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Standard

Electrostatic Discharge Test for Vehicles

1995-07-01
CURRENT
J1595_199507
This SAE Information Report defines the test methods and specifications for electrostatic discharge sensitivity of passenger cars, multipurpose passenger vehicles, trucks and buses.
Standard

Electrostatic Discharge Test for Vehicles

1988-10-01
HISTORICAL
J1595_198810
This SAE Information Report defines the test methods and specifications for electrostatic discharge sensitivity of passenger cars, multipurpose passenger vehicles, trucks and buses.
Standard

Vehicle Electromagnetic Radiated Susceptibility Testing Using a LargeTEM Cell

1995-07-01
CURRENT
J1407_199507
This information report gives the procedures for use and operation of a large transverse electromagnetic (TEM) mode cell for the determination of electromagnetic (EM) radiated susceptibility of equipment, subystems and systems (whose dimensions are less than 3 m x 6 m x 18 m) in the frequency range 10 kHz - 20 MHz. Several large TEM cells have been designed and constructed by various organizations for EMP and high power CW testing. Two cell designs and associated instrumentation are included for example purposes in this report. Other cell configurations have also been constructed. Users should consult the literature before undertaking a project of this magnitude for other cell and instrumentation designs.
Standard

Vehicle Electromagnetic Radiated Susceptibility Testing Using a Large Tem Cell

1988-03-01
HISTORICAL
J1407_198803
This information report gives the procedures for use and operation of a large transverse electromagnetic (TEM) mode cell for the determination of electromagnetic (EM) radiated susceptibility of equipment, subystems and systems (whose dimensions are less than 3 m x 6 m x 18 m) in the frequency range 10 kHz - 20 MHz. Several large TEM cells have been designed and constructed by various organizations for EMP and high power CW testing. Two cell designs and associated instrumentation are included for example purposes in this report. Other cell configurations have also been constructed. Users should consult the literature before undertaking a project of this magnitude for other cell and instrumentation designs.
Standard

Anechoic Test Facility Radiated Susceptibility 20 Mhz - 18 Ghz Electromagnetic Field

1987-01-01
HISTORICAL
J1507_198701
This information report gives typical requirements for an anechoic chamber in which the system susceptibility of an operating motor vehicle to electromagnetic fields can be determined in the frequency range of 20 MHz to 18 GHz. Because of the large cone sizes required for 20 MHz cut-off, several anechoic facilities have been designed with lower cut-off frequencies of 200 MHz or greater. Testing below cut-off is then accomplished using customized antennas at reduced accuracy. Users should carefully review their testing requirements before undertaking the construction of a test facility the magnitude of an anechoic chamber. Other test approaches include, but are not limited to, open field testing per SAE J1338 and mode stirred reverberation chambers.
Standard

Anechoic Test Facility Radiated Susceptibility 20 MHz to 18 GHz Electromagnetic Field

1995-07-01
CURRENT
J1507_199507
This information report gives typical requirements for an anechoic chamber in which the system susceptibility of an operating motor vehicle to electromagnetic fields can be determined in the frequency range of 20 MHz to 18 GHz. Because of the large cone sizes required for 20 MHz cut-off, several anechoic facilities have been designed with lower cut-off frequencies of 200 MHz or greater. Testing below cut-off is then accomplished using customized antennas at reduced accuracy. Users should carefully review their testing requirements before undertaking the construction of a test facility the magnitude of an anechoic chamber. Other test approaches include, but are not limited to, open field testing per SAE J1338 and mode stirred reverberation chambers.
Standard

Immunity to Radiated Electromagnetic Fields; 10 kHz to 200 MHz--Crawford TEM Cell and 10 kHz to 5 GHz--Wideband TEM Cell

2006-10-06
HISTORICAL
J1113/24_200610
This part of SAE J1113 specifies TEM cell test methods and procedures for testing the electromagnetic immunity of electronic components (DUTs) for passenger cars, commercial vehicles and similar applications. Methods using the constant cross-section TEM cell (Crawford TEM) and the flared cross-section TEM cell (wideband TEM) are discussed in the document. The electromagnetic disturbance considered in this part of SAE J1113 will be limited to continuous narrowband electromagnetic fields. TEM cells produce both electric and magnetic fields simultaneously. The test is directly applicable to DUTs whose height is less than 1/3 the septum height; somewhat larger modules can be tested with conditions applied. The Crawford TEM and wideband TEM cell may be used for testing within the 1/3 height condition without demonstrating field uniformity within the cell, if the test set-up complies with the other provisions of this standard. This test can be used for two purposes: a.
Standard

Immunity to Radiated Electromagnetic Fields; 10 Khz to 200 Mhz--Crawford Tem Cell and 10 Khz to 5 Ghz--Wideband Tem Cell

2000-05-01
HISTORICAL
J1113/24_200005
This part of SAE J1113 specifies TEM cell test methods and procedures for testing the electromagnetic immunity of electronic components (DUTs) for passenger cars, commercial vehicles and similar applications. Methods using the constant cross-section TEM cell (Crawford TEM) and the flared cross-section TEM cell (wideband TEM) are discussed in the document. The electromagnetic disturbance considered in this part of SAE J1113 will be limited to continuous narrowband electromagnetic fields. TEM cells produce both electric and magnetic fields simultaneously. The test is directly applicable to DUTs whose height is less than 1/3 the septum height; somewhat larger modules can be tested with conditions applied. The Crawford TEM and wideband TEM cell may be used for testing within the 1/3 height condition without demonstrating field uniformity within the cell, if the test set-up complies with the other provisions of this standard. This test can be used for two purposes: a.
Standard

