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Technical Paper

Investigating the Effect of Spray Targeting and Impingement on Diesel Engine Cold Start

2000-03-06
2000-01-0269
Analysis of the cold-starting performance of diesel engines requires the development of advanced models to describe the multicomponent nature of the fuel as well as the spray impingement and wall film behavior. A new approach to modeling the multicomponent nature of commercial fuels was implemented. This model is based on a continuous distribution using a probability density function, rather than the use of discrete components, to capture more accurately the entire range of composition in commercial fuels. The model was applied to single droplet calculations to validate the predictions against experimental results. Previous discrete component wall-film modeling has been extended to include the continuous multicomponent fuel representation. A significant factor that has received little attention in analyzing the cold-start performance of diesel engines is the spray impingement angle and location. This has been investigated using the modified KIVA code.
Technical Paper

Non-Equilibrium Turbulence Considerations for Combustion Processes in the Simulation of DI Diesel Engines

2000-03-06
2000-01-0586
A correction for the turbulence dissipation, based on non-equilibrium turbulence considerations from rapid distortion theory, has been derived and implemented in combination with the RNG k - ε model in a KIVA-based code. This model correction has been tested and compared with the standard RNG k - ε model for the compression and the combustion phase of two heavy duty DI diesel engines. The turbulence behavior in the compression phase shows clear improvements over the standard RNG k - ε model computations. In particular, the macro length scale is consistent with the corresponding time scale and with the turbulent kinetic energy over the entire compression phase. The combustion computations have been performed with the characteristic time combustion model. With this dissipation correction no additional adjustments of the turbulent characteristic time model constant were necessary in order to match experimental cylinder pressures and heat release rates of the two engines.
Technical Paper

Quasi-Steady High-Pressure Droplet Model for Diesel Sprays

2000-03-06
2000-01-0588
Droplet vaporization models that are currently employed in simulating diesel engine sprays are based on a quasi-steady, low-pressure formulation. This formulation does not adequately represent many high-pressure effects, such as non-ideal gas behavior, solubility of gases into liquid, pressure dependence of liquid- and gas-phase thermophysical properties, and transient liquid transport in the droplet interior. More importantly, the quasi-steady assumption becomes increasingly questionable as the ambient pressure approaches and /or exceeds the fuel critical pressure. In the present study, a high-pressure, quasi-steady vaporization model is developed. Except for the quasi-steady assumption that is retained in the model, it incorporates all the other high-pressure effects.
Technical Paper

Modeling the Effects of Auxiliary Gas Injection on Diesel Engine Combustion and Emissions

2000-03-06
2000-01-0657
The effect of auxiliary gas injection on diesel engine combustion and emissions was studied using KIVA, a multidimensional computational fluid dynamics code. Auxiliary gas injection (AGI) is the injection of gas, in addition to the fuel injection, directly into the combustion chamber of a diesel engine. The objective of AGI is to influence the diesel combustion via mixing to reduce the emissions of pollutants (soot and NOx). In this study, the accuracy of modeling high-speed gas jets on very coarse computational grids was addressed. KIVA was found to inaccurately resolve jet flows near walls. The cause of this inaccuracy was traced to the RNG k - ϵ turbulence model with the law-of-the-wall boundary condition used by KIVA. By prescribing the length scale near the nozzle exit, excellent agreement between computed and theoretical jet penetration was obtained for a transient jet into a quiescent chamber at various operating conditions.
Technical Paper

The Influence of Physical Input Parameter Uncertainties on Multidimensional Model Predictions of Diesel Engine Performance and Emissions

2000-03-06
2000-01-1178
Multidimensional models require physical inputs about the engine operating conditions. This paper explores the effects of unavoidable experimental uncertainties in the specification of important parameters such as the start of injection, duration of injection, amount of fuel injected per cycle, gas temperature at IVC, and the spray nozzle hole diameter. The study was conducted for a Caterpillar 3401 heavy-duty diesel engine for which extensive experimental data is available. The engine operating conditions include operation at high and low loads, with single and double injections. The computations were performed using a modified version of the KIVA3V code. Initially the model was calibrated to give very good agreement with experimental data in terms of trends and also to a lesser degree in absolute values, over a range of operating conditions and injection timings.
Technical Paper

