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SAE Electric Vehicle Inductively Coupled Charging

1999-11-02
HISTORICAL
J1773_199911
This SAE Recommended Practice establishes the minimum interface compatibility requirements for electric vehicle (EV) inductively coupled charging for North America. This part of the specification is applicable to manually connected inductive charging for Levels 1 and 2 power transfer. Requirements for Level 3 compatibility are contained in Appendix B. Recommended software interface messaging requirements are contained in Appendix A. This type of inductively coupled charging is generally intended for transferring power at frequencies significantly higher than power line frequencies. This part of the specification is not applicable to inductive coupling schemes that employ automatic connection methods or that are intended for transferring power at power line frequencies. in the charge coupler). The charge controller signals the charger to stop charging when it determines that the batteries are completely charged or a fault is detected during the charging process.
Standard

SAE Electric Vehicle Inductively Coupled Charging

2014-06-05
CURRENT
J1773_201406
This SAE Recommended Practice establishes the minimum interface compatibility requirements for electric vehicle (EV) inductively coupled charging for North America. This part of the specification is applicable to manually connected inductive charging for Levels 1 and 2 power transfer. Requirements for Level 3 compatibility are contained in Appendix B. Recommended software interface messaging requirements are contained in Appendix A. This type of inductively coupled charging is generally intended for transferring power at frequencies significantly higher than power line frequencies. This part of the specification is not applicable to inductive coupling schemes that employ automatic connection methods or that are intended for transferring power at power line frequencies.
Standard

SAE Electric Vehicle Inductively Coupled Charging

2009-05-28
HISTORICAL
J1773_200905
This SAE Recommended Practice establishes the minimum interface compatibility requirements for electric vehicle (EV) inductively coupled charging for North America. This part of the specification is applicable to manually connected inductive charging for Levels 1 and 2 power transfer. Requirements for Level 3 compatibility are contained in Appendix B. Recommended software interface messaging requirements are contained in Appendix A. This type of inductively coupled charging is generally intended for transferring power at frequencies significantly higher than power line frequencies. This part of the specification is not applicable to inductive coupling schemes that employ automatic connection methods or that are intended for transferring power at power line frequencies. in the charge coupler). The charge controller signals the charger to stop charging when it determines that the batteries are completely charged or a fault is detected during the charging process.
Standard

Energy Transfer System for Electric Vehicles - Part 2: Communication Requirements and Network Architecture

2014-02-26
CURRENT
J2293/2_201402
SAE J2293 establishes requirements for Electric Vehicles (EV) and the off-board Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) used to transfer electrical energy to an EV from an Electric Utility Power System (Utility) in North America. This document defines, either directly or by reference, all characteristics of the total EV Energy Transfer System (EV-ETS) necessary to insure the functional interoperability of an EV and EVSE of the same physical system architecture. The ETS, regardless of architecture, is responsible for the conversion of AC electrical energy into DC electrical energy that can be used to charge the Storage Battery of an EV, as shown in Figure 1. The different physical ETS system architectures are identified by the form of the energy that is transferred between the EV and the EVSE, as shown in Figure 2. It is possible for an EV and EVSE to support more than one architecture.
Standard

Energy Transfer System for Electric Vehicles - Part 2: Communication Requirements and Network Architecture

2008-07-08
HISTORICAL
J2293/2_200807
SAE J2293 establishes requirements for Electric Vehicles (EV) and the off-board Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) used to transfer electrical energy to an EV from an electric Utility Power System (Utility) in North America. this document defines, either directly or by reference, all characteristics of the total EV Energy Transfer System (EV-ETS) necessary to insure the functional interoperability of an EV and EVSE of the same physical system architecture. The ETS, regardless of architecture, is responsible for the conversion of AC electrical energy into DC electrical energy that can be used to charge the Storage Battery of an EV, as shown in Figure 1. The different physical ETS system architectures are identified by the form of the energy that is transferred etween the EV and the EVSE, as shown in figure 2. It is possible for an EV and EVSE to support more than one architecture.
Standard

Energy Transfer System for Electric Vehicles - Part 1: Functional Requirements and System Architectures