Electromagnetic Compatibility Measurement Procedure for Vehicle Components - Immunity to Radiated Electromagnetic Fields, 10 Khz to 200 Mhz, Strip Line Method

2002-10-31
CURRENT
J1113/23_200210
This SAE Recommended Practice covers the recommended testing techniques for the determination of electric field immunity of an automotive electronic device. This technique uses a strip line{sup}1 from 10 kHz to 200 MHz and is limited to exposing the harnesses (and/or devices) which have a maximum height of equal to or less than 1/3 the strip line height. When J1113-23 was released in 1995, a note was included in the scope regarding the expected life of the document which stated: "This method is being replaced by the Tri-plate Line (SAE J1113-25) which is considered to be a superior method. It will be retained for historical purposes for a period of five years where upon it will be considered to be withdrawn." The committee decided in August 2001 to ballot this document for cancellation.
Standard

Electromagnetic Compatibility Measurement Procedure for Vehicle Components-Immunity to Ac Power Line Electric Fields

1995-09-01
HISTORICAL
J1113/26_199509
This SAE Recommended Practice covers the recommended testing techniques for the determination of electric field immunity of an automotive electronic device when the device and its wiring harness is exposed to a power line electric field. This technique uses a parallel plate field generator and a high voltage, low current voltage source to produce the field.
Standard

Electromagnetic Compatibility Measurement Procedure for Vehicle Components--Immunity to Radiated Electromagnetic Fields, 10 KHz to 1000 MHz--Tri-Plate Line Method

2005-07-11
CURRENT
J1113/25_200507
This procedure covers the recommended testing techniques for the determination of radiated immunity of an automotive electronic device. This technique uses a Tri-Plate Line (TPL) operating over a frequency range from 10 KHz to 1000 MHz. This technique is limited to components which have a maximum height of equal to or less than 1/3 the height between the driven element and the outer, ground plates. A TPL, a variation of a TEM cell design, is constructed without sides to the cell. The primary advantage to the use of the TPL as opposed to a TEM cell is that its construction permits large devices to be placed within the cell with their associated cables attached without special feed through ports or adapters as required for a TEM cell. The lack of sides which would be found in a TEM cell permits easy routing of the cables to and from the Equipment Under Test (DUT). The TPL does not have a serious problem with fields reflected from the side walls as does with the TEM cell.
Standard

Electromagnetic Compatibility Measurement Procedure for Vehicle Components--Immunity to AC Power Line Electric Fields

2001-07-30
HISTORICAL
J1113/26_200107
This SAE Recommended Practice covers the recommended testing techniques for the determination of electric field immunity of an automotive electronic device when the device and its wiring harness is exposed to a power line electric field. This technique uses a parallel plate field generator and a high voltage, low current voltage source to produce the field.
Standard

Electromagnetic Compatibility Measurements Procedure for Vehicle Components-- Part 27--Immunity to Radiated Electromagnetic Fields--Mode Stir Reverberation Method

1995-02-01
HISTORICAL
J1113/27_199502
Vehicle electrical/electronic systems may be affected when immersed in an electromagnetic field generated by sources such as radio and TV broadcast stations, radar and communication sites, mobile transmitters, cellular phones, etc. Reverberation method is used to evaluate the immunity of electronic devices in the frequency range of 500 MHz to 2.0 GHz, with possible extensions to 200 MHz to 10 GHz. At a later date, pulse modulation capability will be added for testing above 1 GHz. This document provides the component design and test engineers with a test procedure and the performance requirements necessary to evaluate the immunity of electronic devices to radiated electromagnetic fields early in the design stage as well as pilot and production stages. Ensuring electromagnetic compatibility early in the development stage will minimize costly changes later in the program and will prevent excessive component level hardening during full-vehicle level testing.
Standard

Electromagnetic Compatibility Measurement Procedure for Vehicle Components--Immunity to Radiated Electromagnetic Fields, 10 kZz to 500 MNz--Tri-Plate Line Method

1995-09-01
HISTORICAL
J1113/25_199509
This procedure covers the recommended testing techniques for the determination of electric field immunity of an automotive electronic device. This technique uses a tri-plate line (TPL) from 10 kHz to 500 MHz and is limited to components which have a maximum height of equal to or less than 1/3 the height between the driven element and the outer, grounded plates. A tri-plate line is a variation of a TEM cell design which is constructed without sides to the cell. The TPL sets up a region of uniform electric and magnetic fields between the center septum and the top and bottom grounded plates. One advantage to the use of the TPL as opposed to a TEM cell is that the construction permits large devices to be placed within the cell with their associated cables attached without special feed through ports or adapters as required for a TEM cell. The lack of sides which would be found in a TEM cell permits easy routing of the cables to and from the equipment under test (EUT).
Standard

Electromagnetic Compatibility Measurement Procedure for Vehicle Components-Immunity to Radiated Electromagnetic Fields, 10 Khz to 1000 Mhz-Tri-Plate Line Method

1999-02-01
HISTORICAL
J1113/25_199902
This procedure covers the recommended testing techniques for the determination of radiated immunity of an automotive electronic device. This technique uses a Tri-Plate Line (TPL) operating over a frequency range from 10 KHz to 1000 MHz. This technique is limited to components which have a maximum height of equal to or less than 1/3 the height between the driven element and the outer, ground plates. A TPL, a variation of a TEM cell design, is constructed without sides to the cell. The primary advantage to the use of the TPL as opposed to a TEM cell is that its construction permits large devices to be placed within the cell with their associated cables attached without special feed through ports or adapters as required for a TEM cell. The lack of sides which would be found in a TEM cell permits easy routing of the cables to and from the Equipment Under Test (DUT). The TPL does not have a serious problem with fields reflected from the side walls as does with the TEM cell.
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