Modeling Fuel System Performance and Its Effect on Spray Characteristics

2000-03-06
2000-01-1253
Fuel Injection System (FIS) research on injection pressure, timing control, and rate shaping, and studies on the modeling of injector nozzle flows and their effect on fuel spray characteristics are usually conducted separately. Only recently has the fuel injection and spraying process been studied as a complete system, i.e., including both the high-pressure fuel delivery and its effect on the nozzle flow characteristics, including nozzle cavitation. A methodology for coupling the fuel injection system and its effect on spray characteristics is presented here. The method is applied to an example case of a conventional pump-line-nozzle system. Mathematical models for characterizing the flows from the pump to the nozzle are formulated and solved using the Method of Characteristics and finite difference techniques. The nozzle internal flow is modeled using zero-dimensional flow models, in which the nozzle cavitation and its effect on the nozzle exit flow are accounted for.
Technical Paper

Modeling the Effects of Injector Nozzle Geometry on Diesel Sprays

1999-03-01
1999-01-0912
A phenomenological nozzle flow model has been developed and implemented in both the FIRE and KIVA-II codes to simulate the effects of the nozzle geometry on fuel injection and spray processes. The model takes account of the nozzle passage inlet configuration, flow losses and cavitation, the injection pressure and combustion chamber conditions and provides initial conditions for multidimensional spray modeling. The discharge coefficient of the injector, the effective injection velocity and the initial drop or injected liquid ‘blob’ sizes are calculated dynamically during the entire injection event. The model was coupled with the wave breakup model to simulate experiments of non-vaporizing sprays under diesel conditions. Good agreement was obtained in liquid penetration, spray angle and drop size (Sauter Mean Diameter). The integrated model was also used to model combustion in a Cummins single-cylinder optical engine with good agreement.
Technical Paper

The Influence of Boost Pressure on Emissions and Fuel Consumption of a Heavy-Duty Single-Cylinder D.I. Diesel Engine

1999-03-01
1999-01-0840
An electronically controlled Caterpillar single-cylinder oil test engine (SCOTE) was used to study diesel combustion. The SCOTE retains the port, combustion chamber, and injection geometry of the production six cylinder, 373 kW (500 hp) 3406E heavy-duty truck engine. The engine was equipped with an electronic unit injector and an electronically controlled common rail injector that is capable of multiple injections. An emissions investigation was carried out using a six-mode cycle simulation of the EPA Federal Transient Test Procedure. The results show that the SCOTE meets current EPA mandated emissions levels, despite the higher internal friction imposed by the single-cylinder configuration. NOx versus particulate trade-off curves were generated over a range of injection timings for each mode and results of heat release calculations were examined, giving insight into combustion phenomena in current “state of the art” heavy-duty diesel engines.
Technical Paper

Modeling Fuel Preparation and Stratified Combustion in a Gasoline Direct Injection Engine

1999-03-01
1999-01-0175
Fuel preparation and stratified combustion were studied for a conceptual gasoline Direct-Injection Spark-Ignition (GDI or DISI) engine by computer simulations. The primary interest was on the effects of different injector orientations and the effects of tumble ratio for late injection cases at a partial load operating condition. A modified KIVA-3V code that includes improved spray breakup and wall impingement and combustion models was used. A new ignition kernel model, called DPIK, was developed to describe the early flame growth process. The model uses Lagrangian marker particles to describe the flame positions. The computational results reveal that spray wall impingement is important and the fuel distribution is controlled by the spray momentum and the combustion chamber shape. The injector orientation significantly influences the fuel stratification pattern, which results in different combustion characteristics.
Technical Paper

