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Technical Paper

Applying Representative Interactive Flamelets (RIF) with Special Emphasis on Pollutant Formation to Simulate a DI Diesel Engine with Roof-Shaped Combustion Chamber and Tumble Charge Motion

2007-04-16
2007-01-0167
Combustion and pollutant formation in a new recently introduced Common-Rail DI Diesel engine concept with roof-shaped combustion chamber and tumble charge motion are numerically investigated using the Representative Interactive Flamelet concept (RIF). A reference case with a cup shaped piston bowl for full load operating conditions is considered in detail. In addition to the reference case, three more cases are investigated with a variation of start of injection (SOI). A surrogate fuel consisting of n-decane (70% liquid volume fraction) and α-methylnaphthalene (30% liquid volume fraction) is used in the simulation. The underlying complete reaction mechanism comprises 506 elementary reactions and 118 chemical species. Special emphasis is put on pollutant formation, in particular on the formation of NOx, where a new technique based on a three-dimensional transport equation within the flamelet framework is applied.
Technical Paper

Evaluation of Modeling Approaches for NOx Formation in a Common-Rail DI Diesel Engine within the Framework of Representative Interactive Flamelets (RIF)

2008-04-14
2008-01-0971
Representative Interactive Flamelets (RIF) have proven successful in predicting Diesel engine combustion. The RIF concept is based on the assumption that chemistry is fast compared to the smallest turbulent time scales, associated with the turnover time of a Kolmogorov eddy. The assumption of fast chemistry may become questionable with respect to the prediction of pollutant formation; the formation of NOx, for example, is a rather slow process. For this reason, three different approaches to account for NOx emissions within the flamelet approach are presented and discussed in this study. This includes taking the pollutant mass fractions directly from the flamelet equations, a technique based on a three-dimensional transport equation as well as the extended Zeldovich mechanism. Combustion and pollutant emissions in a Common-Rail DI Diesel engine are numerically investigated using the RIF concept. Special emphasis is put on NOx emissions.
Journal Article

Applying an Extended Flamelet Model for a Multiple Injection Operating Strategy in a Common-Rail DI Diesel Engine

2009-04-20
2009-01-0720
Subject of this work is the recently introduced extended Representative Interactive Flamelet (RIF) model for multiple injections. First, the two-dimensional laminar flamelet equations, which can describe the transfer of heat and mass between two-interacting mixture fields, are presented. This is followed by a description of the various mixture fraction and mixture fraction variance equations that are required for the RIF model extension accounting for multiple injection events. Finally, the modeling strategy for multiple injection events is described: Different phases of combustion and interaction between the mixture fields resulting from different injections are identified. Based on this, the extension of the RIF model to describe any number of injections is explained. Simulation results using the extended RIF model are compared against experimental data for a Common-Rail DI Diesel engine that was operated with three injection pulses.
Technical Paper

Modelling the Effect of Split Injections in Diesel Engines Using Representative Interactive Flamelets

1999-10-25
1999-01-3547
A major problem in reducing pollutant emissions from diesel engines is the soot-NOx trade-off. With the introduction of the Common-Rail injection system splitting the injection into separate pulses has become possible. Experiments using multiple injections indicated that there is the chance to shift the soot-NOx curve closer to the origin. In order to understand the underlying physical process multidimensional simulations have been carried out for a baseline as well as a split injection case using the Representative Interactive Flamelet (RIF)-Model. The computations are compared to experimental data showing good agreement for both cases. The computations as well as the experiments confirm the possibility of reducing soot with only a slight increase in NOx emissions. It is shown that soot is reduced due to a different mixing process resulting in fewer rich regions.
Technical Paper

Differences between Iso-Octane and Methane during Wall Quenching with Respect to HC Emissions

2000-10-16
2000-01-2807
Quenching of premixed flames at cold walls is investigated to study the importance of the model fuel choice for combustion modeling. Detailed chemical mechanisms for two different fuels, namely the low-molecular-weight fuel methane, and the more complex fuel iso-octane are employed. For both fuels the response of the flame to the very rapid heat loss at the cold wall is studied. The most important and significant difference between methane and iso-octane for this problem is the postquench oxidation of unburned hydrocarbons. Methane shows fast oxidation of unburned fuel and intermediate hydrocarbons whereas postquench oxidation for iso-octane is slow especially for the intermediate hydrocarbons. Furthermore, the Soret effect which is usually considered to be of minor importance appears to be important in modeling the rate limiting diffusion process. This is caused by different directions of the thermal diffusive transport for certain species.
Technical Paper

Modeling DI-Diesel Combustion using the Eulerian Particle Flamelet Model (EPFM)

2000-10-16
2000-01-2934
Combustion and pollutant formation in a DI-Diesel engine are numerically investigated using the Eulerian Particle Flamelet Model (EPFM). A baseline case for part load operating conditions is considered as well as an EGR variation. The surrogate fuel consisting of n-decane (70% liquid volume fraction) and α-methylnaphthalene (30% liquid volume fraction) is used in the simulation. Results are compared to experimental data that has been obtained using real diesel fuel. The effect of multiple flamelets on the simulation of the auto-ignition process and the pollutant formation is discussed and a converging behavior of the model with respect to the number of flamelets is found. The effect of homogenization of the three-dimensional mixture field is investigated and it has been included in the formulation of the scalar dissipation rate.
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