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Technical Paper

Elimination of Combustion Difficulties in a Glow Plug-Assisted Diesel Engine Operated with Pure Ethanol and Water-Ethanol Mixtures

1983-02-01
830373
Forced ignition with glow plugs has great potential for the utilization of alcohol fuels in diesel engines. However, the installation of glow plugs may cause misfiring or knocking in parts of the operating range. This paper presents an analysis of the factors influencing the ignition characteristics of ethanol in a glow plug-assisted diesel engine; these factors may be classified into two categories: the factors related to the temperature history of the drop lets before contact with the glow plug, and those related to the probability of contact. By optimizing these factors, the combustion difficulties were successfully eliminated over the whole operating range, and engine performance comparable with conventional diesel operation was achieved.
Technical Paper

The Effects of Flash Boiling Fuel Injection on Spray Characteristics” Combustion, and Engine Performance in DI and IDI Diesel Engines

1985-02-01
850071
This paper deals with the effects of flash-boiling injection of various kinds of fuels on spray characteristics, combustion, and engine performance in DI and IDI diesel engines. It is known that spray characteristics change dramatically at the boiling point of fuel. When the fuel temperature increases above the boiling point, the droplet size decreases apparently and the spray spreads much wider. At higher fuel temperatures, above the boiling point, the apparent effects are a lower smoke density and improved thermal efficiency at higher loads, resulting from the shorter combustion duration; it is thus possible to obtain a markedly improved engine performance in engines with a low air-utilization chamber. Remarkable changes in heat release with the increase in fuel temperature are; an increase in premised combustion quantity and shortening of the combustion duration. The changes in smoke emission and thermal efficiency for different engine types are also considered in this paper.
Technical Paper

Description and Analysis of Diesel Engine Rate of Combustion and Performance Using Wiebe's Functions

1985-02-01
850107
Two laboratory engines, one direct, injection and one indirect injection, were operated for a range of speeds, loads, injection timings, fuels, and steady and transient conditions. Rate of combustion data were derived and analyzed using a double Wiebe's function approximation. It is shown that three of the six function parameters are constant for a wide range of conditions and that the other three can be expressed as linear functions of the amount of fuel injected during ignition lag. Engine noise, smoke, and thermal efficiency correlate with the parameters describing the amount of premixed combustion and diffusive combustion duration. These characteristics may be optimized by reducing the quantity of premixed combustion while maintaining the duration of diffusive combustion to less than 60°CA.
Technical Paper

Low Carbon Flower Buildup, Low Smoke, and Efficient Diesel Operation with Vegetable Oils by Conversion to Mono-Esters and Blending with Diesel Oil or Alcohols

1984-09-01
841161
The purpose of this investigation is to evaluate the feasibility of rapeseed oil and palm oil for diesel fuel substitution in a naturally aspirated D.I. diesel engine, and also to find means to reduce the carbon deposit buildup in vegetable oil combustion. In the experiments, the engine performance, exhaust gas emissions, and carbon deposits were measured for a number of fuels: rapeseed oil, palm oil, methylester of rapeseed oil, and these fuels blended with ethanol or diesel fuel with different fuel temperatures. It was found that both of the vegetable oil fuels generated an acceptable engine performance and exhaust gas emission levels for short term operation, but they caused carbon deposit buildups and sticking of piston rings after extended operation.
Technical Paper

Effects of Combustion and Injection Systems on Unburnt HC and Particulate Emissions from a DI Diesel Engine

1986-09-01
861232
This paper is a systematic investigation of the effects of combustion and injection systems on hydrocarbon(HC) and particulate emissions from a DI diesel engine. Piston cavity diameter, swirl ratio, number of injection nozzle openings, and injection direction are varied as the experimental parameters, and the constituents in the soluble organic fraction (SOF) of the particulate were analyzed. The results show that the emission characteristics of deep dish chambers greatly differ from those of shallow dish chambers varying with the number of nozzle openings, the injection direction, and swirl intensity. The HC analysis shows mainly low carbon number gaseous HC constituents, and there is a tendency towards increasing polynucleation of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbon(PAH) in SOF with increasing soot formation.
Technical Paper

