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Journal Article

A Study into the Mechanical Behavior of Adhesively-Bonded Jute Fiber-Reinforced Composite

Abstract Rapid progress in the interdisciplinary field of automotive engineering and the pressing need for an environmental friendly alternative to metal and synthetic fiber-reinforced composites for vehicle structure have triggered recent research in the field of natural fiber-based composites. Their potential advantages are attributed to their light weight, low cost and biodegradability. However, their usage in present day automotive systems is restricted due a lower magnitude range of mechanical properties and limited study in this area. In contrast to mechanical joints, the adhesively bonded joints aid in reducing stress concentration, joining of dissimilar materials, corrosion prevention, weight reduction and a smoother finish. Thus, in the present study, failure load, and mean shear stress of single lap shear and double lap shear joints as a function of joint overlap length, are evaluated using a two part epoxy adhesive made by Huntsman.
Technical Paper

Use of Truncated Finite Element Modeling for Efficient Design Optimization of an Automotive Front End Structure

The present work is concerned with the objective of multi disciplinary design optimization (MDO) of an automotive front end structure using truncated finite element model. A truncated finite element model of a real world vehicle is developed and its efficacy for use in design optimization is demonstrated. The main goal adopted here is minimizing the weight of the front end structure meeting NVH, durability and crash safety targets. Using the Response Surface Method (RSM) and the Design Of Experiments (DOE) technique, second order polynomial response surfaces are generated for prediction of the structural performance parameters such as lowest modal frequency, fatigue life, and peak deceleration value.
Journal Article

A Comparison of the Behaviors of Steel and GFRP Hat-Section Components under Axial Quasi-Static and Impact Loading

Abstract Hat-sections, single and double, made of steel are frequently encountered in automotive body structural components. These components play a significant role in terms of impact energy absorption during vehicle crashes thereby protecting occupants of vehicles from severe injury. However, with the need for higher fuel economy and for compliance to stringent emission norms, auto manufacturers are looking for means to continually reduce vehicle body weight either by employing lighter materials like aluminum and fiber-reinforced plastics, or by using higher strength steel with reduced gages, or by combinations of these approaches. Unlike steel hat-sections which have been extensively reported in published literature, the axial crushing behavior of hat-sections made of fiber-reinforced composites may not have been adequately probed.