Intake Flow Simulation and Comparison with PTV Measurements

1999-03-01
1999-01-0176
Intake flow simulations were carried out for a prototype DISI engine using the standard k-ε model and the RNG k-ε model. The results were compared with PTV (transient water analog) measurements. The study was focused on low load operations with engine speed at 400 rev/min. Two cases were studied, a single intake case in which one intake port was blocked and a dual intake port case. In the computations, the results show that the standard k-ε model tends to produce higher turbulence levels when turbulence is generated and decays faster when turbulence dissipates. Different turbulence models predict almost the same flow structures. However, the effects of the turbulence model on the predicted tumble and swirl ratios are significant. The TKE distributions at BDC predicted by the two models are also different. The standard k-ε model seems to be more diffusive. Good agreements with PTV data were obtained in the single valve case with the RNG k-ε model.
Technical Paper

Pressure-Swirl Atomization in the Near Field

1999-03-01
1999-01-0496
To model sprays from pressure-swirl atomizers, the connection between the injector and the downstream spray must be considered. A new model for pressure-swirl atomizers is presented which assumes little knowledge of the internal details of the injector, but instead uses available observations of external spray characteristics. First, a correlation for the exit velocity at the injector exit is used to define the liquid film thickness. Next, the film must be modeled as it becomes a thin, liquid sheet and breaks up, forming ligaments and droplets. A linearized instability analysis of the breakup of a viscous, liquid sheet is used as part of the spray boundary condition. The spray angle is estimated from spray photographs and patternator data. A mass averaged spray angle is calculated from the patternator data and used in some of the calculations.
Technical Paper

Two-Color Combustion Visualization of Single and Split Injections in a Single-Cylinder Heavy-Duty D.I. Diesel Engine Using an Endoscope-Based Imaging System

1999-03-01
1999-01-1112
An experimental study of luminous combustion in a modern diesel engine was performed to investigate the effect of injection parameters on NOX and soot formation via flame temperature and soot KL factor measurements. The two-color technique was applied to 2-D soot luminosity images and area-averaged soot radiation signals to obtain spatially and temporally resolved flame temperature and soot KL factor. The imaging system used for this study was based on a wide-angle endoscope that was mounted in the cylinder head and allowed different views of the combustion chamber. The experiments were carried out on a single-cylinder 2.4 liter D.I. diesel engine equipped with an electronically controlled common-rail injection system. Operating conditions were 1600 rpm and 75% load. The two-color results confirm that retarding the injection timing causes lower flame temperatures and NOX emissions but increased soot formation, independent of injection strategy.
Technical Paper

Studying the Roles of Kinetics and Turbulence in the Simulation of Diesel Combustion by Means of an Extended Characteristic-Time-Model

1999-03-01
1999-01-1177
A study was performed that takes into account both turbulence and chemical kinetic effects in the numerical simulation of diesel engine combustion in order to better understand the importance of their respective roles at changing operating conditions. An approach was developed which combines the simplicity and low computational and storage requests of the laminar-and-turbulent characteristic-time model with a detailed combustion chemistry model based on well-known simplified mechanisms. Assuming appropriate simplifications such as steady state or equilibrium for most of the radicals and intermediate species, the kinetics of hydrocarbons can be described by means of three overall steps. This approach was integrated in the KIVA-II code. The concept was validated and applied to a single-cylinder, heavy-duty engine. The simulation covers a wide range of operating conditions.
Technical Paper

Scaling Aspects of the Characteristic Time Combustion Model in the Simulation of Diesel Engines

1999-03-01
1999-01-1175
Combustion simulations utilizing the characteristic time combustion model have been performed for four DI diesel engines ranging in size from heavy-duty to large-bore designs. It has been found that the pre-factor to the turbulent characteristic time acts as a scaling parameter between the engines. This phenomenon is explained in terms of the non-equilibrium behavior of the turbulent time and length scales, as is encountered in the rapidly distorting, spray-induced flows of DI diesel engines. In fact, the equilibrium assumption between turbulence production and dissipation, which forms the basis for the employed k-ε-type turbulence models, does not hold in these situations. For such flows, the real turbulent dissipation time scale is locally proportional to the turbulent characteristic time scale which is determined by a typical eddy turnover time.
Technical Paper

Effects of Initial Conditions in Multidimensional Combustion Simulations of HSDI Diesel Engines

