane rating between 0 and 100. By using an electrical heater for the inlet air, it was possible to adjust the inlet air temperature to a selected value.
Technical Paper

A Study of the Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition Combustion Process by Chemiluminescence Imaging

1999-10-25
1999-01-3680
An experimental study of the Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) combustion process has been conducted by using chemiluminescence imaging. The major intent was to characterize the flame structure and its transient behavior. To achieve this, time resolved images of the naturally emitted light were taken. Emitted light was studied by recording its spectral content and applying different filters to isolate species like OH and CH. Imaging was enabled by a truck-sized engine modified for optical access. An intensified digital camera was used for the imaging. Some imaging was done using a streak-camera, capable of taking eight arbitrarily spaced pictures during a single cycle, thus visualizing the progress of the combustion process. All imaging was done with similar operating conditions and a mixture of n-heptane and iso-octane was used as fuel. Some 20 crank angles before Top Dead Center (TDC), cool flames were found to exist.
Technical Paper

The Effect of Fuel Volatility on HCCI Using Simultaneous Formaldehyde and OH PLIF

2004-10-25
2004-01-2948
Simultaneous formaldehyde and OH PLIF have been applied in a direct-injected HCCI engine. The engine is a 0.5 l single-cylinder optical engine equipped with EGR system. PLIF measurements were performed with the engine run with two different fuels of low and high volatility, respectively. Different ratios of EGR were also examined. The aim of the study was to investigate how fuels with different volatility and EGR affect the HCCI combustion and measurements were performed for early and late injection timings. Measurements are presented for different injection timings showing formaldehyde and OH from start of injection until late in the expansion stroke. Also, formaldehyde distributions obtained from after the low temperature regime and before the high temperature regime are studied for different tuning of the start of injection from 300CAD to 20CAD before top dead center.
Technical Paper

Optical Diagnostics of HCCI and Low-Temperature Diesel Using Simultaneous 2-D PLIF of OH and Formaldehyde

2004-10-25
2004-01-2949
Simultaneous OH- and formaldehyde planar-LIF measurements have been performed in an optical engine using two laser sources working on 283 and 355 nm, respectively. The engine used for the measurements was a car Diesel engine converted to single-cylinder operation and modified for optical access. The fuel, n-heptane, was injected by a direct injection common rail system and the engine was also fitted with an EGR system. The engine was operated in both HCCI mode and Diesel mode. Due to the low load, the Diesel mode resulted in low-temperature Diesel combustion and because of limitations in maximum pressure and maximum rate of pressure increase of the optical engine, the Diesel mode was run at a higher EGR percentage than the HCCI mode to slow down the combustion. A third mode, pilot combustion, was also investigated. This pilot combustion is created by an injection at 30 CAD before TDC followed by a second injection just before TDC.
Technical Paper

Start of Injection Strategies for HCCI-combustion

2004-10-25
2004-01-2990
Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) has a great potential for low NOx emissions but problems with emissions of unburned hydrocarbons (HC). One way of reducing the HC is to use direct injection. The purpose of this paper is to present experimental data on the trade off between NOx and HC. Injection timing, injection pressure and nozzle configuration all effect homogeneity of the mixture and thus the NOx and HC emissions. The engine studied is a single cylinder version of a Scania D12 that represents a modern heavy-duty truck size engine. A common rail (CR) system has been used to control injection pressure and timing. The combustion using injectors with different nozzle hole diameters and spray angle, both colliding and non-colliding, has been studied. The NOx emission level changes with start of injection (SOI) and the levels are low for early injection timing, increasing with retarded SOI. Different injectors produce different NOx levels.
Technical Paper

NOx and N2O formation in HCCI engines

2005-04-11
2005-01-0126
Calculations using homogeneous and stochastic reactor models were performed in order to find an explanation to observed properties of NOx HCCI engines. It was found that for moderate NOx levels, N2O reactions play an important role in the NOx formation. Further, the high proportions of NO2 found in from some HCCI engines is due to high temperature inhomogeneities, poor mixing and slow overall combustion. N2O is often emitted from HCCI combustion. The levels of NOx in the exhausts are highly sensitive to temperature; however N2O has a weak negative dependence on temperature. While fuel rich operation naturally leads to high temperatures and thus high NOx levels; once the temperature effects are decoupled the fuel rich conditions themselves has a favorable effect on low-NOx engine operation.
Technical Paper

Operating Conditions Using Spark Assisted HCCI Combustion During Combustion Mode Transfer to SI in a Multi-Cylinder VCR-HCCI Engine

2005-04-11
2005-01-0109
The Homogenous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) operating range in terms of speed and load does not cover contemporary driving cycles, e.g. the European driving cycle EC2000, without increased engine displacement, supercharging, or without excessive noise and high NOx emissions. Hence, the maximum achievable load with HCCI is too low for high load vehicle operation and a combustion mode transfer from HCCI to spark ignited (SI) has to be done. At some operating conditions spark assisted HCCI combustion is possible, which makes a mixed combustion mode and controlled combustion mode transfers possible. The mixed combustion region and the operating conditions are investigated in this paper from lean SI limit to pure HCCI without SI assistance. Parameters as compression ratio, inlet air pressure, inlet air temperature, and lambda are used for controlling the mixed combustion mode. A strategy for closed-loop combustion mode transfer is discussed.
Technical Paper

Optical Diagnostics of HCCI and UNIBUS Using 2-D PLIF of OH and Formaldehyde

2005-04-11
2005-01-0175
Simultaneous OH- and formaldehyde planar-LIF measurements have been performed in an optical engine using two laser sources working on 283 and 355 nm, respectively. The measurements were performed in a light duty Diesel engine, using n-heptane as fuel, converted to single-cylinder operation and modified for optical access. It was also equipped with a direct injection common rail system as well as an EGR system. The engine was operated in both HCCI mode, using a single fuel injection, and UNIBUS (Uniform Bulky Combustion System) mode, using two injections of fuel with one of the injections at 50 CAD before TDC and the other one just before TDC. The OH and formaldehyde LIF images were compared with the heat-release calculated from the pressure-traces. Analyses of the emissions, for example NOx and HC, were also performed for the different operating conditions.
X