2014-02-26
CURRENT
J2293/1_201402
SAE J2293 establishes requirements for Electric Vehicles (EV) and the off-board Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) used to transfer electrical energy to an EV from an Electric Utility Power System (Utility) in North America. This document defines, either directly or by reference, all characteristics of the total EV Energy Transfer System (EV-ETS) necessary to insure the functional interoperability of an EV and EVSE of the same physical system architecture. The ETS, regardless of architecture, is responsible for the conversion of AC electrical energy into DC electrical energy that can be used to charge the Storage Battery of an EV, as shown in Figure 1. The different physical ETS system architectures are identified by the form of the energy that is transferred between the EV and the EVSE, as shown in Figure 2. It is possible for an EV and EVSE to support more than one architecture.
Standard

Energy Transfer System for Electric Vehicles - Part 2: Communication Requirements and Network Architecture

1997-06-01
HISTORICAL
J2293/2_199706
SAE J2293 establishes requirements for Electric Vehicles (EV) and the off-board Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) used to transfer electric energy to an EV from an electric utility power system (utility) in North America. This document defines, either directly or by reference, all characteristics of the total EV energy transfer system (EV-ETS) necessary to insure the functional interoperability of an EV and EVSE of the same physical system architecture. The ETS, regardless of architecture, is responsible for the conversion of AC electrical energy into DC electrical energy that can be used to change the storage battery of an EV, as shown. The different physical ETS system architectures are identified by the form of the energy that is transferred between the EV and the EVSE, as shown. It is possible for an EV and EVSE to support more than one architecture.
Standard

Energy Transfer System for Electric Vehicles--Part 1: Functional Requirements and System Architectures

2008-07-07
HISTORICAL
J2293/1_200807
SAE J2293 establishes requirements for Electric Vehicles (EV) and the off- board Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) used to transfer electrical energy to an EV from an Electric Utility Power System (Utility) in North America. This document defines, either directly or by reference, all characteristics of the total EV Energy Transfer System (EV-ETS) necessary to insure the functional interoperability of an EV and EVSE of the same physical system architecture. The ETS, regardless of architecture, is responsible for the conversion of AC electrical energy into DC electrical energy that can be used to charge the Storage Battery of an EV, as shown.
Standard

Measurement of Hydrogen Gas Emission from Battery-Powered Passenger Cars and Light Trucks During Battery Charging

1994-12-01
HISTORICAL
J1718_199412
This SAE Recommended Practice describes a procedure for measuring gaseous hydrogen emissions from the aqueous battery system of a battery-powered passenger car or light truck. The purpose of this procedure is to determine what concentrations of hydrogen gas an electric vehicle together with its charger will generate while being charged in a residential garage. Gaseous emissions are measured during a sequence of vehicle tests and laboratory tests that simulate normal and abnormal conditions during operational use. The results of this test may be used to determine whether or not forced air ventilation is required when a particular electric vehicle and its associated battery and charging system are used in a residential garage.
Standard

Measurement of Hydrogen Gas Emission from Battery-Powered Passenger Cars and Light Trucks During Battery Charging

2008-11-25
CURRENT
J1718_200811
This SAE Recommended Practice describes a procedure for measuring gaseous hydrogen emissions from the aqueous battery system of a battery-powered passenger car or light truck. The purpose of this procedure is to determine what concentrations of hydrogen gas an electric vehicle together with its charger will generate while being charged in a residential garage. Gaseous emissions are measured during a sequence of vehicle tests and laboratory tests that simulate normal and abnormal conditions during operational use. The results of this test may be used to determine whether or not forced air ventilation is required when a particular electric vehicle and its associated battery and charging system are used in a residential garage.
Standard