1999-03-01
1999-01-1180
The effects of numerical methodology in defining the initial conditions and simulating the compression stroke in D.I. diesel engine CFD computations are studied. Lumped and pointwise approaches were adopted in assigning the initial conditions at IVC. The lumped approach was coupled with a two-dimensional calculation of the compression stroke. The pointwise methodology was based on the results of an unsteady calculation of the intake stroke performed by using the STAR-CD code in the realistic engine and port geometry. Full engine and 60 deg. sector meshes were used in the compression stroke calculations in order to check the accuracy of the commonly applied axi-symmetric fluid dynamics assumption. Analysis of the evolution of the main fluid dynamics parameters revealed that local conditions at the time of injection strongly depend on the numerical procedure adopted.
Technical Paper

Development of a Universal Turbulent Combustion Model for Premixed and Direct Injection Spark/Compression Ignition Engines

2004-03-08
2004-01-0102
A universal engine combustion model based on the level-set approach was developed in this study. It was first used to model combustion in Spark Ignition (SI) and Direct Injection Spark Ignition (DISI) engines when combined with the Discrete Particle Spark Ignition model, in which the ignition kernel is represented by particles. Once the flame kernel grows to a size that the turbulent flame is fully developed, the G-equation model is used to track the subsequent propagation of the turbulent flame. When combined with a characteristic time combustion model, the triple flame structure that is found in DISI engine combustion was successfully modeled. The model was also applied to simulate diesel combustion where the diffusion combustion regime is dominant. In this case, the ignition was modeled using the Shell auto-ignition model. Satisfactory agreement with features of the conceptual diesel combustion model of Dec [1997] was found.
Technical Paper

Simulation of Effects of Valve Pockets and Internal Residual Gas Distribution on HSDI Diesel Combustion and Emissions

2004-03-08
2004-01-0105
Experiments show that intake flow details have a significant influence on High-Speed Direct-Injection (HSDI) diesel engine soot emissions. Four different intake modes were simulated using the combination of the CFD codes, STAR-CD and KIVA-3V, to investigate spray-intake flow-emission interaction characteristics. The simulation results were compared to steady-state flow bench data and engine experimental data. It was found that it is difficult to accurately predict the timing of the small pilot and main combustion events, simultaneously, with current simplified ignition models. NOx emissions were predicted well, however, an insensitivity of the soot emissions to the details of the intake process was found, mainly due to the deficiencies in predicting the ignition delay. The results show that a strong swirling flow causes the formed soot to remain within the bowl, leading to high soot emissions.
Technical Paper

Optimization of Injection Rate Shape Using Active Control of Fuel Injection

2004-03-08
2004-01-0530
The effect of injection rate shape on spray evolution and emission characteristics is investigated and a methodology for active control of fuel injection is proposed. Extensive validation of advanced vaporization and primary jet breakup models was performed with experimental data before studying the effects of systematic changes of injection rate shape. Excellent agreement with the experiments was obtained for liquid and vapor penetration lengths, over a broad range of gas densities and temperatures. Also the predicted flame lift-off lengths of reacting diesel fuel sprays were in good agreement with the experiments. After the validation of the models, well-defined rate shapes were used to study the effect of injection rate shape on liquid and vapor penetration, flame lift-off lengths and emission characteristics.
Technical Paper

Development and Validation of a Reduced Reaction Mechanism for HCCI Engine Simulations

2004-03-08
2004-01-0558
A reduced chemical reaction mechanism is developed and validated in the present study for multi-dimensional diesel HCCI engine combustion simulations. The motivation for the development of the reduced mechanism is to enhance the computational efficiency of engine stimulations. The new reduced mechanism was generated starting from an existing n-heptane mechanism (40 species and 165 reactions). The procedure of generating the reduced mechanism included: using SENKIN to produce the ignition delay data and solution files, using XSENKPLOT to analyze the base mechanism and to identify important reactions and species, eliminating unimportant species and reactions, formulating the new reduced mechanism, using the new mechanism to generate ignition delay data, and finally adjusting kinetic constants in the new mechanism to improve ignition delay and engine combustion predictions to account for diesel fuel cetane number and composition effects.
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