Effects of Super Heating of Heavy Fuels on Combustion and Performance in DI Diesel Engines

1986-02-01
860306
This paper is concerned with the effects of temperature of heavy fuels on combustion and engine performance in a naturally aspirated DI diesel engine. Engine performance and exhaust gas emissions were measured for rapeseed oil, B-heavy oil, and diesel fuel at fuel temperatures from 40°C to 400°C. With increased fuel temperature, mainly from improved efficiency of combustion there were significant reductions in the specific energy consumption and smoke emissions. It was found that the improvements were mainly a function of the fuel viscosity, and it was independent of the kind of fuel. The optimum temperature of the fuels with regard to specific energy consumption and smoke emission is about 90°C for diesel fuel, 240°C for B-heavy oil, and 300°C for rapeseed oil. At these temperatures, the viscosities of the fuels show nearly identical value, 0.9 - 3 cst. The optimum viscosity tends to increase slightly with increases in the swirl ratio in the combustion chamber.
Technical Paper

The Influence of Fuel Properties on Diesel-Soot Suppression with Soluble Fuel Additives

1991-02-01
910737
Diesel soot suppression effects of catalytic fuel additives for a range of fuels with different properties were investigated with calcium naphthenate. A single cylinder DI diesel engine and a thermobalance were used to determine the soot reduction and its mechanism for seven kinds of fuels. Experimental results showed that the catalytic effect of the fuel additive was different for the different fuels, and could be described by a parameter considering cetane number and kinematic viscosity. The fuel additives reduced soot more effectively for fuels with higher cetane number and lower kinematic viscosity. This result was explained by soot oxidation characteristics for the different fuels. Oxidation of soot with the metallic additive proceeds in two stages: stage I, a very rapid oxidation stage; and stage II, a following slow or ordinary oxidation stage.
Technical Paper

Characteristics of Unburned Hydrocarbon Emissions in a Low Compression Ratio DI Diesel Engine

2009-04-20
2009-01-1526
In a DI diesel engine, THC emissions increase significantly with lower compression ratios, a low coolant temperature, or during the transient state. During the transient after a load increase, THC emissions are increased significantly to very high concentrations from just after the start of the load increase until around the 10th cycle, then rapidly decreased until the 20th cycle, before gradually decreasing to a steady state value after 1000 cycles. In the fully-warmed steady state operation with a compression ratio of 16 and diesel fuel, THC is reasonably low, but THC increases with lower coolant temperatures or during the transient period just after increasing the load. This THC increase is due to the formation of over-lean mixture with the longer ignition delay and also due to the fuel adhering to the combustion chamber walls. A low distillation temperature fuel such as normal heptane can eliminate the THC increase.
Technical Paper

Description of Diesel Emissions by Individual Fuel Properties

1992-10-01
922221
The effects of several fuel property variables on the emissions from a D.I. diesel engine were individually analyzed. The results showed that the smoke and dry soot increased with increased kinematic viscosity, shorter ignition lag, and higher aromatic content, especially at high equivalence ratios. Over the whole range of equivalence ratios, SOF depended on and increased with only ignition lag. The NOx improved slightly with increased kinematic viscosity, higher ignitability, and decreased aromatic content. The unburnt HC also improved with decreased kinematic viscosity and higher ignitability. The distribution shape of distillation curves had little influence on the emissions.
Technical Paper

Ultra Low Emission and High Performance Diesel Combustion with Highly Oxygenated Fuel