Electric Vehicle Power Transfer System Using a Mechanized Coupler

2015-06-26
WIP
J3105
This document covers the general physical, electrical, functional, testing, and performance requirements for a mechanized (hands free) conductive power transfer system primarily for transit buses using an overhead coupler capable of, but not limited to, transferring DC power. It defines a conductive power transfer method including the curbside electrical contact interface, the vehicle connection interface, the electrical characteristics of the DC supply and the communication system. It also covers the functional and dimensional requirements for the vehicle connection interface and supply equipment interface.
Standard

xEV Labels to Assist First and Second Responders, and Others

2017-03-02
CURRENT
J3108_201703
This recommended practice prescribes clear and consistent labeling methodology for communicating important xEV high voltage safety information. Examples of such information include identifying key high voltage system component locations and high voltage disabling points. These recommendations are based on current industry best practices identified by the responder community. Although this recommended practice is written for xEVs with high voltage systems, these recommendations can be applied to any vehicle type.
Standard

Hybrid and EV First and Second Responder Recommended Practice

2017-03-15
WIP
J2990
xEVs involved in incidents present unique hazards associated with the high voltage system (including the battery system). These hazards can be grouped into 3 categories: chemical, electrical, and thermal. The potential consequences can vary depending on the size, configuration and specific battery chemistry. Other incidents may arise from secondary events such as garage fires and floods. These types of incidents are also considered in the recommended practice (RP). This RP aims to describe the potential consequences associated with hazards from xEVs and suggest common procedures to help protect emergency responders, tow and/or recovery, storage, repair, and salvage personnel after an incident has occurred with an electrified vehicle. Industry design standards and tools were studied and where appropriate, suggested for responsible organizations to implement.
Standard

Hybrid and Electric Vehicle Safety Systems Information Report

2015-01-23
CURRENT
J2990/2_201501
This information report provides an overview of a typical high voltage electric propulsion vehicle (xEV) and the associated on-board safety systems typically employed by OEM’s to protect these high voltage systems. The report aims to improve public confidence in xEV safety systems and dispel public misconceptions about the likelihood of being shocked by the high voltage system, even when the vehicle has been damaged. The report will document select high voltage systems used for xEV’s and describe safety systems employed to prevent exposure to the high voltage systems.
Standard

Hybrid and EV First and Second Responder Recommended Practice

2012-11-19
CURRENT
J2990_201211
xEVs involved in incidents present unique hazards associated with the high voltage system (including the battery system). These hazards can be grouped into 3 categories: chemical, electrical, and thermal. The potential consequences can vary depending on the size, configuration and specific battery chemistry. Other incidents may arise from secondary events such as garage fires and floods. These types of incidents are also considered in the recommended practice (RP). This RP aims to describe the potential consequences associated with hazards from xEVs and suggest common procedures to help protect emergency responders, tow and/or recovery, storage, repair, and salvage personnel after an incident has occurred with an electrified vehicle. Industry design standards and tools were studied and where appropriate, suggested for responsible organizations to implement.
Standard

Interconnection Requirements for Onboard, Utility-Interactive Inverter Systems

2015-05-19
CURRENT
J3072_201505
This SAE Standard J3072 establishes interconnection requirements for a utility-interactive inverter system which is integrated into a plug-in electric vehicle (PEV) and connects in parallel with an electric power system (EPS) by way of conductively-coupled, electric vehicle supply equipment (EVSE). This standard also defines the communication between the PEV and the EVSE required for the PEV onboard inverter to be configured and authorized by the EVSE for discharging at a site. The requirements herein are intended to be used in conjunction with IEEE 1547 Standard for Interconnecting Distributed Resources with Electric Power Systems and IEEE 1547.1 Standard for Conformance Test Procedures for Equipment Interconnecting Distributed Resources with Electric Power Systems.
Standard

Communication between Wireless Charged Vehicles and Wireless EV Chargers

2015-08-05
CURRENT
J2847/6_201508
This SAE Recommended Practice SAE J2847-6 establishes requirements and specifications for communications messages between wirelessly charged electric vehicles and the wireless charger. Where relevant, this document notes, but does not formally specify, interactions between the vehicle and vehicle operator. This is the 1st version of this document and captures the initial objectives of the SAE task force. The intent of step 1 is to record as much information on “what we think works” and publish. The effort continues however, to step 2 that allows public review for additional comments and viewpoints, while the task force also continues additional testing and early implementation. Results of step 2 effort will then be incorporated into updates of this document and lead to a republished version. The next revision will address the harmonization between SAE J2847-6 and ISO/IEC 15118-7 to ensure interoperability.
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