2000-03-06
2000-01-0231
Significant improvements in exhaust emissions and engine performance in an ordinary DI diesel engine were realized with highly oxygenated fuels. The smoke emissions decreased sharply and linearly with increases in oxygen content and entirely disappeared at an oxygen content of 38 wt-% even at stoichiometric conditions. The NOx, THC, and CO were almost all removed with a three-way catalyst under stoichiometric diesel combustion at both the higher and lower BMEP with the combination of EGR and a three-way catalyst. The engine output for the highly oxygenated fuels was significantly higher than that with the conventional diesel fuel due to the higher air utilization.
Technical Paper

Improvements of Diesel Combustion and Emissions with Two-stage Fuel Injection at Different Piston Positions

2000-03-06
2000-01-1180
The fuel spray distribution in a DI diesel engine with pilot injection was actively controlled by pilot and main fuel injections at different piston positions to prevent the main fuel injection from hitting the pilot flame. A CFD analysis demonstrated that the movement of the piston with a cavity divided by a central lip along the center of the sidewall effectively separates the cores of the pilot and main fuel sprays. Experiments showed that an ordinary cavity without the central lip emitted more smoke, while smokeless, low NOx operation was realized with a cavity divided by a central lip even at heavy loads where ordinary operation without pilot injection emits smoke.
Technical Paper

Combustion Behaviors Under Accelerating Operation of an IDI Diesel Engine

1980-09-01
800966
In a four-cycle, naturally aspirated, pre-chamber diesel engine, the combustion characteristics such as the rates of fuel injection, the ignition lag, the rates of heat release, the combustion peak pressure, the maximum rates of pressure rise, and the smoke density, were investigated for over 70 consecutive cycles under acceleration, with the aid of an on-line data handling system developed for this experiment. The effects of operating conditions such as the fuel injection timing, the fuel spray angle, the wall temperature of the combustion chamber, and the coolant temperature, on the combustion characteristics were also investigated.
Technical Paper

Nature of Fundamental Parameters Related to Engine Combustion for a Wide Range of Oxygenated Fuels

2002-10-21
2002-01-2853
The fundamental parameters related to engine combustion and performances, such as, heating value, theoretical air-fuel ratio, adiabatic flame temperature, carbon dioxide (CO2), and nitric oxide (NO) emissions, specific heat and engine thermal efficiency were investigated with computations for a wide range of oxygenated fuels. The computed results showed that almost all of the above combustion-related parameters are closely related to oxygen content in the fuels regardless of the kinds or chemical structures of oxygenated fuels. An interesting finding was that with the increase in oxygen content in the fuels NO emission decreased linearly, and the engine thermal efficiency was almost unchanged below oxygen content of 30 wt-% but gradually decreased above 30 wt-%.
Technical Paper

Catalytic Effects of Metallic Fuel Additives on Oxidation Characteristics of Trapped Diesel Soot

1988-09-01
881224
The oxidations of Crapped diesel soots containing catalytic metals such as Ca, Ba, Fe, or Ni were characterized through thermogravimetric analysis with a thermobalance. Soot particles were generated by a single cylinder IDI diesel engine with metallic fuel additives. A two-stage oxidation process was observed with the metalcontalning soots. It was found that the first stage of oxidation is catalytically promoted by metal additives resulting in an enhanced reaction rate and a reduced activation energy. Soot reduction in the rapid first stage increases with increases in metal content. Soots containing Ba and Ca are oxidized most rapidly due to the larger reduction during the first stage. The second stage of oxidation is also slightly promoted by metal addition. The ignition temperature of the collected soot is substantially reduced by the metal additives.
Technical Paper

Ultra Low Emissions and High Performance Diesel Combustion with a Combination of High EGR, Three-Way Catalyst, and a Highly Oxygenated Fuel, Dimethoxy Methane (DMM)

2000-06-19
2000-01-1819
Ultra low emissions and high performance combustion was achieved with a combination of high EGR, a three-way catalyst, and a highly oxygenated liquid fuel, neat dimethoxy methane (DMM), in an ordinary DI diesel engine. The smokeless nature of neat DMM effectively allowed stoichiometric diesel combustion by controlling BMEP with EGR. NOx, THC, and CO emissions were reduced with a three-way catalyst. At lower BMEP with excess air, the EGR effectively reduced NOx. High-speed video in a bottom view type engine revealed that luminous flame decreased with increased fuel oxygen content and almost disappeared with DMM.
Technical Paper

Experimental Reduction of NOx, Smoke, and BSFC in a Diesel Engine Using Uniquely Produced Water (0 - 80%) to Fuel Emulsion

1978-02-01
780224
With the aid of static mixer and non-ionic emulsifying agent, a comparatively stable water-fuel emulsion was obtained. Engine performance in a 4 cycle direct injection engine using these fuels were studied. A large reduction of NOx concentration was obtained over the wide range of engine operation, in spite of increased ignition lag and rapid combustion. Furthermore, improvements of economy and reduction of exhaust smoke were obtained. The reduction of NOx concentration, fuel consumption and smoke were even more remarkable when compared with operating same engine with water fumigation.
Technical Paper

A Method to Improve the Solubility and Combustion Characteristics of Alcohol-Diesel Fuel Blends

1982-02-01
821113
This paper reports the results of two parallel investigations: An investigation on the solubility of alcohols in diesel fuels, and the diesel engine performance with the blended fuels. The investigation proposes an empirical formula for the solubility of alcohols in diesel fuels, as a function of temperature, water content, additive concentration and specific gravity of the diesel fuel. The engine performance when using the blended fuels was also investigated. Compared with conventional diesel fuels, the blended fuels show promise of better thermal efficiency, smoke free operation, and reduction of HC, NOx, and CO emissions.
Technical Paper

Nature and Reduction of Cycle-to-Cycle Combustion Engine with Ethanol-Diesel Fuel Blends

1983-09-12
831352
Many of the promissing alternative fuels have relatively low cetane numbers, and may-result in combustion variation problems. This paper presents the chracteristics of the cycle-to-cycle combustion variations in diesel engines, and analyzes and evaluates the mechanism. Combustion variations appear in various forms, such as variations in ignition lag, indicated mean effective pressure, maximum combustion pressure, or rate of heat release. These variations are clearly correlated, and it is possible to represent the combustion variations by the standard deviation in the combustion peak pressure. The combustion variations are random (non-periodic), and are affected by ethanol amount, intake air temperature, engine speed and other various operating conditions.
Technical Paper

Achievement of Stable and Clean Combustion Over a Wide Operating Range in a Spark-Assisted IDI Diesel Engine with Neat Ethanol

1984-02-01
840517
Spark-assisted diesel engines operated with alcohol fuels usually display misfiring or knocking problems. This paper presents an analysis of the factors influencing the ignition characteristics of ethanol in a swirl chamber diesel engine with a multi-spark ignitor. In the experiments, cycle-to-cycle combustion variations and the degree of knocking were investigated by changing engine parameters over a wide operating range. The results of the investigations showed that stable ignition and smooth combustion is achieved when a flammable mixture is formed in the vicinity of the spark plug when only a small amount of the injected fuel has evaporated. By optimizing the design factors, operation with high efficiency and low exhaust emissions was achieved.
Technical Paper

Combustion and Emissions in a New Concept DI Stratified Charge Engine with Two-Stage Fuel Injection

1994-03-01
940675
A new concept DISC engine equipped with a two-stage injection system was developed. The engine was modified from a single cylinder DI diesel engine with large cylinder diameter (135mm). Combustion characteristics and exhaust emissions with regular gasoline were examined, and the experiments were also made with gasoline-diesel fuel blends with higher boiling temperatures and lower octane numbers. To realize stratified mixture distribution in combustion chamber flexibly, the fuel was injected in two-stages: the first stage was before the compression stroke to create a uniform premixed lean mixture and the second stage was at the end of the compression stroke to maintain stable ignition and faster combustion. In this paper, the effect of the two-stage injection on combustion and exhaust emissions were analyzed under several operating conditions.
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